Sand pits

Discussion in 'Railway History & Nostalgia' started by R4_GRN, 27 Apr 2015.

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  1. R4_GRN

    R4_GRN Member

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    In the 1960s there was a sand trap at Ninewells junction on the main Dundee to Perth line which I assume was to stop runaways from the Newtyle railway running onto the main line. The line up to Liff station was long and fairly steep so a runaway would have gathered a fair speed. The trap consisted of a wooden box encasing both rails for a fair distance filled with sand, although due to a cliff face the trap turned towards the main line so if it did not stop the runaway it would still have gone onto the main line.

    Were they effective? could they slow a goods wagon or a locomotive? What if sand was wet and heavy frost, did the trap still work? Did it stop the runaway or did it usually de-rail?

    Are they still used in modern times ?
     
  2. Ploughman

    Ploughman Established Member

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    There used to be one installed on the UP approaching the Swing Bridge over the Ouse at Goole. Removed around 2009.

    On the NYMR there is one in place at Goathland.

    I believe that they do work in a similar fashion to those installed on roads.
     
  3. theageofthetra

    theageofthetra Established Member

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    Some yards still have these to protect the main line. Grove park certainly has on the down side due to the gradient from what was formally a hump goods yard.
     
  4. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    Time was when even running loops would have them, though I remember them as encasing the individual running rails. Kent House loops come to mind. Not on a significant gradient either.
     
    Last edited: 28 Apr 2015
  5. R4_GRN

    R4_GRN Member

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    Oops, my poor choice of words, a wooden box encased each rail not one box across both rails. Must try harder!
     
  6. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    I think I've seen both.
     
  7. ChiefPlanner

    ChiefPlanner Established Member

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    Less so with no unfitted trains - South Wales had a few - as in Taffs Well off the "Big Hill" from Aber Junction. Nothing ever reported - though the local PW gangs raked out the tell tale marks from time to time.

    Official term was "sand drag" ....
     
  8. krus_aragon

    krus_aragon Established Member

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    I believe there was a set protecting the single line portion of the North Wales Coast Line over the Britannia Bridge after it was rebuilt. I'm not sure if they remain there...
     
  9. Ploughman

    Ploughman Established Member

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    Never heard them called Sand Pits.
    Always known them as "Sand Drags".
     
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