Trivia: Smallest towns with more than one station

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Parallel

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Dinas Powys has two - Dinas Powys and Eastbrook. The population was listed as about 7,500 in 2011.
 
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Ryde (pop 32,000) has three stations, all with the word ‘Ryde’ in them.
Oh of course, and Smallbrook just on the edge, so pushing it you could say 4
Smallbrook station post code is Ryde PO33 4BE, it is in Ryde.
At 32,000 people Ryde has a 8,000 to 1 ratio, and there are plans to increase this to 5 stations once the new estate at Westridge cross is built.
 

Phil from Mon

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Arthog
Eight including two on the Cambrian Coast Line
Strangely, there is no station called 'Arthog', the station of that name was on the closed line towards Dolgellau
That must be the most stations per inhabitant, maybe?
Struggling with this a bit. If there are two on the Cambrian Coast and one was Arthog what are, or were, the other five?
 

Par

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Smallbrook station post code is Ryde PO33 4BE, it is in Ryde.
At 32,000 people Ryde has a 8,000 to 1 ratio, and there are plans to increase this to 5 stations once the new estate at Westridge cross is built.

Never mind Ryde, what about Hyde?
Population 34,000 - 6 stations
Hyde North
Hyde Central
Newton (for Hyde)
Godley
Hattersley
Flowery Field
 

Grecian 1998

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Whilst hardly a small town, I've always found it rather odd that Worthing has West Worthing, Worthing and East Worthing stations all within 2 miles of each other on the same line. Always seems slight overkill. Then again there are 12 stations in 13 miles between Brighton and Goring. I realise it's a built up area but it does seem excessive for a two track railway with very few passing places connecting to Southampton and Portsmouth.


On the West Highland line, after it diverges at Crianlarich. I think the gradients are quite steep, hence the names Upper Tyndrum and Tyndrum Lower.

Certainly the line towards Fort William climbs more and is at a higher altitude. Upper Tyndrum was called Tyndrum Upper until the late 1980s when radio signalling was introduced - it was changed to make it more distinctive from Tyndrum Lower.
 

AlbertBeale

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Whilst hardly a small town, I've always found it rather odd that Worthing has West Worthing, Worthing and East Worthing stations all within 2 miles of each other on the same line. Always seems slight overkill. Then again there are 12 stations in 13 miles between Brighton and Goring. I realise it's a built up area but it does seem excessive for a two track railway with very few passing places connecting to Southampton and Portsmouth.

Although there are only(!) 3 stations with "Worthing" in the name, there are actually five stations in the local authority area (borough) of Worthing - the others are Durrington and Goring-by-Sea.

Of course the definition of a "town" hasn't been set out in the question: it could be the relevant post town (ie where the name appears as part of the address - though that itself is an ill-defined thing, and addresses can take different forms and have varying levels of detail, and still be valid addresses), or it could be the administrative area of that name, or it could be the limits of the relevant built-up area of the settlement of that name, or it could be the parliamentary constituency of that name....


Acton (wiki says population 24k) has 7 stations.
Acton is hardly what I’d class as a small town...

I can't imagine what definition of "Acton" wiki uses to suggest that only 24k people live there! Certainly not a definition of Acton that encompasses all 7 stations.

Acton might be the answer to "Which place has the most stations named from it?" - but that's a different question.
 

London Trains

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Acton might be the answer to "Which place has the most stations named from it?" - but that's a different question.
The answer to that is obviously London!

London Blackfriars
London Bridge
London Cannon Street
London Charing Cross
London Euston
London Fenchurch Street
London Kings Cross
London Liverpool Street
London Marylebone
London St Pancras International
London Victoria
London Waterloo
London Waterloo East

London Fields
London Road Guildford
London Road Brighton

Other places in London with more than four stations named after them are:

Acton Main Line
Acton Central (LO)
South Acton (LO)
West Acton (LU Central Line)
North Acton (LU Central Line)
East Acton (LU Central Line)
Acton Town (LU District/Piccadilly Lines)

West Hampstead Thameslink
West Hampstead (LU Jubilee Line)
West Hampstead (LO)
South Hampstead (LO)
Hampstead Heath (LO)
Hampstead (LU Northern Line)

