What decade did you start work in? And how was it for you?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Cowley, 3 Nov 2019.

  1. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    I'll admit mostly from stories in the media, which one has to take with a huge grain of salt these days, and also from friends of people who have worked there, although things can get lost in translation.

    If your godson is happy there then that's great.
     
  2. PeterY

    PeterY Member

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    I started work in 1974. On the whole. I've enjoyed the jobs I've done but a handful of characters I've come across, I wouldn't want to ever see again.
    The majority of the time, 27 years was spent with a giant photographic company.
    Today, I class myself as semi-retired and only work about 20 hours a week. I also do voluntary work, several hours a week.
    I'm now over 60, so I armed with my senior rail card.
     
  3. Lucan

    Lucan Member

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    Funny then that Amazon are emphatically against trade unions

    I have never worked at Amazon. Likewise I never fought in WW2 but I believe it happened.
    From www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jul/08/amazon-jeff-bezos-unionize-working-conditions
     
  4. Dai Corner

    Dai Corner Established Member

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    As I said in the bit you didn't quote membership can still be useful even if the employer doesn't recognise the Union.

    I'll take the experience of someone who's worked in the industry for twenty years and has no agenda over that of someone who's gone in for a week or two in looking for a story. Different Fulfilment Centres (as they call them) may be run differently, of course.
     
  5. Fast Track

    Fast Track Member

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    First job was when a student summer holiday 1972 working as a labourer on a new motorway. The work was hard but the banter was something else. It was humour that got everyone through the day.

    After clocking on at 7.30 there was a daily ritual where the older guys discussed their sex lives the night before. The brilliant humour of our Irish ganger still makes me laugh. He enquired every morning whether “we got the lucky the night before” and irrespective of our answers had us in stitches with the graphic details of his own experiences or not. Priceless stuff.

    Forget modern management team building nonsense we would all have a pint together in a pub every lunchtime, darts and loud jukebox and collect our wages in a pay packet at the end of the week which seemed like a fortune. Happy days.
     
  6. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    None of the things you mentioned sound like the kind of things I'd enjoy. I don't drink, I hate loud music and I wouldn't feel comfortable talking about or listening to other's sex lives. Different things work for different people, modern team building (in my admittedly limited experience), allows you to develop skills and relationships in a safer and more neutral environment.

    The team building exercises I've taken part in mainly revolve around solving interesting problems and thinking outside the box. I find that it's much more productive than a night in a pub and you still get to have a laugh.

    That's just my opinion anyway :)
     
  7. Grumpy Git

    Grumpy Git Member

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    Re. the last two posts, I think it depends when you were born?

    Things I find completely unremarkable sometimes absolutely astound my kids.
     
  8. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    I was born in 2000, if that has any bearing on things.
     
  9. Grumpy Git

    Grumpy Git Member

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    In a word yes.

    I'd sooner stick needles in my own eyes than go on a corporate "team building" day.
     
  10. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    Fair enough! I should note that the team building exercises I've mentioned haven't been for big corporations. They've been with colleges and organisations that help get young people like me into employment. So maybe in a more serious workplace environment, they are a load of nonsense.

    Either way, what Fast Track mentions in their post sounds like my own personal hell, whereas the opposite is true for you. It's interesting how different generations can view things sometimes.
     
  11. Dai Corner

    Dai Corner Established Member

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    Me too! I found the few I didn't manage to avoid quite embarrassingly cringeworthy.

    The Office canteen, bar, smoking room and sports/social club were where working relationships were forged in my experience.

    I'm 59 and retired, by the way so a different generation to you Corodiafan
     
  12. Grumpy Git

    Grumpy Git Member

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    When I was an apprentice, the place "to be seen" after work if you wanted to "get on" was the local Conservative club, ....................... I never darkened its doors.
     
  13. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    I don't mind getting to know colleagues while on a break, but I'm not one who enjoys clubs or pub environments. It may just be that I'm a more introverted person who prefers to keep to himself when possible, and prefers to just have a small group of valuable friends.
     
  14. Grumpy Git

    Grumpy Git Member

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    One of the lads was getting married and we all went to the pub Friday lunchtime. We didn't go back at 1 p.m. but kept drinking and after about half an hour one of the managers sent the storeman in a minivan to fetch us back, but the foreman told him (the storeman) to go away and so the gaffer turned-up to turf us out ............... we all ended-up in the pub all afternoon (including the gaffer), but there was hell-up on Monday morning. :)

    This wasn't an isolated incident!
     
  15. GusB

    GusB Established Member

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    Ah, team-building: There is no "I" in "team"!

    (There's no "F" in "management" either)
     
  16. Killingworth

    Killingworth Established Member

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    It does!

