Unscheduled stops at stations

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richieb1971

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If a train stops at danger which aligns the train with the platform of a station, the electric doors remain locked. I have seen occurrences where passengers awaiting a train try to get on the "unscheduled stopped" train. They often look confused and get angry the doors won't open and even ask me through the window to open the door. Obviously no announcement for the unscheduled stop.

What would have happened in the 70's and 80's in such conditions? Would the passengers be able to board the train?
 
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47271

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Not exactly your question but, yes, I remember getting off a signal stopped HST with a friend at Broughty Ferry as a teenager. The train restarted without the driver looking back so on reflection it was a stupid thing to do.

As far as I'm aware no railway staff noticed.
 
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Carlisle

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Not exactly your question but, yes, I remember getting off a signal stopped HST with a friend at Broughty Ferry as a teenager. The train restarted without the driver looking back so on reflection it was a stupid thing to do.

As far as I'm aware no railway staff noticed.

There was a rule in those days of unlocked slam door stock where the guard had to give the right away , so I don't think you were in terrible danger
 

furnessvale

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If a train stops at danger which aligns the train with the platform of a station, the electric doors remain locked. I have seen occurrences where passengers awaiting a train try to get on the "unscheduled stopped" train. They often look confused and get angry the doors won't open and even ask me through the window to open the door. Obviously no announcement for the unscheduled stop.

What would have happened in the 70's and 80's in such conditions? Would the passengers be able to board the train?

Wasn't there a case years ago on one of the approach routes to Liverpool St where a train stopped alongside a girder bridge in foggy conditions.

A passenger alighted and walked away from the train only to plunge, possibly to his death, onto the street below.
 

hulabaloo

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What would have happened in the 70's and 80's in such conditions? Would the passengers be able to board the train?

We used to make the most of that commuting from St Mary Cray in the 80s/90s. You knew you shouldn't but it's too tempting when it's an emptier train that'll get you to work twenty minutes quicker.
 

Millisle

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A few years ago I was on an Inverness-Waverley train that was stopped for a good time at Burntisland. There were a good number of passengers awaiting the next stopper. As the delay continued the guard phoned in and permission was given to board them.
 

GrimsbyPacer

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On my trip to Beeston from Grimsby early this month, the class 153 East Midlands Train stopped at Great Coates, the doors didn't open and the light ahead wasn't red.
I assumed it was because Northern were losing the local stopper to Eadt Midlands. The train drove off after 10 seconds.
 

gimmea50anyday

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It has been known for traincrew to make *ahem* unofficial station stops to eject unsavoury passengers. Trouble is now we now have a duty of care, even when the obnoxious abusive twit refuses to pay for their fare and they know there is naff all we can do about it!
 

theironroad

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If a train stops at danger which aligns the train with the platform of a station, the electric doors remain locked. I have seen occurrences where passengers awaiting a train try to get on the "unscheduled stopped" train. They often look confused and get angry the doors won't open and even ask me through the window to open the door. Obviously no announcement for the unscheduled stop.

What would have happened in the 70's and 80's in such conditions? Would the passengers be able to board the train?

Was still happening in early 2000s with southern slam door stock. If the train came to a stand in platform then needed right away from guard.

Trick was not to stop or at times stop off the end of platform if the driver knew he was following something. However, at times you need to be close to signal to read signal plate so had no choice but to stop in platform.

With power door stock rule is as long as door interlock is not lost, then driver can carry on without guard right away (where there is a guard obviously!)
 

6Gman

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It has been known for traincrew to make *ahem* unofficial station stops to eject unsavoury passengers. Trouble is now we now have a duty of care, even when the obnoxious abusive twit refuses to pay for their fare and they know there is naff all we can do about it!

Or to make an unofficial stop to oblige a colleague.
 

TheEdge

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There was a rule in those days of unlocked slam door stock where the guard had to give the right away , so I don't think you were in terrible danger

Rule still exists for CDL stock. Out of course stop in a platform train cannot move until the guard has checked doors are secure. Thats why on GEML peak services some Norwich sets will crawl through certain known bottlenecks, normally Shenfield and or Maryland, if approaching reds. 1mph still counts as not stopped!
 

ChiefPlanner

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"Fast" South Western trains in the days of slam door stock would hold back at places like Wimbledon to prevent incursions of "suburban" passengers. When checked. Best I ever saw was a late up Scottish sleeper "invaded" at Harrow and Wealdstone by late and angry commuters.

Not sure if any of them had a quick 20 min bed rest ....
 

A-driver

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Even with power operated door stock many drivers attempt to avoid stopping at reds in platforms as, with dispatch on high alert and with drivers and guards being prosecuted over things you could be on dodgy ground if someone tries to board and you move off with them falling under the train.

At peak times getting stopped somewhere like Hornsey when not booked to it will be impossible to check it's clear in the mirror so before moving off a driver may have to walk the length of the train to ensure everyone is standing away. Therefore a few drivers stop before the platform. If you can't read the signal plate from there then you can always ask the signaller-saying you are at Hornsey up platform starter signal but can't read the number from where you have stopped is perfectly fine for safety critical communication. The signaller can tell you the signal number.
 

EveningStar

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Five Ways inbound to Birmingham New Street has (or had ... is a while since I have been that way) a signal just beyond the platform and, if I recall, the sectional appendix had a specific instruction about trains not booked to stop being held at that signal. Only experienced that once and it was obvious from way we creeped up to the signal that the driver was hoping, in vain, it would clear before stopping. Noticed that before restart driver was careful to get right away from the guard, who was clearly equally aware.
 

