Trivia: train with most passengers?

Discussion in 'UK Railway Discussion' started by telstarbox, 20 May 2015.

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  1. telstarbox

    telstarbox Established Member

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    Southern/Southeastern run some 12-car 375/377 services - are these the 'busiest' trains in the UK?
     
  2. samj

    samj Member

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    I think one of the Woking-London Waterloo SWT services was up there, as the most overcrowded train and carrying about 1,100 passengers. Must be one of the top 5 at least.
     
  3. cjohnson

    cjohnson Member

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  4. HilversumNS

    HilversumNS Member

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    I'm guessing that we're talking UK here, but I suspect that some trains in Japan have a very high density: https://youtu.be/J3XucXFyml8
     
  5. bignosemac

    bignosemac Established Member

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    Isn't PIXC* the measurement?

    Passengers in excess of capacity*.

    Train length isn't necessarily a factor.



    *Google either of those for some further information.
     
  6. jopsuk

    jopsuk Veteran Member

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    London Midland, Thameslink Great Northern (both lines), AGA (Both WAML and GEML), C2C, South Eastern, Southern and South West Trains all run 12 car services in the peaks. The only mainline London commuter operators that don't are FGW (including HEC/HEX), Chiltern and LO.
     
  7. AM9

    AM9 Established Member

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    How do modern high-density commuter trains compare, i.e. 378s, LU S class. I know that the question was for trains with the most passengers but a fully loaded wide through-gangway train probably exceeds the 12-car outer suburbans per linear train length even though passengers would be more comfortable.
    This will become apprent when the real high density outers arrive, i.e. the 700s and 345s. The 700s may be expected to carry 1500-1700 passengers in the peaks. Then the problem shifts to platforms and station access handling their ingress and egress.
    --- old post above --- --- new post below ---
    PIXC is a DfT figure to address perceived passenger comfort expectations, (presumably for use by politicians) and is compared to the TOCs franchise requirements.
    Where a service is infrastructure limited, it is more an indication of train types being suitable for the passenger flows.
     
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