[Techy] Wireless Network Connectivity

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47205

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Right, yesterday I purchased a Belkin 802.11g Desktop PCI adapter to replace my bust Netgear one. Fors some odd reason the Router (D-Link DSL-G604T) doesn't really want to interact with this one, any suggestions why?
 
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Tom B

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Assuming everything is plugged in, installed etc (you'd be surprised)

What sort of security are you running? It may be you need to give the router the MAC address of the new wireless NIC.

Failing that, get out the Cat 5 ;).
 

Tom B

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I don't get on well with Cat5 at all - took me about 8 attempts to wire a working patch cable last time I tried ;).
 

bloogrape

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i had a 3com wireless router which become more hard work than effort, the first unit blown up inside last night and stopped working after since friday, i returned it today and swapped it for a new one which i have now which has a fault, it wont come out bootup mode,

Tomorrow i shall buy the Netgear 54 ADSL Router and hopefully not get problems like yourself, although i cant see that happening as im getting the Netgear USB adaptor
 

Tom B

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Having said that about Cat5, I'd much prefer it to wireless kit. Why do people buy wireless networking kit when Cat5 would od them fine? (Well obviously it's because wireless is what's promoted by our lovely friends at AOL etc).
 

traveller1030

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Cockfosters said:
Having said that about Cat5, I'd much prefer it to wireless kit. Why do people buy wireless networking kit when Cat5 would od them fine? (Well obviously it's because wireless is what's promoted by our lovely friends at AOL etc).
Say you've got one NTE in your house in the livingroom, and the comp's in your bedroom many metres away - running Cat5 round the house nowadays isn't to everyone's taste, with the advent and price-point of 802.11 (OK, it's not as cheap as Cat5 but not prohibitively expensive either) I can understand why people go for wireless networking solutions.
 

Techniquest

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We'd have a mini wireless network in our house too, if my brother's PSP and the PC with its BT Voyager 2091 would co-operate...

Bloody technology, let's throw all this s***e out of the window and start back on something decent, like this PC used to be, then it one day had a strop and doesn't do much at all anymore. Even opening Word whilst having WMP open is too much work now to do seemlessly, the music being interrupted during the process now. Takes around 3 minutes to boot up too, compared to last year's 30 seconds!

All in all, technology here is getting ridiculous. I wish the Windows 95 PC worked properly still, we'd never have had to get rid of it. But some important files got deleted...

Anybody fancy donating to the Give FGWFan A Decent Working PC Fund? ;)
 

The Snap

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Hi,
I have a wireless network, but it is made by NETGEAR. I don't know if the two are similar, as we had trouble getting ours set up. We had the problem you had, as we couldn't get connected on the two PCs with receivers. We found out that you must have your network encrypted (we used WEP) to be a ble to connect. Maybe that is something to consider...
Also, is your reciever the same make (and compatible) with you router?
 

The Gricer

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Cockfosters said:
Having said that about Cat5, I'd much prefer it to wireless kit. Why do people buy wireless networking kit when Cat5 would od them fine? (Well obviously it's because wireless is what's promoted by our lovely friends at AOL etc).
For once I agree with Cockfosters! :shock: :lol:

I have Cat5 running round the house. A wired network gives you a reliable, high speed and secure network, which is more than can be said for a lot of wireless networks going by some of the horror stories I've heard from friends and colleagues.

Frank
 

bloogrape

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The Gricer said:
Cockfosters said:
Having said that about Cat5, I'd much prefer it to wireless kit. Why do people buy wireless networking kit when Cat5 would od them fine? (Well obviously it's because wireless is what's promoted by our lovely friends at AOL etc).
For once I agree with Cockfosters! :shock: :lol:

I have Cat5 running round the house. A wired network gives you a reliable, high speed and secure network, which is more than can be said for a lot of wireless networks going by some of the horror stories I've heard from friends and colleagues.

Frank
setup correct and you'l have no problems with security, WPA is the strongest form of encryption! able todo 256Bit!


