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"Strange Christian Names"

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PHILIPE

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Nearly a fifth of parents regret baby name - survey
BBC News‎ - 9 hours ago
Almost a fifth of parents in the UK regret the name they chose for their child, ... 31 August 2016 ... chose for their offspring, but only 2% actually changed their child's name.


I've been intending to post about this topic but this News from the BBC today has urged me to get on with it.
Over recent years there has been a practice of abandoning traditional Christmas with many new ones cropping up. Many new ones seem to start with a C or K and some just seem to have been made up on the spot, some of which eventually get copied by other people. A practice with boys seems to be using recognised surnames for christian names such as Bailey, Taylor and others.
Another thing which makes me cringe is the use of double-barelled names for girls, i.e. Daisy-May.
 
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Busaholic

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Nearly a fifth of parents regret baby name - survey
BBC News‎ - 9 hours ago
Almost a fifth of parents in the UK regret the name they chose for their child, ... 31 August 2016 ... chose for their offspring, but only 2% actually changed their child's name.


I've been intending to post about this topic but this News from the BBC today has urged me to get on with it.
Over recent years there has been a practice of abandoning traditional Christmas with many new ones cropping up. Many new ones seem to start with a C or K and some just seem to have been made up on the spot, some of which eventually get copied by other people. A practice with boys seems to be using recognised surnames for christian names such as Bailey, Taylor and others.
Another thing which makes me cringe is the use of double-barelled names for girls, i.e. Daisy-May.

That Taylor Swift seems like a nice boy:)
 

headshot119

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Nearly a fifth of parents regret baby name - survey
BBC News‎ - 9 hours ago
Almost a fifth of parents in the UK regret the name they chose for their child, ... 31 August 2016 ... chose for their offspring, but only 2% actually changed their child's name.


I've been intending to post about this topic but this News from the BBC today has urged me to get on with it.
Over recent years there has been a practice of abandoning traditional Christmas with many new ones cropping up. Many new ones seem to start with a C or K and some just seem to have been made up on the spot, some of which eventually get copied by other people. A practice with boys seems to be using recognised surnames for christian names such as Bailey, Taylor and others.
Another thing which makes me cringe is the use of double-barelled names for girls, i.e. Daisy-May.

Are you saying the use of Taylor as a Christian name is a recent thing? I know a few Taylor's all of whom are nearing 30!
 

richw

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Whilst not regretting our name choices, my 2nd daughters name we found when she was around a year old is a shortened version of our older daughters name! We still like both names

I saw an example where a teenage child starts being bullied because a cartoon character came out with her Christian name.
 

PaxVobiscum

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The practice of having a familiar sounding first name but which has a unusual (or sometimes downright silly) spelling seems alive and well too - Izobel, Johnathon, Maddisyn etc. I dare say it's mainly affectation, but some might just be bad spelling from the parents like the unfortunate young lady I knew who was called 'Machelle' because that was how her parents pronounced it (This was in Glasgow :D). It always made me think of part of an aircraft (nacelle).

This practice reminds me of the story about the haughty lady who hade a very expensive posh dog which she called 'Phideau'.
 

90019

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eQ9O1fNm.jpg


pizza
i'm going to name my daughter
casserole so then she'll get the
nickname cass and people will be like
"oh, cass is short for cassandra, right?"
and she will have to explain to them her
name is casserole
 
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Domh245

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They were the two who immediately came to my mind as well! Will the next naming after a fruit be Bananas or Blueberries?

The first celeb who came to my mind was Jamie Oliver, with his children Poppy Honey Rosie, Daisy Boo Pamela, Petal Blossom Rainbow, Buddy Bear Maurice, and River Rocket. Poor Children
 

J-2739

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I think giving kids unusual names like after 'peaches' is like luring bullies to the treasure when you didn't have to.
 
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yorkie

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Over recent years there has been a practice of abandoning traditional Christmas with many new ones cropping up.
I'm not sure how "Christian" names can be seen to be any more traditional than what came before them, e.g. Norse names, I am sure back in the day Christian names were seen as very untraditional :lol:
Many new ones seem to start with a C or K
That's true. There are also a huge variety of Kieron's out there (there must be at least 5 spelling variations I've heard).
and some just seem to have been made up on the spot
Just as Christian names were, back in the day? ;)
some of which eventually get copied by other people.
Just as Christians did then ;)

A practice with boys seems to be using recognised surnames for christian names such as Bailey, Taylor and others.
There seem to be just as many girls with those names as boys!

Another thing which makes me cringe is the use of double-barelled names for girls, i.e. Daisy-May.
Double-barrelled names are actually very common now (and not just for posh people ;):lol:) although more for surnames than first names. I don't think I've yet met anyone who has a double-barrelled first name and a double-barrelled surname, but it's just a matter of time I'm sure....