Mag_seven

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Up HST's frequently stop short of the up platform at Reading West if the signal at the Reading end of the platform is at danger. I've seen it happen at Didcot platform 2 as well if the HST is not booked to call.
 

deltic

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Trains from Chester via Northwich into Manchester Oxford Rd were often checked by signals in the morning peak at Deansgate and a significant number of people would alight - since it was a regular occurrence never understood why the stops werent made official.
 

randyrippley

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I was on an Exeter - Waterloo train back in the 1970's which was held at the passing loop at the then-closed Templecombe station. Just at the line cleared and the class 33 powered up, two confused elderly American tourists decided they were at Salisbury and jumped off. They were left standing at the station as the train left, door swinging, with the signal box keeper screaming hopelessly at the driver. Luckily the door eventually slammed itself shut.
No, no-one pulled the cord.
And clearly, neither the driver nor the guard felt the need to check whether anyone had tried to use the closed platform. A few seconds later and things could have been quite serious
 

30907

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I was on an Exeter - Waterloo train back in the 1970's which was held at the passing loop at the then-closed Templecombe station. Just at the line cleared and the class 33 powered up, two confused elderly American tourists decided they were at Salisbury and jumped off. They were left standing at the station as the train left, door swinging, with the signal box keeper screaming hopelessly at the driver.

Very odd for an Up train, since the only signals are on the double track section and the platform is on the single line.

PS and welcome on board, if no one else has said it.
 

D6975

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On a Pompey - Cardiff from TM, a RPO came across two people with no tickets and no means to pay on leaving Temple Meads.
He had a word with the driver and they were dropped off at the convenient location of Pilning. :)
 

tony6499

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The approach signal to Hove on the up was always dodgy with slam door stock as if you had a 12 car and were stopped at it the back coach or so of the train was on Aldrington platform and as a guard you had no chance of seeing if anyone was trying to get on.
 

randyrippley

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Very odd for an Up train, since the only signals are on the double track section and the platform is on the single line.

PS and welcome on board, if no one else has said it.

really? I must admit I thought the platform was at the eastern extremity of the loop. It was years ago though and memory is a fickle thing. It matters not - the fact of them getting off at an unscheduled stop was the problem

That was the same trip where on the return that evening, the driver overshot Tisbury station at speed and had to reverse to allow passengers off. That was a fast stop!

and thanks for the welcome
 

47271

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Wasn't there a case years ago on one of the approach routes to Liverpool St where a train stopped alongside a girder bridge in foggy conditions.

A passenger alighted and walked away from the train only to plunge, possibly to his death, onto the street below.
A slightly more humorous version of this is a story I'm sure I read in the Croydon Advertiser in the 1990s, and I may have told this in another thread a few months ago, I'm not sure.

A drunk was travelling back to East Croydon from Victoria one dark evening. The slam door train was held at a signal north of the station and, for reasons best known to alcohol, he decided that they were already in the platform and got out. He fell onto the trackside, but was miraculously unscathed so climbed back on board, convinced that all he'd done wrong was get out on the wrong side and repeated the process...

I think at that point the assistance of the emergency services was required.
 

furnessvale

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A slightly more humorous version of this is a story I'm sure I read in the Croydon Advertiser in the 1990s, and I may have told this in another thread a few months ago, I'm not sure.

A drunk was travelling back to East Croydon from Victoria one dark evening. The slam door train was held at a signal north of the station and, for reasons best known to alcohol, he decided that they were already in the platform and got out. He fell onto the trackside, but was miraculously unscathed so climbed back on board, convinced that all he'd done wrong was get out on the wrong side and repeated the process...

I think at that point the assistance of the emergency services was required.

I seem to recall your story.

The one I referred to occurred about the time I was lodging in Aldersbrook House at Ilford (some of you may remember it).

That would date it to 1973-1976.
 

306024

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I seem to recall your story.

The one I referred to occurred about the time I was lodging in Aldersbrook House at Ilford (some of you may remember it).

That would date it to 1973-1976.

That's spooky, a passenger was relating that story to me just last week. I'm guessing over the years you can insert Ilford / Croydon / anywhere.

Ah the Ilford Hostel, never lived there but scrounged the odd lunch.
 
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LM stop by the platform at Barlaston on some Sunday Crewe to Euston services to wait for the barriers to be put down on the level crossing
 

Antman

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Gatwick Express's often get signal checked at East Croydon and drivers will crawl along although sometimes have to come to a complete standstill, usually announcements from platform staff deter anybody from trying to board.
 

Ianno87

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Manchester Piccadilly to Glossop/Hadfield trains almost always get checked at the signal approaching Dinting viaduct as they wait for the preceding train towards Piccadilly to vacate the triangular junction.

Back in the days of Class 304/305s being used on the route, the residents of nearby Gamesley cottoned on to this, and would often jump out of the train during the signal check and scramble up the embankment to the estate, to save themselves the trek back from Dinting!
 

BestWestern

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On a Pompey - Cardiff from TM, a RPO came across two people with no tickets and no means to pay on leaving Temple Meads.
He had a word with the driver and they were dropped off at the convenient location of Pilning. :)

Unfortunately, such an act nowadays is highly likely to land you in very deep water, as it constitutes a colossal failure of Duty of Care.
 
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