Station Platform Stopping Position and Canopies

GWRrrr

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Sorry if this has been covered elsewhere but I can't find it.

A number of station platforms have canopies for part of their length. But trains often stop at the part of the platform that isn't covered by the canopy. This isn't great for passengers on a rainy day. So I wondered why this is done? Why don't they stop at the part of the platform that is covered?

Thanks
 
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Aictos

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Sorry if this has been covered elsewhere but I can't find it.

A number of station platforms have canopies for part of their length. But trains often stop at the part of the platform that isn't covered by the canopy. This isn't great for passengers on a rainy day. So I wondered why this is done? Why don't they stop at the part of the platform that is covered?

Thanks
Maybe because the train can't be fully in the platform if they decided to stop exactly under the canopy, Hertford North Platform 2/3 has a canopy but as the station is served by 6 coach trains, they don't fit under the canopy.
 

30907

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Sorry if this has been covered elsewhere but I can't find it.

A number of station platforms have canopies for part of their length. But trains often stop at the part of the platform that isn't covered by the canopy. This isn't great for passengers on a rainy day. So I wondered why this is done? Why don't they stop at the part of the platform that is covered?

Thanks
Depends on things like signal positions and monitors for driver only operation.
AIUI there's increasingly a preference for all trains to stop at the same point to reduce driver errors.
If you have some examples, people who know the stations may have specific answers
 

bramling

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Depends on things like signal positions and monitors for driver only operation.
AIUI there's increasingly a preference for all trains to stop at the same point to reduce driver errors.
If you have some examples, people who know the stations may have specific answers

Stevenage up is an example of markers being co-located. Since last year 8-car 700s stop with the cab right at the front of the platform, same as for the 12-cars. A good example of resolving one problem and creating another, as it means the very rear of the train stops level with the staircase, resulting in a scrum getting on, and people rushing down the platform as the train flies past them.
 

GWRrrr

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Depends on things like signal positions and monitors for driver only operation.
AIUI there's increasingly a preference for all trains to stop at the same point to reduce driver errors.
If you have some examples, people who know the stations may have specific answers

Exeter St Davids is an example. Most platforms, only the southern half is covered, but northbound trains go to the very end and if it's a shorter train none of it is under cover.
 

30907

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Exeter St Davids is an example. Most platforms, only the southern half is covered, but northbound trains go to the very end and if it's a shorter train none of it is under cover.
Not been there for years - does that include trains reversing/terminating (eg in 3/4)?
 

Scott W

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Dawlish is one definite example, if I recall correctly it's due the size of the gap between the platform and train, similar at Starcross, but there I now a modern additional shelter further down the platform.
 

306024

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Ipswich platform 1.

Only used by class 755s but they raise the pantograph when in the station. The overhead line doesn’t run the full length of the platform so they have to stop short of the canopy.
 

Deepgreen

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Redhill p0. GWR trains stop all the way down at the Southern 4/5 car mark. It's something I've raised but the huge cost of a tiny single sign for a 2/3 car mark would be crippling. Ludicrous. Passengers are further away from the stairs and have a greater chance of missing other trains too.

Depends on things like signal positions and monitors for driver only operation.
AIUI there's increasingly a preference for all trains to stop at the same point to reduce driver errors.
If you have some examples, people who know the stations may have specific answers
Probably - the railway shouldn't be run for passengers' benefit, after all.
 
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Hadders

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Stevenage up is an example of markers being co-located. Since last year 8-car 700s stop with the cab right at the front of the platform, same as for the 12-cars. A good example of resolving one problem and creating another, as it means the very rear of the train stops level with the staircase, resulting in a scrum getting on, and people rushing down the platform as the train flies past them.
It's even worse when a 5 car Azuma turns up.

Interestingly, although there aren't many of them, 4 and 8 car 387s have a different stopping point to 12 car 387s.
 

YorksLad12

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Depends on things like signal positions and monitors for driver only operation.
AIUI there's increasingly a preference for all trains to stop at the same point to reduce driver errors.
If you have some examples, people who know the stations may have specific answers
Leeds P17. The canopy is about 25 metres, so barely covers one carriage; it regularly takes 2x2 carriages (150, 188, 195) or a 3-carriage 185. Horrible place when raining.
 

30907

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Probably - the railway shouldn't be run for passengers' benefit, after all.
Stopping short doesn't benefit passengers either, of course... :)
Leeds P17. The canopy is about 25 metres, so barely covers one carriage; it regularly takes 2x2 carriages (150, 188, 195) or a 3-carriage 185. Horrible place when raining.
Not quite what the OP was asking about.
 

infobleep

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Stopping short doesn't benefit passengers either, of course... :)
No, it doesn't but if they stop at the wrong place how dangerous is this? I mean is there a high risk the guard will open the doors and passengers go onto the track, possibly by falling out?

The situation at Redhill is annoying. On other platforms at Redhill, they don't run to the very end. Would that be confusing for drivers, given its different rules for different platforms?

What is the point of a canopy, with the trains stop beyond it?
 

O L Leigh

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No, it doesn't but if they stop at the wrong place how dangerous is this? I mean is there a high risk the guard will open the doors and passengers go onto the track, possibly by falling out?

That rather depends. Mistakes happen, so a pinch of mitigation helps to prevent these mistakes turning into incidents. It's more likely to be seen in DOO-land, though.
 

infobleep

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That rather depends. Mistakes happen, so a pinch of mitigation helps to prevent these mistakes turning into incidents. It's more likely to be seen in DOO-land, though.
All north Downs Line trains have guards but obviously DOO trains also use platform 0.
 

bramling

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That rather depends. Mistakes happen, so a pinch of mitigation helps to prevent these mistakes turning into incidents. It's more likely to be seen in DOO-land, though.

The question is whether the risk of a stop-short once in a blue moon outweighs the risk of passengers chasing along the platform every time a train arrives, which is what now happens at Stevenage platform 1.

If it's considered to be a major risk then perhaps time for an engineered safeguard, similar to what is found on LU (I say similar, as it would also need to protect against stopping short).
 

43066

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Another issue can be where company instructions are issued to only stop certain types of stock at certain stop boards. This can lead to perverse results where short trains end up being driven all the way to the end, but a driver stopping at the “correct” place could potentially be accused of stopping short, which is a serious safety of the line incident.
 

infobleep

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The question is whether the risk of a stop-short once in a blue moon outweighs the risk of passengers chasing along the platform every time a train arrives, which is what now happens at Stevenage platform 1.

If it's considered to be a major risk then perhaps time for an engineered safeguard, similar to what is found on LU (I say similar, as it would also need to protect against stopping short).
Good point about running. Once my train was delayed outside Redhill and then pathed into platform 0 as they decided to stop it short

I then ran round to platform 3 but missed the connecting train of course and had a wait. Bear in mind I was connecting to a train at Gatwick Airport as well.
 

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