The Peaks - Loco History/Photos

Discussion in 'Photography Sites, Blogs & Videos' started by JohnW1, 27 Dec 2019.

  1. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    The Peaks

    Being born in Nottingham in 1956 and having lived in the Nottingham area for all my life the class of engine that I most associate with my youth has to be the British Railways Type 4, more commonly known as the Peaks. The Peaks actually consisted of three similar but slightly different batches of locomotives that were given three separate class identities. The ten Class 44 locomotives (D1 – D10) were the initial Pilot series locomotives. These were followed by the one hundred and twenty seven Class 45 locomotives (D11 – D137) and finally the fifty six Class 46 locomotives (D138 – D193) fitted with Brush electrical equipment. The first locomotives entered traffic in 1959 and construction finished in 1963. Withdrawals commenced in 1976 but the last locomotive was not withdrawn until 1989. Below in service life length order is a brief history of each locomotive.

    D115 (45067), Entered Traffic 8/61, Withdrawn 7/77, Broken Up 6/80
    Although not the first Peak to be withdrawn, with a service life of 15 years, 11 months D115 (45067) holds the number one spot for shortest service life. Although a number of Peaks had survived serious accident damage in the 1960’s and early 1970’s by 1977 this was becoming less likely and proved to be the case when 45067 was damaged in a collision with a derailed coal train at Bennerley on the Erewash Valley. Although the damage was not considerable, repair was denied and 45067 was withdrawn in July 1977. It was broken up by Derby Works during June 1980.

    D142 (46005), Entered Traffic 12/61, Withdrawn 12/77, Broken Up 3/78
    Holding second spot for the shortest service life at 16 years is D142 (46005). At the end of the 1977 summer timetable 46005 was stored unserviceable at Laira and rather surprisingly repair was denied and it was withdrawn in December 1977. During January 1978 it made its way to Derby Works who immediately stripped it of usable parts and unusually for Derby Works then broke it up immediately during March 1978.
    46005 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5707860317/

    D161 (46024), Entered Traffic 3/62, Withdrawn 4/78, Broken Up 10/78
    Holding third spot for the shortest service life at 16 years, 1 month is D161 (46024). In April 1978 46024 was involved in a minor collision at Hereford and although the damage was not considerable, repair was denied and 46024 was withdrawn in April 1978. It was broken up by Derby Works during October 1978.

    D3 (44003), Entered Traffic 9/59, Withdrawn 7/76, Broken Up 8/76
    Holding fourth spot for the shortest service life at 16 years, 10 months is the first to be withdrawn D3 (44003) Skiddaw. In 1962, following a short career as passenger locomotives, generally on West Coast Main Line duties the ten Pilot series locomotives were allocated to Toton for freight traffic in the East Midlands. From then until withdrawal the Class 44's would be synonymous with Toton, in general only working to the limits of the route knowledge of Toton's goods link drivers and usually on out and back turns. 44003 was withdrawn in July 1976 and its end came quickly as by the end of September 1976 it had been broken up by Derby Works.
    44003 – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5528101869/
    44003 – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5631454289/

    D140 (46003), Entered Traffic 11/61, Withdrawn 10/78, Broken Up 3/80
    Holding fifth spot for the shortest service life at 16 years, 11 months is D140 (46003). It would spend the first half of its career predominantly on the old Midland Railway lines being allocated to Nottingham, Toton and Holbeck. In 1971 a major fleet re-organisation occurred and 46003 was part of a batch of class 46 locomotives transferred to Bristol Bath Road as replacements for the then rapidly disappearing diesel-hydraulic fleet on the Western Region. This was followed by a transfer to Laira in November 1972. In the summer of 1978 it suffered a major bogie fire and was sent to Derby Works for evaluation. The result was withdrawal in October 1978 and it was broken up at Derby Works in March 1980.
    46003 – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/12450694933/
    46003 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/19631833089/

    To be continued
     
    Last edited: 29 Dec 2019
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  3. LMS 4F

    LMS 4F Member

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    On a visit to Derby works with a family friend who worked there in management I saw the frames laid out for the first ten Peaks sometime in the late 1950s. As I recall they all had a number chalked on at least one frame. I would have been about 11 years old.
     
  4. Peter Mugridge

    Peter Mugridge Established Member

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    Would the chalked numbers have been the works numbers or the allocated painted numbers ( presumably D1 to D10 in this case )?
     
