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TfL consultation - Crossrail Central operating section

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plcd1

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A new consultation has turned up from TfL. It is about TfL's desire to make the central section of Crossrail "specialised infrastructure". This is a device under the Railways Act which effectively prioritises the capacity of the infrastructure for high frequency metro services and to pretty much restrict the ability for anyone else to secure paths on the infrastructure. This ensures that TfL have the ability to operate the planned services and secure the revenues to pay back the required financing of the infrastructure.

https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/rail/crossrail-cos

Overview
We are seeking your views on our proposal to designate the Crossrail Central Operating Section as “specialised infrastructure” pursuant to Regulation 25(2) of The Railways (Access, Management and Licensing of Railway Undertakings) Regulations 2016.

In the pdf below there is a diagram of the proposed service frequency and service patterns (peak and off peak). It also provides a track diagram for the TfL owned section.

https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/rail/crossrail-cos/user_uploads/16.08.09_specialised_infrastructure_designation_consultation.pdf

1 Purpose of this consultation
1.1 Regulation 25(1) of The Railways (Access, Management and Licensing of
Railway Undertakings) Regulations 20161 (the 2016 Regulations) requires that all infrastructure capacity must be available for use of all types of rail transport services which conform to the characteristics necessary for use of that infrastructure, as defined in the infrastructure manager's network statement.
1.2 An infrastructure manager may pursuant to regulation 25(2) of the 2016
Regulations designate particular railway infrastructure for use by specified types of rail service and, once the infrastructure is so designated, may give priority to that specified type of rail service in the allocation of infrastructure capacity.
1.3 Transport for London (TfL) considers it necessary to designate the Crossrail Central Operating System (CCOS) as specialised infrastructure for use by high capacity metro passenger rail services. This designation is required to ensure that the Crossrail project realises the benefits that it was conceived, designed and is being constructed to deliver.
1.4 The purpose of this consultation, therefore, is to set out further information in relation to the CCOS, explain why such a designation of specialised infrastructure is necessary and seek feedback from those required to be consulted on their views regarding the proposed designation.
 
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ComUtoR

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This is a device under the Railways Act which effectively prioritises the capacity of the infrastructure for high frequency metro services and to pretty much restrict the ability for anyone else to secure paths on the infrastructure.

Doesn't that create a monopoly ?
 

pdeaves

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It sure does. Then again, why would anyone else want to run services through the centre tunnels?

There are periodic proposals to rub longer distance services through the central section (e.g. Bristol-Norwich, or some such). Whether they would ever be worthwhile is open to debate, but an open access operator may want to.
 

plcd1

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Doesn't that create a monopoly ?

No it doesn't. The consultation makes clear that TfL are seeking to prioritise the use of the infrastructure for Crossrail services. It also states that it believes the construction of the platforms in the underground sections are not compatible with the operation of freight services. Further on in the consultation TfL clearly state that they are not seeking to prevent access to other services if capacity is available.

5.5 In relation to regulation 25(3)(c), TfL confirms that the designation will not prevent the use of the designated infrastructure by other types of rail transport service when capacity is available.

The key reason for seeking the designation is to ensure Crossrail's planned services can operate thus meeting the objectives of the Mayor's Transport Strategy, delivering the expected benefits from the project and delivering the much needed revenue to pay off an element of the project funding. If you think about it it does make sense to ensure the core services can run as set out.
 

Chris125

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There are periodic proposals to rub longer distance services through the central section (e.g. Bristol-Norwich, or some such). Whether they would ever be worthwhile is open to debate, but an open access operator may want to.

I can't believe anyone with knowledge of Crossrail would seriously suggest such services - completely impractical.
 

fgwrich

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Just out of question, what form of signaling system will be fitted to the Crossrail Tunnels - And do we know what form it would have had in the original (and I still feel more sensible!) BR Plans?

Would it rule out for example, late night cross London freights hauled by something like a 90 or 88 if fitted with the required signaling?
 

swt_passenger

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Just out of question, what form of signaling system will be fitted to the Crossrail Tunnels - And do we know what form it would have had in the original (and I still feel more sensible!) BR Plans?

Would it rule out for example, late night cross London freights hauled by something like a 90 or 88 if fitted with the required signaling?

Crossrail core signalling is a Siemens communication based train control (CBTC) system, so to a certain degree similar in operating principles to recent installations on LU such as the Victoria and Northern, although a different manufacturer.

But the important thing to note is that it is supposed to be only a transitional system towards a future ETCS Level 3. TfL were unwilling to take the risk of installing an unproven ETCS variant.

There's a recent article here:
http://www.railengineer.uk/2016/01/08/signalling-crossrail/
...that describes all the different signalling areas, the two main line branches are different to the core and each other, which is why as I pointed out in a recent thread Crossrail cannot find the space for GW ATP.

It would seem highly unlikely that any main line locos would be fitted.
 
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