Understanding TOPS allocation lists

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TicketMan

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Every now and then, both here and elsewhere, someone posts a list of locos with their current allocations - i.e. where they are, and what they are doing now and next. But unless you know what you are looking at, it is just a load of codes.

So here goes. I will use the following example:

Code:
60032  Wcan  Troste      796b29ce24   1 *  Margam Tc    N   6b03     7d A
60032 is obvious - it's the loco number

WCAN is the pool the the loco is allocated to on TOPS

Troste is the origin for it's current working - in this case Trostre Works, in South Wales.

796b29ce24 is the headcode for the loco's current working. Most of the time you will see headcodes expressed in the format 1A23, however that is actually a shortened version - in this case the shortened headcode is 6B29

1 * I have no idea about, but it's not important for most of us

Margam Tc is the destination for the current working (6B29 remember)

6B03 is the shortened headcode for the next train this loco will work when it arrives at Margam

7d A simply means that this loco is next due an A exam in 7 days

Hope that helps someone
TM

P.S. If posting this elsewhere please let me know and credit me thanks
 
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RJ

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Hi Ticketman.

Suppose something like this was showing:

60032 WCAN Llanwern EastUsk

With no headcodes or anything, where is 60032 currently?
[EDIT]
(Hoping for 6A21)
 

TicketMan

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Not sure how that works, Joe - I think that happens when a loco runs without a headcode, i.e. dead in train, or something like a banking loco (the Bromsgrove banker routinely runs l/e without a headcode)

I think the loco should be at the last named location, but don't quote me on this.

TM
 

ikar

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joea1 said:
Hi Ticketman.

Suppose something like this was showing:

60032 WCAN Llanwern EastUsk

With no headcodes or anything, where is 60032 currently?
Most regions don't time light loco runs under 2 miles, although I don't know the geography there so couldn't say.
 

LucaZone

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Is this system used in more than just the UK? or does each country have its own system?

Plus are these class types just UK specific as well?
  • Light Engine
  • Express Passenger
  • 90Mph Freight
  • 75Mph Freight
  • Empty Stock
  • 60Mph Freight
  • 45Mph Freight
  • Low Speed Freight
  • International
 

AlexS

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They all have different systems - even for a Eurostar service, if it's head code going out of London is say, 9I03, when it enters the French half of the Chunnel it will be down on their system as train 9103.
 

ikar

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In Croatia we have:
EuroCities (European international trains)
InterCities (Domestic express trains)
Fast trains
Regional trains
Local trains
----
Express freights (international)
Fast freights
Other freights


The train numbering system is different in Europe a standard is used, because of the large amount of inter-work.

Passenger numbers are generaly lower numbers. In local/regional workings first states the area (4-Rijeka and Pula lines/Karlovac area) of working while the second digit states the line (6-Rijeka - Moravice locals/7-Pula line trains etc.) the last two state the number of the train...
Express ones have lower numbers - belove than 500 are international trains; 5xx series are IC's; 7xx are express trains, while 14xx are fast trains; 1xxxx are International - non regular workings (summer int. trains; DB auto train...)

Freight has 5 digits - they are ussually the same meaning as the passenger ones:

4xxxx are International freights; 5xxxx is ussualy longer distance ECS (not between depot and station); 6xxxx are regular and fast freights.
 

metrocammel

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TOPS was originally created in the early 60's by the Southern Pacific railroad company, as a way to eliminate paperwork- by having it all computerised.

Also, Do you know what a class 99 was on TOPS? (I think they have been removed now however) (hint it doesn't run on rails ;) )
 

RJ

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Further to Ticketman's post, just dug this up, headcode info

37510 EN ROUTE WILSDNBNT TO DUNGENESS ON 726O62C528 DEP WILSDNBNT 0545 28/12

The first two digits are the same as the first two digits of the origin stannox
The next digit is the Class of the train ie 6 is a 60mph freight
The letter symbolised the destination i.e O is usually Kent, Surrey or Sussex
The next two numbers are just the ID of the train
The next two figures I'm not sure of.
The last two digits are the day of the month
 

rebel

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The next two figures I'm not sure of.
The two digits after the reporting number are called the T-speed (in this particular case, C5).

They designate whether that particular train is a mandatory train (ie its been planned to run long term), or whether it runs on certain days, or if its a VSTP train (ie a path submitted less than 48 hours before the train was booked to run.

For example, if the first character of the T-speed is M, its a mandatory train that runs every weekday.

ie 321V93MD12 would be 0854 Manchester Bournemouth.

If however the first character of the T-speed is a 1 (or a 2 if the schedule has been altered more than once), it means the schedule has been amended for some reason.

In which case it might read something like:
321V931X12 0854 Manchester - Birmingham New St


Theres a good deal more to it than that, but in its most basic terms, thats it ;)
 
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Further to Ticketman's post, just dug this up, headcode info

37510 EN ROUTE WILSDNBNT TO DUNGENESS ON 726O62C528 DEP WILSDNBNT 0545 28/12

The first two digits are the same as the first two digits of the origin stannox
The next digit is the Class of the train ie 6 is a 60mph freight
The letter symbolised the destination i.e O is usually Kent, Surrey or Sussex
The next two numbers are just the ID of the train
The next two figures I'm not sure of.
The last two digits are the day of the month
The second character of the headcode is the route or destination. The "O" is code for the former Southern Region. The regional codes were, E Eastern, M London Midland, V Western, S Scottish, O Southern. In my TOPS days the letter after the headcode of a freight train was either M for mandatory (the train must run) or C for conditional (runs if traffic requirment dictates it.) As a previous poster has noted the system was bought from the Southern Railroad in the U.S. of A. to get a grip on the appalling rolling stock management on the then B.R. One peculiar abbreviation was for a brakevan which was shown as CAB - meaning caboose!
 
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