  5. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    D1 (44001), Entered Traffic 8/59, Withdrawn 10/76, Broken Up 2/77
    D6 (44006), Entered Traffic 11/59, Withdrawn 1/77, Broken Up 2/77
    Holding the sixth and seventh spots for the shortest service life at 17 years, 2 months are two of the Pilot series, the first of the class D1 (44001) Scarfell Pike and D6 (44006) Whernside. In 1962, following a short career as passenger locomotives, generally on West Coast Main Line duties the ten Pilot series locomotives were allocated to Toton for freight traffic in the East Midlands. From then until withdrawal the Class 44's would be synonymous with Toton, in general only working to the limits of the route knowledge of Toton's goods link drivers and usually on out and back turns. 44001 was the second Peak to be withdrawn due to fire damage after failing in the Stoke area on 8L21, Toton – Garston. Its end came four months later being broken up by Derby Works during February 1977. 44006 was the third Peak to be withdrawn and its end came rather more quickly being broken up by Derby Works also during February 1977 only one month after withdrawal.
    44006 – https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/22928339783/

    D10 (44010), Entered Traffic 2/60, Withdrawn 5/77, Broken Up 7/78
    Holding the eighth spot for the shortest service life at 17 years, 3 months is the last of the Pilot series, D10 (44010) Tryfan. In 1962, following a short career as passenger locomotives, generally on West Coast Main Line duties the ten Pilot series locomotives were allocated to Toton for freight traffic in the East Midlands. From then until withdrawal the Class 44's would be synonymous with Toton. 44010 was was stored at Toton during February 1976 and then withdrawn in August 1976 only to be re-instated in October 1976 as a replacement for 44001. 44010's reprieve ended on the 12th May 1977 when it suffered main generator damage working a Rufford Colliery - Avenue Coking Plant coal train near Mansfield Colliery Junction. It was withdrawn the same month and eventually towed to Derby Works where it was broken up during July 1978.
    44010 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5632033562/
    44010 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5528109001/

    D190 (46053), Entered Traffic 1/63, Withdrawn 2/81, Broken Up 7/81
    Holding the ninth spot for the shortest service life at 18 years, 1 month is D190 (46053). Apart from two spells at Holbeck in 1963/64 and 1967-70 it would spend the majority of its career at Gateshead where it would remain until withdrawn during February 1981. Following withdrawal it was moved to Derby works and broken up during July 1981
    46053 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/8025578403/
    46053 – https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/18603592120/

    To be continued
     
    Last edited: 29 Dec 2019
  6. LMS 4F

    LMS 4F Member

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    As I recall, and it was a very long time ago, it was D1 etc. It was basically body shells painted in a dull red colour to the best of my memory.
    I saw most ot them much later but my boyhood interest in all things railway was somewhat finished for many years by the introduction of Diesels and DMUs. Girls may have been another factor.
     
  7. 70014IronDuke

    70014IronDuke Established Member

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    I think this is slightly misleading. It was more than just the year 1962. The very first 44s (as they became) initially started out on St Pancras - Derby - Man Central services as I understand it, but it seems this was only for a matter of a couple of months at most, and for the later ones ie D8 - D10, it may have been a couple of weeks or even days. I assume this period on the Midland was deemed necessary for monitoring performance of the new locomotives, and to be able to rapidly check with engineers based at Derby for any mods required.

    I'm pretty sure that by the summer of 1960 at the latest, all were allocated to WCML depots (somewhat randomly all over the place, from Camden to Crewe, Edge Hill and Longsight, maybe Kingmoor/Upperby too). They were certainly off the Midland. I can only assume this was to relieve 8P pacifics from the heaviest duties ASAP, either because of a desperate need to reduce operating costs and/or because of labour shortages affecting the ability of sheds to service big 4-cylinder pacifics. And, of course, the 44s had about 15% more oomph than the 40s, which was surely useful if taking 15-coach trains up the WCML, as was the norm back then.
     
  8. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    Apologies if you found this a little misleading. I have amended the wording to better reflect what I intended:

    "In 1962, following a short career as passenger locomotives, generally on West Coast Main Line duties the ten Pilot series locomotives were allocated to Toton for freight traffic in the East Midlands."
     
  9. hooverboy

    hooverboy Member

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    midland mainline haulage was typically 45/0 or 45/1.

    If I remember correctly the 44's had the de-rated sulzer engine @2300BHP.
    45's and 46's had the more powerful 2500BHP version,plus ETH heating instead of steam.

    44's also used to have the "disc" headcode lights,instead of the alphanumeric boxes.
     