Ealing Broadway
West Ealing
North Ealing (LU Piccadilly Line)
South Ealing (LU Piccadilly Line)
Ealing Common (LU Piccadilly/District Lines)

West Ruislip
South Ruislip
Ruislip Gardens (LU Central Line)
Ruislip (LU Piccadilly Line)
Ruislip Manor (LU Piccadilly Line)

Harrow and Wealdstone
Harrow on the Hill
North Harrow (LU Metropolitan Line)
West Harrow (LU Metropolitan Line)
South Harrow (LU Piccadilly Line)
 
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YorksLad12

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Yes but there is no station named just 'London' :s
..
I think Cyffordd Dyfi/Dovey Junction should win
One station, no residents!

Double win for Dovey Junction then...!
 

Maude673

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What about Plockton - easily reached on foot from both Plockton and Duncraig stations. Not going to be better than Tyndrum but it’s close with a population of 378.
 

Strathclyder

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Clydebank (est. population of 25,970 as of 2018) has a total of five stations within it's boundaries: Dalmuir, Clydebank (of course), Singer (named after the former sewing machine factory it was built to serve), Drumry & Yoker. The last of these is a slightly odd one: it's a stone's throw from the West Dunbartonshire/Glasgow council boundary (sitting squarely in the former's territory) and considered part of Clydebank, with Yoker itself falling under Glasgow City Council control.

Speaking hypothetically, if the station were ever to be renamed on the basis of it's actual geographical location, I feel Whitecrook would be a better fit. Who knows, given the Yokerburn housing estate in whose shadow the station sat is now no more (the last of the estate's 3 towers was flattened eariler this year, delayed by you-know-what), maybe a renaming will take place.

On that note (and I'm aware this is very unlikely to happen, I'm again speaking hypothetically), if Singer were ever renamed on a geographical basis, I'd wager the most likely candidates for such a renaming would be: Clydebank North, Kilbowie, Kilbowie Road or Radnor Park. As alluded to above, this is very unlikely to actually happen for several reasons. Chief among these is that the former Singer sewing machine factory forms a key part of the town's history and the station retaining that name is a nod to that history. And even if it were to be renamed, people would continue to call it Singer (like the Glasgow Underground/Subway, Elizabeth Tower/Big Ben and arguably the best-known example of this trope in recent times, the Willis/Sears Tower).

Annnyway, getting back on-topic...
 

WestRiding

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South Elmsall (West Yorkshire) also has Moorthorpe at the other end of the town. Both usable for South Elmsall.
 

Dr_Paul

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Well, Heath Row, from which the airport derives its name, doesn't even have a population large enough to be classed as a village... so if we're looking for towns, then I don't think it counts. I can't even find a figure on its population.

The village of Heathrow was completely demolished when the airport was built, so I think we should rule this one out of the game as it no longer existed when the stations were built.
 

Surreyman

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Ewell, Ewell East & Ewell West stations, I lived used to live there, Ewell was always known as a village (Yeah ok, it is now a big suburb technically in Surrey but really part of outer Greater London sprawl).
 

DelW

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The village of Heathrow was completely demolished when the airport was built, so I think we should rule this one out of the game as it no longer existed when the stations were built.
Such as it was, anything left is pretty much underneath terminal 3 and its aircraft stands:
Screenshot_20200930-094639_Chrome.jpg
(screenshot of comparison between old OS map and current aerial view)
 

daodao

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Similarly, what about Llanishen and Ty Glas both being in Llanishen? Whitchurch and Coryton both being in Whitchurch?
Whitchurch railway station is actually in Rhiwbina, which has its own station, a few hundred yards nearer to Cardiff.
 

MadMac

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Clydebank (est. population of 25,970 as of 2018) has a total of five stations within it's boundaries: Dalmuir, Clydebank (of course), Singer (named after the former sewing machine factory it was built to serve), Drumry & Yoker. The last of these is a slightly odd one: it's a stone's throw from the West Dunbartonshire/Glasgow council boundary (sitting squarely in the former's territory) and considered part of Clydebank, with Yoker itself falling under Glasgow City Council control.

Weren’t there seven stations in the Burgh at one point?
 

ijmad

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Helensburgh has two, three if you include Craigendoran (20 mins walk away). Population 15,430.
 
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