Another craze is same first name as surname e.g. "Taylor Taylor" or "Cameron Cameron" (not actual ones I've heard but they are just examples)
 

richw

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Another craze is same first name as surname e.g. "Taylor Taylor" or "Cameron Cameron" (not actual ones I've heard but they are just examples)

A friend of a friend is called Johnathon Johns,
A chap at my old sports club was William Williams, probably dead now as he was in his 90s, 10-15 years ago so not a new thing.

And more famously among football fans Neville Neville.
 

Xenophon PCDGS

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One of the boys in one of my son's class in the 1980s at St Ambrose College, Hale Barns, had the first name of Grieg, but this was his parents whilst liking the name Greg chose to "enhance" it by adding the letter "i".

Needless to say, the nickname of "concerto" was soon in use, to the despair of the boy concerned.
 

Springs Branch

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My wife is a teacher and has become used to the trend to non-traditional names over the past number of years - surnames used as christian names, named after a car/motorbike, and no prizes for guessing which football team young Chelsea's father supports.

What really "does her head in" is when parents choose one of these names and make up their own mangled spelling for it.

So, Taylor is not unusual these days, but less so if the child is given the named Tayla.
Georgia is a nice girl's name, but what about spelling it Jorja?

This is not due to them choosing, for example, the Spanish or Hungarian version of a name. It's usually the chavvy parents who do it, and they get very irate if anyone at the school ever gets their made-up spelling wrong.

--- old post above --- --- new post below ---

One of the boys in one of my son's class in the 1980s at St Ambrose College, Hale Barns, had the first name of Grieg, but this was his parents whilst liking the name Greg chose to "enhance" it by adding the letter "i".

Needless to say, the nickname of "concerto" was soon in use, to the despair of the boy concerned.
In the reverse direction, one of my former work colleagues in the UK was a direct descendent of the composer Edvard Grieg, but his father or grandfather had decided to anglicise the family name and he went by the surname Greg.
 
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krus_aragon

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A friend of a friend is called Johnathon Johns,
A chap at my old sports club was William Williams, probably dead now as he was in his 90s, 10-15 years ago so not a new thing.

This was very common in Wales, as when English-style surnames were introduced most took their father's christian name as their surname. Couple that with a small pool of common names through to the early 20th century, and you've got your John Jones, Evan Evans, Richard Richards, Thomas Thomas, William Williams, Owen Owens, Hugh Hughes, etc.
 

Cowley

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The father of the former Manchester United players, Gary and Phil, was called Neville Neville. He died not so long ago.

I would've thought that Edward Woodward would've been mentioned wouldn't you?
 

Cowley

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I was in the garden of my old house in one of the less salubrious area of Exeter shall we say, when one of the neighbors over the back wall shouted at her daughter "ELEKTRAAA! Get in ere now"!!
That was a new one on me. Most of the girls there seemed to be called Chelsea and most of the boys Tyler.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
The father of the former Manchester United players, Gary and Phil, was called Neville Neville. He died not so long ago.

Jason Manford did a funny piece about Neville Neville where he said he'd applied for a job and put his surname in the wrong box and just had to go with it :)
 

TheKnightWho

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On the other hand, very old fashioned names being revived is a bit of a thing as well: Hedwig, Torquil, Rupert, Zachary and Theodora are people I've all met who are in their early 20s or younger.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
I was in the garden of my old house in one of the less salubrious area of Exeter shall we say, when one of the neighbors over the back wall shouted at her daughter "ELEKTRAAA! Get in ere now"!!
That was a new one on me. Most of the girls there seemed to be called Chelsea and most of the boys Tyler.

Better hope she doesn't meet an Oedipus ;)
 

cb a1

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I prefer good old traditional christian names to the modern crap you get now. They're proper names, like Ben Dover, Joe King, Mike Hunt, Phil McCrevice etc etc.
I mind when I first heard that a wean was going to be called Shiloh Pitt and didn't believe it!
 

Jona26

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Even 'traditional' christian names can cause a child problems in life. My stepfather was in the same class at school with a pair of twins whose surname was Ness. Their respective first names were Andrew and Peter.

Let's just say giggles were often heard during register calling .
 

backontrack

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They were the two who immediately came to my mind as well! Will the next naming after a fruit be Bananas or Blueberries?

Well, Gwyneth Paltrow's daughter is called Apple. Apple!
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
That's true. There are also a huge variety of Kieron's out there (there must be at least 5 spelling variations I've heard).

One of them's a cycling event! :lol:
 

TheKnightWho

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The worst I've ever heard were two brothers - Chris and Andrew - with the surname Peacock.

Chris Peacock Andrew Peacock

Not very well thought through by the parents...
 
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