    Last edited: 29 Dec 2019
  10. Peter Mugridge

    Peter Mugridge Established Member

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    Thanks, and that matches what I saw 30 years ago at Crewe works when the 90s and 91s were marked up with their painted numbers in chalk when little more than frames!

    The dull red paint sounds like a standard metal undercoat, so that makes sense as well.

    Please keep the analysis of each locomotive's history coming. It's fascinating.
     
  11. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    I believe the 45s and 46s had a slightly later development of the Sulzer engine which gave the extra 200hp.
    But also it was only the 45/1s that were converted to ETH (ETS). The 45/0s and 46s were all originally built with steam heating.
     
  12. Bevan Price

    Bevan Price Established Member

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    I would also comment that D1 - D10 (the Class 44s) were all fitted with steam-heating boilers when new, but these were all removed when they moved to Toton. I thought it a great shame that the lower-powered Class 40s were preferred to Peaks for the very heavy WCML passenger services.
     
  13. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    I have read somewhere that the original Peaks (class 44s) could show a pretty good turn of speed. Do you or anyone else remember travelling behind them?
    I assume @70014IronDuke must have done?
     
  14. 70014IronDuke

    70014IronDuke Established Member

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    It wasn't that the 44s were 'de-rated' - they were the norm. The 45s and 46s were rather uprated.

    They 2,500 HP machines had intercoolers fitted between the turbocharger and the cylinders. This cooled the intake air, making it more dense, ie more oxygen per unit volume, and hence allowing more fuel to be burned per firing stroke of the piston. IIRC, D2 was temporarily thus fitted as a testbed for the uprating early on. I think maybe some odd bits and pieces, including the cylinder heads, may have been strengthened to take the extra stresses caused by the uprating.
     
  15. 70014IronDuke

    70014IronDuke Established Member

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    No, I never travelled on them or behind them from memory. Nor worked on them when at Toton. where they were very reliable locos. IIRC they typically did something like 44,000 miles per casualty in the early 1970s, about four times better than the 45s - although the latter's mpc figure was dragged down by steam boiler failures.

    I would be very interested in seeing reliable performance logs on both the Midland and WCMLs, but can't remember ever seeing any whatsoever.
     
  16. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    That’s an interesting insight from yourself there (as always).
    Very high miles per casualty figures for those days I would imagine?
    They must have been impressive machines when new.
     
  17. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    Although a Railway Signalling Engineer by trade in the mid 70's we still use to travel to out of the way signal boxes by catching lifts on freights. In 1975 I was involved in works at Syston, Leicestershire and would get there by catching a freight from Loughborough. Very often it was a Class 44 (although a Class 25 occasionally and once an tamping machine). Once the driver realised you were a bit interested in the loco they would let you have a drive, with 900 tons of coal in unfitted wagons behind you. Unfortunately I did not record which ones I have driven although I think 44004 was one.
    I suspect the MPC was helped by the fact that due to the nature of their work (generally class 9 freights) they rarely got above 30mph, were not generally "common user" and therefore had a relatively captive group of traincrew and belonged to one depot for nearly all there lives.
     
  18. 70014IronDuke

    70014IronDuke Established Member

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    Well, thank you! <Blush>
    Yes. Cl 37s also had excellent MPC figures, at least in S Wales - where they were employed largely on similar duties to the 44s when at Toton, of course. I don't know about the GE 37s, when they were used on Liverpool St - Kings Lynn and other passenger services.

    I think that the first 30 months or so of the Cl 44 lives, ie temporary introduction on the MML, followed by 2 years or so on the WCML is really an era of diesel history that is more or less entirely undocumented. True, any high-speed/high output exploits would surely have relied upon initial late running - with 2,300 HP available, they could have handled MML timings with ease, ditto the WCML. But I would love to see eg a log of a Cl 44 on the down Royal Scot starting out of Crewe 30 down, or leaving Leicester similarly late on an up Manchester - St Pancras express.

    Gosh. I know a friend of mine (a ticket clerk) used to get footplate rides on the MML and managed to get a 47 on one of the peak extras up to 104 mph near Flitwick in the late 1990s, but letting a non-driver drive an unfitted freight is, I'd have thought, a bigger risk. Of course, I'm sure the drivers concerned kept a close eye on you!

    Oh, for sure - all of these aspects helped. I remember discussing this with a friend who was responsible for the Sulzer 4s at Derby. We really questioned the economics of withdrawing the 44s so early, given their reliability. But that was the policy of 222 Marylebone Rd (or was it Eversholt House?) and so it was done. No doubt the drop off in mineral traffic in the 70s made it all the easier.
     
