Trivia: Interesting or unusual railway stations in other countries.

Discussion in 'International Transport' started by stadlerkiss, 27 Nov 2019.

  1. MarcVD

    MarcVD Member

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    Very nice video. Amazing to notice how bad the track condition is in France compared to Spain... Also, the border is clearly visible, but I saw no "change of railway administration" signs that are normally present at all railway borders.
     
  2. MarcVD

    MarcVD Member

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    Can't answer that one but I can positively confirm that 30 years ago already, french and spanish services all terminated at Latour, so the UIC gauge track saw no other regular service than a weekly tourist train during the summer months. The track was already suffering from deferred maintenance and limited to 30 km/h. I'll see if I can dig out pictures and scan them.
     
  3. westralian

    westralian Member

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    Whitfords and Warwick stations on the Joondalup Line in Perth, Australia both also have bus stations above the platforms.
     
  4. AlexNL

    AlexNL Established Member

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    The station of Breda (NL) does not only function as a railway and bus station, it's also an office (20.000 m² of office space), shopping area (9.000m²) and has 150 homes integrated into its design. Lastly, there are more than 700 parking spots on the building's roof.

    upload_2019-12-1_23-17-17.png
    Aerial photo of Breda (NL) station, courtesy of Google Maps.

    One of those 150 homes is mine. :)
     
    Last edited: 2 Dec 2019 at 00:21
  5. JonasB

    JonasB Member

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    A few from Sweden:

    Sjisjka in the north. A small village (a couple of years ago it had a total population of two inhabitants) that has a platform and where trains stop. A video of the station:


    Abisko Turiststation, another one in the north and as far as I know the only hotel that has its own railway station.

    Västervik, only station that still has standard/narrow dual gauge track (Haparanda has a short stretch of standard/broad gauge).

    Örnsköldsvik, a station built over a ski jumping slope.

    Södertälje has some odd stations as well. The commuter trains from Stockholm end at the central station which is a terminus, but for the trains to reach the station, they have to change direction for the last 1.5 km. Long distance trains stop at the south station that is located in the end of a 2 km long bridge.

    Tobo, a small station that appears to be in the middle of nowhere: https://goo.gl/maps/VMmoKBLpkzFChq5U7
     
  6. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    Yes, looks as if the Spanish side had been recently relaid (with the rationalisation at Puigcerda?), but not the French. The next bit towards Barcelona needs it: there is a long emergency 30km/h adding 9min to journey time.
     
  7. pne

    pne Member

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    Pontresina on the Bernina-Bahn in Switzerland is another.
     
  8. scragend

    scragend Member

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    [​IMG]

    Andač, somewhere in Slovakia on the line between Bratislava and Nitra, isn't exactly the world's biggest station. That's the entire station, by the way, there wasn't anything on the other side of the line at all.
     
  9. stut

    stut Established Member

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    Heh, reminds me of a visit to Ljubljana, in the late 90s. We'd arrived by train from Koper, and were headed to a campsite over the river. As it happened, there was a train about to leave in that direction, so we got a ticket and hopped on, rather than trying to figure out the bus system. We then arrived into Ljubljana Črnuče:

    [​IMG]

    You can see something approximating a platform at the top right. Yeah, that's not where we stopped, we stopped on this track on the right, and only just figured out we were at a station when we saw others getting off and noticed the sign, leaping out with backpacks just as the train was about to move again.

    This isn't that unusual. I've also caught a train from Prague-Smichov, heading up on the branch line through Zlicin (this has now been converted to light rail, with a new stop in front of the station). To get to the platform, you had to head through the (frankly rather decrepit) main station, up a tiny staircase out the back, then wait with a crowd on the edge of what looked like a marshalling yard. As the train pulled in, you clambered over the tracks to find it, then howked yourself up the steps.
     
  10. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    That's the other detached station I was thinking of back at #7.
    A few years ago the "Prague Semmering" trains started from a tiny platform called Na Knizeci at the far end of a derelict goods yard, but convenient for a bus station and tram stop. They currently leave from (somewhere near?) a platform by the Regiojet carriage sidings called "Smichov West Platform" (and run through from Hlavni).
    Then there's Prague Bubny, where they extended the service into a goods siding, built a "platform" and called it Bubny Vltavska - simply to make a convenient interchange with Vltavska Metro station during engineering works (which is still in use). Shows what's possible with ground level platforms :)
     
  11. raetiamann

    raetiamann Member

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    For years we've been visiting the island of Lindau, in the south west corner of Bayern, which is arrived at via a causeway. The Hbf has until now been accepting electric trains from the Swiss and Austrian federal railways, journeying round the lake from Bregenz in Austria. Meanwhile the German trains, which greatly outnumber the electrics are diesel hauled, either DB or ALEX trains. Only platforms 1-3 are electrified and the Swiss have a small number of Re4/4 11 locos specially adapted to run under German centenary.

