Trivia: Redundant railway infrastructure built post WW2

Mcr Warrior

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Any examples of significant investment in GB railway infrastructure opened since the Second World War but now closed / largely redundant.

For example...

The "new" double track Woodhead Tunnel (Opened 1954, closed 1981).

Waterloo International (Eurostar) platforms. (Opened 1994, closed 2007).

Must be a few others out there...
 
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LowLevel

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Cotgrave Colliery branch, Rectory Junction, near Nottingham. Built 1960 including a large concrete viaduct, out of use since the 1990s following the closure of the colliery.

Bletchley Flyover - technically in use but never really as intended.
 

SynthD

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Waterloo International is in use, but the junctions connecting it to HS1 (Queenstown Road and Fawkham) are redundant.
 

SargeNpton

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Cotgrave Colliery branch, Rectory Junction, near Nottingham. Built 1960 including a large concrete viaduct, out of use since the 1990s following the closure of the colliery.

Bletchley Flyover - technically in use but never really as intended.

Bletchley Flyover will come back into use with East-West rail. Some of the spans are currently being renewed.
 

Tomos y Tanc

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There must be plenty of old industrial lines that were constructed post war. Just round here I can think of the Ford Motor Company branch in Bridgend built in the 1970s and the branch lines and sidings at Aberthaw power station built in the late 1950s, both now redundant.
 

yorksrob

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The route between Cheriton and Folkestone Central was quadroupled as part of the Kent electrification scheme in the early 60's. Since then, two tracks have gone, along with some of the new stabling sidings at Folkestone junction, whilst the up island platform at central is now out of use. Due mainly to the loss of boat train traffic.
 

HowardGWR

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How this subject qualifies as 'trivial' defeats my understanding of English. Many of the aforementioned projects were huge investments, later seen as money wasted. Some thought so at the time.

Portbury dock was for a long time a white elephant, but made it, eventually, just about. This was more due to it having been built and thus not to waste an existing asset, so the branch line was upgraded.
 

yorksrob

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Grain station was rebuilt in 1958 (I think) with quite a substantial island platform then closed in 1962. I don't think it was a vast investment though.
 

bluenoxid

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How this subject qualifies as 'trivial' defeats my understanding of English. Many of the aforementioned projects were huge investments, later seen as money wasted. Some thought so at the time.

Portbury dock was for a long time a white elephant, but made it, eventually, just about. This was more due to it having been built and thus not to waste an existing asset, so the branch line was upgraded.
It is trivia, not trivial :)
 

ashkeba

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One famous example is the tightest curve on the UK railway at Themelthorpe. Built 1960, closed 1985, now part of a hiking and cycling trail called Marriott's Way
 

30907

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Grain station was rebuilt in 1958 (I think) with quite a substantial island platform then closed in 1962. I don't think it was a vast investment though.
1951, replacing Grain Crossing Halt and Port Victoria, allowing the latter to fall into the Medway be closed. Probably paid for itself.
Your Folkestone example just upthread is interesting, as it's a relatively rare example involving passenger trains.
 

yorksrob

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1951, replacing Grain Crossing Halt and Port Victoria, allowing the latter to fall into the Medway be closed. Probably paid for itself.
Your Folkestone example just upthread is interesting, as it's a relatively rare example involving passenger trains.
The Folkestone example was part of the Kent electrification scheme, which was an excellent investment as a whole. The Folkestone bit just got superceded by the channel tunnel.
 

Philip Phlopp

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Any examples of significant investment in GB railway infrastructure opened since the Second World War but now closed / largely redundant.

For example...

The "new" double track Woodhead Tunnel (Opened 1954, closed 1981).

Waterloo International (Eurostar) platforms. (Opened 1994, closed 2007).

Must be a few others out there...
Woodhead Tunnel is neither closed nor largely redundant, and it's more useful to the railway now than it would be if it still had trains running through it.

It carries the power lines that eventually reach the Stalybridge substation and the Heyrod feeder.
 

Dr Hoo

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The Gelderd Road Curve in Leeds was a new passenger line initiated in the Beeching era (albeit opening after he had left) that didn't last very long.
 

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