Train Crash near Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Discussion in 'International Transport' started by Seagulls01, 24 Jul 2013.

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  1. johnnychips

    johnnychips Established Member

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    I wouldn't think it unreasonable for a documentary to present the facts of an accident and then speculate on possible causes. I hope it's not too sensationalist.

    Just think about Lady Diana, when the facts and causes are known and there's still a slurry load of cr*p coming out.
     
  2. jon0844

    jon0844 Veteran Member

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    Wasn't there a premature Air France documentary, followed by one later after the black boxes had been found and the whole story became known?
     
  3. fsmr

    fsmr Member

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  4. edwin_m

    edwin_m Veteran Member

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    If the title is anythg to go by then that programme won't be up to much. "Spains worst rail disaster" by most measures would appear to be this one:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torre_del_Bierzo_rail_disaster

     
  5. starrymarkb

    starrymarkb Established Member

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    There was indeed, IIRC it showed the pilots wrestling with *Yokes*



    (For those that don't know Modern Airbii from the A320 onwards have a small sidestick for control instead of a Boeing Style Yoke)
     
    Last edited: 30 Sep 2013
  6. fsmr

    fsmr Member

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    It was premiered tonight at 22-00 on Discovery and seemed a fairly balanced prgm with lots of UK rail professionals input. It would seem a classic case of a driver distracted (by mobile) and then loosing spatial awareness of his location and speed until it was too late
    The bit concentrating on why the front and rear gen sets went over etc first was irrelevant as that would also be the case with a British IC125 or any other D/E loco with high centre of gravity
    At the end of the day, there was no safety back up in place so a lapse of driver concentration or for that matter a deliberate act would only end up with one conclusion on such a severe curve
     
    Last edited: 6 Oct 2013
  7. jon0844

    jon0844 Veteran Member

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    It didn't really reveal much, if anything, and had plenty of padding. But, that said, it did have input from people that explained why the driver can't be held 100% responsible, and that the job of a driver isn't as easy as I expect many people think.

    I still think it was a bit too early to make the programme, specifically because it's still under investigation, but I suppose this just means there will be another 'seconds from disaster' type show made then.

    Nice to see the trainline advertised during the programme.
     
  8. edwin_m

    edwin_m Veteran Member

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    I didn't see the programme but I'm not sure I agree with that. The genset probably does have a similar centre of gravity to non-Talgo trains but is much less stable than the rest of the Talgo, which is very low-slung and likely to have a lower centre of gravity than pretty much any other passenger train. It would be interesting to know if Talgos without gensets have taken this curve too fast before without serious consequences.
     
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