    Approval has been granted to electrify the line from here to Munich, and so this uniqueness will soon end, though trains towards Kempten and Friedrichshafen will continue to be diesel hauled. Adjacent to the station is the harbour on Lake Constance, where there are regular departures to destinations around the lake, and of course the bus station.
     
  12. rangersac

    rangersac New Member

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    This was certainly the case when the City Loop opened, but now the Hurstbridge and Mernda lines (red lines) only travel around the loop in a clockwise direction. I believe this decision was because the tunnel portal required a flat crossing in the AM to access which often resulting in delays to outbound services
     
  13. raetiamann

    raetiamann Member

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    When I was in Melbourne for AusRail in 2015, there was much talk of a second river crossing. Is that going ahead?
     
  14. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    The line to Friedrichshafen and Ulm is also being electified ATM, while a new statin is being built at Reutin on the mainland allowing IC/EC trains to avoid the reversal. Hbf remains for regional trains, and the Kempten route stays diesel.
     
  15. rangersac

    rangersac New Member

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    Yes, it's part of the Metro tunnel project: https://metrotunnel.vic.gov.au/
     
  16. raetiamann

    raetiamann Member

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  17. alex397

    alex397 Member

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    I think Liechtenstein's railway needs a mention. A very basic service, with 4-5 trains a day on Mon-Fri, mostly during 'peaks' but there is one around midday which I observed earlier this year (very few people got on/off). The main station in the country is Schaan-Vaduz, with just one platform, and the station looked unstaffed. The capital Vaduz doesn't have a station, the closest being at Schaan (hence the station name). It is operated by OBB, the Austrian state railway, with 2 car (I think they were 2 car) trains.

    Schaan-Vaduz has quite a traditional historic building (which I think still had a waiting room inside), right opposite the very modern bus station at Schaan. Plenty of other trains pass along this line, without stopping in Liechtenstein. There are 2 other stations on the line

    This contrasts to the frequent and modern bus network, which even includes double-deckers. On my observations, it seems most people enter/ exit the country by train at Buchs (Switzerland) or Feldkirch (Austria) and use the buses which are much busier.

    If you ever visit Innsbruck, it's possible to visit Liechtenstein on a day trip which is what I did. It was certainly a bizarre experience (in a good way!)
     
  18. JonasB

    JonasB Member

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    Maybe Hallstatt should be mentioned as well. Where the railway station is on the other side of the lake from the village and you need to take a ferry to get to the train.
     
  19. AlbertBeale

    AlbertBeale Member

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    Yes - bizarre little country; operates almost as part of Switzerland for some purposes (eg currency [and buses] - though it is officially part of the EEA, as Austria is, whilst Switzerland isn't), and almost as part of Austria for others (eg railways).

    The 4-5 trains a day mentioned are indeed outnumbered by all the other trains running through Lichtenstein, day and night, which almost never stop there - namely the international trains on the one and only east-west [OK - actually pretty wiggly in those parts] route between Austria and Switzerland.
     
  20. Beebman

    Beebman Member

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    Another piece of trivia about the route is that ÖBB continues to own the infrastructure for another 900m or so on the Swiss side of the border with Liechtenstein as this SBB official diagram shows:

    buchs.jpg

    Source: http://bt9.ch/files/ausf__hrungsbestimmungen_ab_fdv_2012.pdf (page 40 of 291; page 90 shows something similar happening at St.Margrethen with the SBB/ÖBB infrastructure boundary)
     
  21. 181

    181 Member

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    Prague Hlavni: The historic station building is cut off from the city by a dual carriageway, and you enter through a modern building on the city side of the road; if you look up when on the way to the platforms, you find that you have passed under the road and are in the bottom of the old building, but if I remember rightly it's not obvious unless you look up.
     
  22. AlbertBeale

    AlbertBeale Member

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    That's right - the magnificent old Art Nouveau station building (from which you can still access the platforms) is hidden away above the new (as is currently in vogue) underground-shopping-mall-with-a-railway-station-attached. It's the one place on the station which is a quiet [it's largely ignored by the locals, from what I could see], attractive place to stop for a coffee if you have time before your train. But it is indeed well hidden: from the new station entrance hall (and metro access) - which incidentally trashed half of the park; what's left of the green space there is pretty miserable - you go down (to what's underneath a main road) to the [double-level, if I remember correctly] mall-plus-station-facilities, and from there, to get to the platforms, you're sent on through a depressing tunnel until you get to the steps up to your platform (platforms which are themselves devoid of any facilities). But if you ignore the route through the tunnel, and can find the one appropriate up-escalator/stairs from the mall, you can go up to this gloriously attractive old building at platform level. (Though it only provides direct - ie without having to go up and down stairs - access to one platform.)

    Incidentally, the city's first (19th century) main station, not far away, and now used for regional trains - Praha Masarykovo n - does still have its lovely original frontage on display from the road. But be careful of the trams running past if stepping back into the road to admire the building in slippery weather; I nearly came a cropper!
     
  23. Gag Halfrunt

    Gag Halfrunt Member

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