It go's for anything and i beleive this... if you dont know what your doing dont do it!

Also do the SSID hide mode if you can, makes it that much harder...

Ive switched to linksys router and didnt get the netgear.
here is some usefull information for you noobs

http://www-uk.linksys.com/servlet/S...213950&pagename=Linksys/Common/VisitorWrapper BASICS

http://www-uk.linksys.com/servlet/S...213988&pagename=Linksys/Common/VisitorWrapper
SECURITY
 

Tom B

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bloogrape said:
The Gricer said:
Cockfosters said:
Having said that about Cat5, I'd much prefer it to wireless kit. Why do people buy wireless networking kit when Cat5 would od them fine? (Well obviously it's because wireless is what's promoted by our lovely friends at AOL etc).
For once I agree with Cockfosters! :shock: :lol:

I have Cat5 running round the house. A wired network gives you a reliable, high speed and secure network, which is more than can be said for a lot of wireless networks going by some of the horror stories I've heard from friends and colleagues.

Frank
setup correct and you'l have no problems with security, WPA is the strongest form of encryption! able todo 256Bit!


It go's for anything and i beleive this... if you dont know what your doing dont do it!

Also do the SSID hide mode if you can, makes it that much harder...

Ive switched to linksys router and didnt get the netgear.
here is some usefull information for you noobs

http://www-uk.linksys.com/servlet/S...213950&pagename=Linksys/Common/VisitorWrapper BASICS

http://www-uk.linksys.com/servlet/S...213988&pagename=Linksys/Common/VisitorWrapper
SECURITY
Have I really disagreed with you that much before Frank?!

As for WPA being secure, you can get much more secure if you don't have physical connection to the network.
 

The Gricer

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bloogrape said:
setup correct and you'l have no problems with security, WPA is the strongest form of encryption! able todo 256Bit!
Yes, I know all that, but the point is that people don't always take the trouble to set their wireless network up securely. As long as it works they don't even think about the bloke next door being able to read their mail, use their internet connection or worse.
Then with a wired network you don't have problems with dead spots in the house, or with losing your connection as other people in the house move about.
Then there's the point Tom made about spending extra cash on wireless gear when a wired connection would serve them just fine. Except of course for it being the 'in' thing to have.
I realise of course that for some folk a wireless network is just the thing for them if they like to use their laptop in the bath (not recommended! :shock: ) or on the loo or such like.

Cockfosters said:
Have I really disagreed with you that much before Frank?!
No, not really. More the other way round. In particular I don't always agree with your strong anti Microsoft stance. I actually quite like a lot of Microsoft stuff (even if I don't agree on Microsoft's company policy). But then each to their own. I'm always open to debate and willing to listen to the other blokes point of view. ;)

Frank
 

Mojo

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I've got a wireless network here and I find it really useful, being anywhere in the house and online.
It allows me to sit in the kitchen whilst I'm cooking, sit on the table doing work, if I'm doing something important on the toilet, or just for taking part in those infamous late-night conversations :P
 

Tom B

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WEP alone isn't secure. If you sit in a block of flats in London with a decent 802.11g card (if they called them 802.11g networks would people get them? I suppose it sounds less trendy) you can see loads of unsecured networks, or ones which are pretected with just WEP - these can be steamrollered through (Knoppix seems to have a habit of getting into any 802.11x network with ease). WPA *is* stronger but as I said with an 802.11x network you can "knock on the door" from anywhere in range. With a wired network you can only use specified plug points - and these can be strictly controlled. MAC address filters can be applied to both, but again physical constraints are harder to overcome than digital ones.
 

traveller1030

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Network security isn't one of my strong points (yet), but you are referring to a local intrusion over 802.11 - I get far more worked up over exploits and intrusions that originate as an incoming connection over the Internet, which are a far bigger risk if you aren't patched or firewalled - and a lot aren't, from single-user homes to 100k+-user enterprise environments. My solution - less buggy code and more rigourous testing! Shame there doesn't appear to be many developers that follow that ethos anymore.
 
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