Trains running with one headlight lit.

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John1976

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Simple question with probably a good explanation behind it;why do so many trains run with only one headlight lit during daylight hours. Any reasons?
 
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hairyhandedfool

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The headlight is so people can see the train before it gets too close, only one is needed for that purpose so only one headlight is used. However, trains should also have marker lights lit whilst moving, these are much less bright and sometimes barely visible in daylight.
 

BestWestern

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The headlight is so people can see the train before it gets too close, only one is needed for that purpose so only one headlight is used. However, trains should also have marker lights lit whilst moving, these are much less bright and sometimes barely visible in daylight.

Thankfully the new generation of higher intensity headlamps, found on new stock and in replacement lighting clusters seen on older stock, are an awful lot better than the old kit and do actually also offer the Driver some useful degree of illumination of the line ahead.
 

ainsworth74

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However, trains should also have marker lights lit whilst moving, these are much less bright and sometimes barely visible in daylight.

And on modern stock (I'm thinking post-privatization) the 'cyclops' headlight at the top of the unit in the middle should also be lit.
 

Minilad

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Simple question with probably a good explanation behind it;why do so many trains run with only one headlight lit during daylight hours. Any reasons?

They don't. One headlight but one marker light and possibly even a high level light (depending on age of stock) will also be lit
 

185

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Day head is on the secondman's side, night head is under the driver. The small marker lights should also be lit.

Day head is to notify those on the track that a train is approaching.

Night head is also to notify of a train approaching, and to light up trackside warning boards / speeds.

An overhead 'cyclops' lamp looks good but is not a requirement.
 

swt_passenger

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An overhead 'cyclops' lamp looks good but is not a requirement.

I think you mean it isn't a retrospective requirement.

It is required on new stock, according to the relevant group standard, which requires:

C2.2 Marker-lamps
The forward facing front-end of the leading vehicle of a train shall be fitted with three marker-lamps, in a triangular format as set out in Appendix 2 (lamp optical centres within the boxes). It is permitted for one marker-lamp to be the fixed head-lamp in use.

http://www.rgsonline.co.uk/Railway_...ck/Railway Group Standards/GMRT2483 Iss 1.pdf
 

Grantham

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Good road knowledge doesn't require headlamps! Ask any old steam driver.

On my side of the planet (I'd be interested to know what the rule is on yours) there are places where the headlights must be on, and places where they must be off EXEPT for safety. Obviously if there are trackworkers out at night in a blackout area, you put the lights on for visibilty. Equally, when you're next to a highway for miles, you put them on low beam or just use the low level spotties so you don't blind passing motorists.

Most of our locos have small marker lights, a centre twin headlight, and low level ditch lights. If I've added the photo correctly, it will show a train at Baalbone Colliery with the headlights on low beam and the ditch lights on. We're waiting for the mine wallah to finish filling the enormous bin before we drive under and he loads the train. High beam is very bright. Off the top of my head, I think the light globes we use for the headlights (times two) are 350 Watts each, but I would be open to correction.
 

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driver9000

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Good road knowledge doesn't require headlamps! Ask any old steam driver.

On my side of the planet (I'd be interested to know what the rule is on yours) there are places where the headlights must be on, and places where they must be off EXEPT for safety. Obviously if there are trackworkers out at night in a blackout area, you put the lights on for visibilty. Equally, when you're next to a highway for miles, you put them on low beam or just use the low level spotties so you don't blind passing motorists.

Most of our locos have small marker lights, a centre twin headlight, and low level ditch lights. If I've added the photo correctly, it will show a train at Baalbone Colliery with the headlights on low beam and the ditch lights on. We're waiting for the mine wallah to finish filling the enormous bin before we drive under and he loads the train. High beam is very bright. Off the top of my head, I think the light globes we use for the headlights (times two) are 350 Watts each, but I would be open to correction.

UK rules are that the headlight and markers must be on at all times the train is on a running line, they must be turned off when in sidings/depots where the marker lights are used instead. UK headlights aren't overly bright and even the new bright lights don't exactly light up great distances, most of the lights on my trains barely throw 50ft.
 

Legzr1

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Good road knowledge doesn't require headlamps! Ask any old steam driver.

Any old steam driver ran on railways where ESR and TSR's warning boards were lit.

Nowadays they're all reflectorised so a working headlight is required.

I had the (dubious in some cases!) pleasure of working with some of those old sods - the eyesight on some of them meant even 1MW floodlighting was insufficient!

And hearing?!!

There was one old fart with hearing so bad that he constantly tapped his foot on the DSD pedal - the reason?
He couldn't hear that new-fangled vigilance beeping and was fed up of dropping the brake so decided to remove his foot every few seconds throughout the whole shift.

Enough to drive you to madness!!
 

Grantham

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Any old steam driver ran on railways where ESR and TSR's warning boards were lit.

Nowadays they're all reflectorised so a working headlight is required.

I had the (dubious in some cases!) pleasure of working with some of those old sods - the eyesight on some of them meant even 1MW floodlighting was insufficient!

And hearing?!!

There was one old fart with hearing so bad that he constantly tapped his foot on the DSD pedal - the reason?
He couldn't hear that new-fangled vigilance beeping and was fed up of dropping the brake so decided to remove his foot every few seconds throughout the whole shift.

Enough to drive you to madness!!

I'm hearin' ya...there are silly old farts everywhere. Trust me, I know a few!

But I bet they know the road like the backs of their hands, read every notice about speed restrictions before they tread them, and dare I say they can brake from high speed to a station stop in one application, stopping on a rising mercury with their eyes shut! ;)
 

Legzr1

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Possibly,but no amount of reading PON's will tell you where the ESR is placed - especially when the requirement for ESR posted in late notice cases was eased because - you guessed it - all trains have headlights and all ESR wb's are reflectorised.

It's also worth remembering that some 'old sods' bluffed their way for years too - the look on their faces when 'black boxes/Qtron/data recorders' were first mentioned was a picture :D
 

bronzeonion

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I have always wondered this, Class 91's have both headlights and marker lights on all the time, I dont understand why all other trains with similar clusters don't do the same, such as Networkers, most of the MK3 EMU's, early 66's, 67's etc. Not only does it simplify things but looks better too.
 

hairyhandedfool

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I think two headlights was a high speed requirement at one stage, I've only seen it on HSTs.
 
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