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Scones and the Correct Order of things - a poll

Jam-first or cream-first on your scone.. what's it to be?

  • Cream then jam, aka the Devon method

    Votes: 35 31.0%
  • Jam then cream, aka the Cornwall method

    Votes: 60 53.1%
  • What's a scone?

    Votes: 14 12.4%
  • Jam then scone then cream, aka the 'you what?' method

    Votes: 4 3.5%

  • Total voters
    113
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nlogax

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Can we do a poll on whether cream or jam goes first on cream teas? We'll have Cornwall and Devon declaring war by midnight ;)

FWIW the Cornwall method is obviously superior. Cream should not be a butter replacement and anyone whom believes differently is a heathen and a wastrel. I've wasted a few minutes creating this poll purely to understand how many of you are in the wrong ;)
 
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GusB

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I'll never understand this fuss about whether the jam or the cream goes on top; it all ends up the same way once it gets past your gob!

Who would dream of putting jam on a cheese scone anyway? ;)
 

D6130

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Another divide - Scon or Scone. I'm scone, the clearly superior version.
The Scottish pronunciation - bearing in mind that the item in question is named after a village/palace/coronation stone near Perth - is almost universally 'scon'....which is slightly strange as the place name is pronounced 'scoon'. A long-standing Anglicisation perhaps?
 

jupiter

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Cream on jam, jam goes everywhere. Jam on cream, cream stays in place: two lovely uniform layers.

Scon.
 

32475

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I’m definitely of the Devon persuasion. My son and I recently walked some of the SW Coast Path and after crossing into Cornwall we stopped at an excellent tea room where we indulged in both methods for the purposes of racial harmony!
IMG_4518.jpegIMG_4468.jpeg
 

birchesgreen

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On my scone i put butter, cream then jam on it. Seems a more logical way to do it as cream onto jam gets messy.

However, having some (fairly remote) Cornish heritage i guess this does make me a traitor.
 

dgl

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If not put in the mixture/sauce for something then cream is generally used as a topping, hence it goes on the top of the jam. Personally I also put butter on it, and cream is no butter substitute.
 

Cowley

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FWIW the Cornwall method is obviously superior. Cream should not be a butter replacement and anyone whom believes differently is a heathen and a wastrel. I've wasted a few minutes creating this poll purely to understand how many of you are in the wrong ;)

You’re so close to getting a warning for misleading information right now. :lol:
 

Urobach

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205
I'm the one that does one cream then jam then one jam then cream to mix it up a bit

And its scone not scon :D
 

gg1

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I'll never understand this fuss about whether the jam or the cream goes on top; it all ends up the same way once it gets past your gob!
My thoughts exactly, you don't hear arguments about whether salt goes on chips before or after vinegar, the jam/cream argument is just as silly.

Pronunciation - rhymes with stone
 

westv

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For me, it is far easier to spread cream over jam then it is to spread jam over cream.
 

westv

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My thoughts exactly, you don't hear arguments about whether salt goes on chips before or after vinegar, the jam/cream argument is just as silly.

Pronunciation - rhymes with stone
I don't put salt on any meal.
 

cb a1

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My thoughts exactly, you don't hear arguments about whether salt goes on chips before or after vinegar.
The argument is salt and sauce vs. salt and vinegar. The former being absolutely the superior.
 

gg1

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The argument is salt and sauce vs. salt and vinegar. The former being absolutely the superior.
Despite only trying salt and sauce once I have to agree. Unfortunately I'm probably around 300 miles away from the nearest chippy which offers it.
 

cb a1

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And its scone not scon :D
I believe folk are using scon to explain which pronunciation they use (i.e. the magic e doesn't change the o to an oh (or oo in the case of the village in Scotland)

Despite only trying salt and sauce once I have to agree. Unfortunately I'm probably around 300 miles away from the nearest chippy which offers it.
My deepest condolences.
 

Essan

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The correct method for a scon is cream, jam, cream!

For chips, the correct method is vinegar, vinegar, some more vinegar, then salt and finally ketchup on top.
 

32475

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Here’s a thought; is there any historical evidence of the SR or GWR (the proper ones) serving scones with jam and cream in their buffets and dining cars? If there is any such evidence then this should be the deciding factor.
 

61653 HTAFC

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The Scottish pronunciation - bearing in mind that the item in question is named after a village/palace/coronation stone near Perth - is almost universally 'scon'....which is slightly strange as the place name is pronounced 'scoon'. A long-standing Anglicisation perhaps?
I always thought the two terms (Scottish place with famous stone; and baked item) were unrelated.

The baked item should rhyme with stone, and the jam should go on first, but that's just my preference. I don't approve of butter being used at all if you're having both jam and cream, but if it's jam only then butter is not only acceptable but compulsory. I did once see someone put butter jam and cream on a cheese scone, which in my book would lead to a spell in the stocks!
 

Urobach

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I believe folk are using scon to explain which pronunciation they use (i.e. the magic e doesn't change the o to an oh (or oo in the case of the village in Scotland)
.

I'm aware. By saying scone I'm saying how I pronounce it
 
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