Trivia: Stations that don't sound like they're Spelt

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Mutant Lemming

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I suppose this has probably been done before but the Bache thread (I used to call it after the bread product at first) had me wondering what other stations don't sound like they are spelt ?
Milngavie is one of those that seem to be most different. Then there are the Norfolk ones - Wymondham (there was Hunstantion). I thought Syston was along the lines of a WC. There used to be Gateacre.
Some are easy to work out where the pronunciation is either a shortening or pronoucning letters out of character but how did Milngavie get to be pronounced the way it is?
 
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aformeruser

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Slaithwaite (West Yorks) pronounced Slough-wit

Buscough (Lancashire) which has 2 stations is pronounced Burs-koh. It's the same for the place/given names Ainscough and Myerscough and works on the same principle as the last part of Scarborough not being pronounced the same as "borough council" yet a lot more people have trouble pronouncing the Lancashire names correct.
 

jwos

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Westhoughton and Wemyss Bay spring to mind, and either one of the Gillinghams, depending on where you're from.
 

Gathursty

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Being unfortunately ignorant of the Welsh language, probably more than half of ATW's range.

How do you pronounce Penrhyndeudraeth by the way?
 

westcoaster

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I suppose this has probably been done before but the Bache thread (I used to call it after the bread product at first) had me wondering what other stations don't sound like they are spelt ?
Milngavie is one of those that seem to be most different. Then there are the Norfolk ones - Wymondham (there was Hunstantion). I thought Syston was along the lines of a WC. There used to be Gateacre.
Some are easy to work out where the pronunciation is either a shortening or pronoucning letters out of character but how did Milngavie get to be pronounced the way it is?


gatwick is gat-wick while flitwick is flit-ick
 

175001

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When I 1st moved from Wales to Manchester to work for Northern, Mytholmroyd, Slaithwaite and Hall'i'th'wood gazumped me.

Gathursty, if you get on my train one day i'll say it to you as I'm a Welsh speaker, but phonetically is Penryn-dei-dra-eth
 

Gathursty

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When I 1st moved from Wales to Manchester to work for Northern, Mytholmroyd, Slaithwaite and Hall'i'th'wood gazumped me.

Gathursty, if you get on my train one day i'll say it to you as I'm a Welsh speaker, but phonetically is Penryn-dei-dra-eth
You had me at 'Penryn'. ;) Hahaha!
 

Ivo

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On LUL, Plaistow is a well-known one. The "plai" bit is pronounced in the same way that a local would pronounce "plant" (without the "nt" at the end of course).

PLARstow
 

Schnellzug

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Well, what about Loughborough and Leicester? In fact, if you add Derby as well, you've got a whole string of consecutive stations that would confuse foreign tourists (apart from East Midlands Parkway, perhaps).
 
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'Luxulyan' (Par - Newquay)
(LuckZillyun)
Luxulyan Valley, with it's Aqua/Viaduct (still carries water) - worth a day trip!

Roche (pronounced like the remainder of a joint)
Fowey, the railway may have been responsible for the present spelling!
Foy, Foye,
Fowy - in use in late 20's
Pronounced Foy.
There is no longer a station, but the railway remains.
 
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TheEscapist_

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A lot of tourists can't say Leuchars, they either say 'Leushars' or 'Louchars'. Stranraer is another one.

Sent from my LT18i using Tapatalk 2
 

table38

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Have we done Geordieland yet?

Prudhoe (Prud-huh)
Heworth (Hyoo-wurth)

spring to mind!

Oh and Sunderland (Sunderlan) :)

And that place near Brighton that's pronounced "Hove Actually"
 

bAzTNM

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Gilshochhill in Maryhill in Glasgow ends up being pronounced as "Gilshyhill", or am I hearing the on-board announcement wrong?
 

LNW-GW Joint

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The TOCs can't even agree on Bache.
Merseyrail (on the train) say Baitch (which is right).
But the (English) ATW announcer at Chester says Back (which is lamentably wrong).

I once asked for a ticket to Gunnersbury (NLL) in my northern brogue, and the (London) clerk didn't know where I meant. Eventually he realised I meant Gansbry.

Euxton near Preston is a funny one (apparently it's Exton, not Euston with an x in).

Then there's Greenwich and Greenock not being the same.
Gillingham (Kent, soft G) and Gillingham (Dorset, hard G).
Dalry on the Ayr line is apparently Dalr-eye rather than Dalr-i.

And that's before all the Welsh versions of English placenames, many of which bear no relation to each other (eg Amwythig for Shrewsbury).
They are always placed first on ATW trains, even in England on purely local trains such as Crewe-Chester (Cryw-Caer).

Nowt so queer as folk...
 
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