    Last edited: 30 Dec 2019
  19. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    D178 (46041), Entered Traffic, 9/62, Withdrawn 12/80, Broken Up 8/83
    D179 (46042), Entered Traffic, 9/62, Withdrawn 12/80, Broken Up 12/82
    D180 (46043), Entered Traffic, 9/62, Withdrawn 12/80, Broken Up 5/84
    Holding tenth, eleventh and twelfth spot for the shortest service life at 18 years, 3 months are D178 (46041), D179 (46042) and D180 (46043). Allocated on delivery to Gateshead all three locomotives would spend virtually their entire careers allocated to this depot and all three locomotives were stored at Swindon Works at the end of the 1980 Summer Timetable and withdrawn in December 1980. They were not among those reinstated at the end of 1981 and would languish at Swindon Works until finally broken up between December 1982 and May 1984.
    46041 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/7674507826/
    46042 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/18822878680/
    46042 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/25463969025/
    46042 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/29179822810/

    To be continued
     
  20. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    D171 (46034), Entered Traffic 7/62, Withdrawn 11/80, Broken Up 11/82
    D177 (46040), Entered Traffic 8/62, Withdrawn 12/80, Broken Up 4/82
    Holding thirteenth and fourteenth spot for the shortest service life at 18 years, 4 months is D171 (46034) and D177 (46040). Allocated on delivery to Gateshead both locomotives would spend their entire career allocated to this depot and both locomotives were stored at Swindon Works at the end of the 1980 Summer Timetable. 46034 was withdrawn in November 1980 and 46040 was one of five Class 46 locomotives withdrawn in December 1980 from those stored at Swindon Works awaiting their fate. Neither was amongst those reinstated at the end of 1981 and the Swindon cutting torches beckoned with 46034 being broken up at Swindon Works during November 1982. However one final journey remained for 46040. During the first week of January 1982 recently reinstated 46032 was in Derby Works for power unit repairs and 46040 was sent up to Derby from Swindon as a source of spares to assist with the repair. By April all useful parts had been recovered and the remains of 46040 were broken up by Derby Works.
    46040 - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/7674504768/
     
  21. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    D5 (44005), Entered Traffic 10/59, Withdrawn 4/78, Broken Up 11/78
    Holding the fifteenth spot for the shortest service life at 18 years, 6 months is another of the Pilot series, D5 (44005) Cross Fell. It was built at Derby Works and entered traffic in October 1959. In 1962 following a short career as passenger locomotives generally on West Coast Main Line duties the ten Pilot series locomotives were allocated to Toton for freight traffic in the East Midlands and had their steam heating boilers removed. From then until withdrawal the Class 44's would be synonymous with Toton. in general, only working to the limits of the route knowledge of Toton's goods link drivers and usually on out and back turns. 44005 was withdrawn at the end of April 1978 with generator damage and was initially stored at Toton but moved to Derby Works on the 31st July 1978. It was broken up at Derby Works during November 1978.
    44005 – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5528693004/
    44005 – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/5792756338/

    To be continued
     
  22. JohnW1

    JohnW1 Established Member

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    D149 (46012), Entered Traffic 12/61, Withdrawn 7/80, Broken Up 10/80
    D167 (46030), Entered Traffic 5/62, Withdrawn 12/80, Broken Up 11/82
    Holding the sixteenth and seventeenth spots for the shortest service life at 18 years, 7 months are D149 (46012) and D167 (46030). By the summer of 1980 only three class 46 locomotives had been withdrawn (46003/05/24 with collision or fire damage) and although class 46 locomotives were still generally up to the tasks demanded of them the introduction of the HST’s, the reduction of traditional freight traffic flows and the steady delivery of new freight locomotives meant that there days were numbered. Although Derby Works continued to undertake classified repairs until January 1981 the withdrawal program commenced in July 1980 when 46012 was withdrawn with a cracked frame. 46012 was towed to Swindon Works and broken up within three months of withdrawal during October, the first Class 46 to be broken up at Swindon. 46030 was one of the Class 46 locomotives stored at Swindon at the end of the 1980 summer timetable and arrived for storage at Swindon during November 1980. It was officially withdrawn in December 1980 and was not among those reinstated at the end of 1981. It would languish at Swindon until finally broken up in November 1982.
    46012 – http://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/6334015498/
    46030 – https://www.flickr.com/photos/pics-by-john/14056048271/

    To be continued
     

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