Tyne & Wear Metro Fleet Replacement: Awarded to Stadler

hacman

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Joined
22 Jul 2011
Messages
208
So from what I can tell, the confusion is around wether the brakes use magnetic force to actually slow the train, or just use magnets to release a big rubber shoe that actually slows the train?

My instinct is that it's probably a big rubber shoe, because as much as I love the metrocars, they aren't the cutting edge of technology :lol:

Eddy brakes does seem like a good idea. I'm presuming new trains will have the train equivalent of ABS.

PS. If they wanted to go full Elon Musk, just replace the whole thing with roller-coaster technology, have linear induction motors to push the cars in and out of the stations with 3G of acceleration/deceleration. Would reduce journey times across the board!

No more worries about leaves on the line neither!

The magnetic element is primarily the application, rather than the means of speed retardation - they are still a friction device. This can be seen in the video posted above - the sparks that the application generates are due to friction between the brake shoe and the rail.

The eddy current brakes are very smart but do require some signalling hardware to be hardened due to the nature of their operation. I'd imagine we may see the new HS2 rolling stock feature these, and I believe the Eurostar e320s already have them being part of the Siemens Velaro family.

Some rail systems have been tested with LIMs. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombardier_Innovia_Metro lists a few, and the people mover attraction at Walt Disney World is also a good example.)
 
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chiltern trev

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28 Mar 2011
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near Carlisle
The option for extra units sounds promising, or it did until the present situation blew up.

The current flexibility to operate a single unit may be missed.

The size of this order compared with Berlin puts things in perspective. We can't produce sufficient substantial regular orders to keep British rail manufacturers production lines open over the long term. This order seems to have dragged on for a very long time.

Could you please advise where the option for extra units is stated.

[English translation courtesy of Google Translate (EOE)]

METRO EMU

Nexus, Tyne and Wear, UK


Nexus, a rail operator in the north-east of England, ordered 42 new METRO trains from Stadler in January 2020. The new vehicles will be used on the Tyne and Wear Metro network in the region around Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, South Tyne-side, North Tyneside and Sunderland in the north-east of England. The light five-part railcars enable efficient and inexpensive operation. The new vehicles require considerably less energy, which is due to their lightweight construction, the recovery of braking energy and the modern and highly efficient traction converters. Power is supplied via an overhead linewith 1500 V DC. The vehicles are also prepared for the integration of an energy storage system and can therefore also be used on expansion routes that may be added at a later date. The vehicles are designed for a top speed of 80 km / h. The interior of the vehicles is bright and open. There are special multifunctional areas for wheelchairs, strollers, luggage and bicycles. The interior concept will improve passengers' sense of security through video surveillance, protection systems for door operation and clear warning displays. Good thermal and acoustic insulation ensures a comfortable room climate, newly developed bogies with air suspension lead to an improved driving experience.


Technical features
Technology
- Light car body made of extruded profiles
- Outstanding collision safety ensures safe mixed operation in full rail Traffic
- Newly developed Jakobs motor bogies and barrel bogies with air suspension
- Disc and magnetic rail brakes
- Modern vehicle control technology
- Automatic front coupling for multiple traction
- Swivel sliding doors and sliding steps for entry at ground level
- Low energy consumption thanks to lightweight vehicles, braking energy recovery and modern traction converters
- Thanks to powerful traction batteries, emergency operation does not depend on the energy supply. The vehicles are prepared for the later installation of a large energy storage system, with the help of which they can also be operated on catenary-free extension lines

Comfort
- Bright, passenger-friendly interior with a unique design
- Eight entry doors per side for rapid passenger flow
- Ground level access to all entrances thanks to sliding steps
- Generous multifunctional areas and wheelchair spaces
- Modern passenger information system and VSS
- Powerful air conditioning and underfloor heating

Staff
- Generous cab over the entire width with excellent lines of sight for the driver
- Automatic side door for easy access to the cab

Reliability / availability / maintainability / security
- Redundant traction equipment with maintenance-friendly, water-cooled IGBT converters
- Remote vehicle diagnostics to support condition-based maintenance

Vehicle data
Customer Nexus
Field of application Tyne and Wear Metro
Track width 1435 mm
Description METRO EMU
Supply voltage 1500 V DC
Axle arrangement 2 '(Bo)' (Bo) '(Bo)' (Bo) '2'
Max. Axle load 12.5 t
Suspension (secondary / primary) air suspension + rubber-metal spring element
Number of vehicles 42
Commissioned in 2023/2024
Seats (2nd class only) 104
Folding seats None
Standing room 493
Floor height 940 mm SOK
Entry width 1400 mm
Longitudinal compressive force 800 kN
Length over coupling 59 900 mm
Vehicle width 2650 mm
Vehicle height 3445 mm
Bogie axle stand
Motor bogie 2200 mm
Bogie 2000 mm
Drive wheel diameter, new 720 mm
Impeller diameter, new 720 mm
Continuous power at the wheel 942 kW
Maximum power at the wheel 1320 kW
Starting traction 140kN
Starting acceleration gross 1.35 m / s²
Braking distance service braking 250 m
Braking distance emergency braking 150 m
Top speed 80 km / h

Any further info on what "The vehicles are also prepared for the integration of an energy storage system and can therefore also be used on expansion routes that may be added at a later date. The vehicles are designed for a top speed of 80 km / h." means?

Although 25kv has not been stated, do these units have passive provision for 25Kv or battery or...?
 

hacman

Member
Joined
22 Jul 2011
Messages
208
Could you please advise where the option for extra units is stated.



Any further info on what "The vehicles are also prepared for the integration of an energy storage system and can therefore also be used on expansion routes that may be added at a later date. The vehicles are designed for a top speed of 80 km / h." means?

Although 25kv has not been stated, do these units have passive provision for 25Kv or battery or...?

Paragraph two on this article advises of the option, but doesn’t state the option quantity. That said as this is a custom build it’s not likely fixed to a certain number.


Nexus have already increased the order to 46 trains following successful funding of the Metro Flow project.

25Kv AC support was dropped from the specification early on, though there may exist passive provision in the design.

There is battery power included for shunting and emergencies in the base build, with the option to expand this for full IP-EMU operation later on.
 

D365

Established Member
Joined
29 Jun 2012
Messages
7,922
25Kv AC support was dropped from the specification early on, though there may exist passive provision in the design.

There is battery power included for shunting and emergencies in the base build, with the option to expand this for full IP-EMU operation later on.
I imagine it would be something like the Class 450, where the units are 25kV-capable but would need modification in order to accommodate the added transformer and pantograph mass.

The inclusion of battery power makes sense, sounds like the Class 777 for Merseyrail.
 

simple simon

Member
Joined
13 Feb 2011
Messages
579
Location
Suburban London
These trains (and indeed previous generations of Tyneside Electric trains) will feature in a future issue of the magazine Railways Illustrated. This will be in spring 2021, but I am not sure which month.
 

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