    Having first 'retired' a few years before 2000, but having returned to work in the modern corporate era, twice, I've seen big changes. In the 60s at the start it was a male dominated arena where the blokes would go to the pub of an evening. I don't recall discussion of personal sex, but as one of the more abstemious I'd still drive after 3 pints.

    By the early 1970s we'd started to accept more female participation in after office events and one or two of them could be quite forward. By the 90s it was becoming far more equal and since the 00s and 10s the ladies have all but reversed the dominant roles.

    Corporate team building events with prizes for everyone seem to be expected today. Lots of razamataz to celebrate an obscure anniversary, a new train, an award for being best at something. I received the top award for being the employee to have contributed most positively to my centre. Within the year I was requesting retirement for fear of being sacked! A change of senior management had totally different views.

    Advice? Keep your head below the battlements and attach your career to a rising star. Try to learn by watching the mistakes of others, and avoid as many as you can of your own!
     
  17. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    Thanks so much for the advice! I'm already beginning to learn from my own mistakes, and I'm slowly beginning to discover what I'm good and bad at. Reading the posts on this thread is also proving to be useful and informative, so I'm sure I'll find my place in the world in due time.
     
  18. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member

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    With your good attitude I think you definitely will Coradiafan.
    What’s worked the best for me over the years is being - honest, friendly, on time and reliable, and putting right any mistakes I have made.
    I’ve never advertised, and all of my work comes via word of mouth from people that I’ve done work for previously.
    I always think: What would I expect if I was paying someone to do this?
    I then make sure that I do that and a little bit more on top.
    Always learning though...
     
  19. Xenophon PCDGS

    Xenophon PCDGS Veteran Member

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    When I left Manchester University in 1966 armed with a First in Mathematics, much to the dismay of my parents, I did not then pursue the career in teaching that they had assumed that I would follow, but instead joined a large international company that one of my professors had not only suggested that I join and had also prepared the way by introducing me to a member of the managerial staff of that company for a preliminary discussion on a career there.

    Having worked in five different industries since then, until retirement in 2010, I have never regretted taking his advice and working in different industries really gave me the knowledge base in industry with almost thirty years experiance in senior managerial roles that was of great help when I joined the consultancy in my final role as Senior Head of Projects.
     
  20. telstarbox

    telstarbox Established Member

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    This is great advice.

    I would add (to misquote JFK) - do what you can to make your team or the organisation succeed as well as yourself.
     
  21. furnessvale

    furnessvale Established Member

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    We used to call that "having a jockey" and people doing it were universally hated. True, some got on but many others faltered when their "rising star" fell like a meteor!
     
  22. Grumpy Git

    Grumpy Git Member

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    I would say try to get a job you enjoy and always do your best. Easier said than done, but if you can manage it, it will make you life a lot better. Hopefully your seniors will notice this and you will be rewarded for you endeavours.
     
  23. d9009alycidon

    d9009alycidon Member

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    Team Building - Now there is something to stir a horrible memory, my last employer was very keen on Team Building courses and shortly after joining them I was told that I would be going with a group to Brathey Hall in the Lake District. I wasn't keen but as I had just joined I felt that declining this would not have gone down well. Suffice to say I absolutely hated it, the weather was wet and windy and the outdoor pursuits either involved climbing trees, jumping off ridiculously small and high platforms to hit a leather ball and rowing out on Windemere in a boat that I felt was far too small for the conditions. As I can't swim I have a fear of water and also a fear of heights, so I refused to get in the boat or go up trees, that marked me out as a cissy and made me feel very uncomfortable, hardly in the spirit of becoming part of the team.
    A few years later and a new Quality Team was set up and the leader announced that we were all to go back to Brathey, this time for an advanced course involving climbing hills and kayaking over lakes, this time I refused point blank which made me very unpopular with the management. As a result I started looking for another job and found one shortly afterwards, thankfully my current employer doesn't bother with that sort of thing.
     
  24. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    I've already mentioned that for the most part I enjoy my job at Tesco, but my voluntary work at a local foodbank is what I enjoy the most and feel the most pride in doing. There's nothing more rewarding than it, and I'd love to get a more full time career there.
     
  25. Tom B

    Tom B Established Member

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    I had a number of part time / temporary jobs whilst a student, started full time work in 2011. "Team building" even then involved going to the pub... however, stories that older colleagues have make this pale into insignificance!

    The workplace has undoubtedly changed dramatically in recent years. The days of folk going into a secure, well paid job and staying for 40 years are mostly over, sadly. One of the things I dislike about the modern attitude is how it is almost expected that people should move on after 2/3 years in some sectors - losing experience and generating upheaval.
     
  26. Tom B

    Tom B Established Member

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    If you mess up something, admit it and learn from the mistake. Don't try to hide it - you'll look worse when it inevitably surfaces than if you'd been honest outright.

    Give and take. If you're willing to swap shifts with colleagues you'll always have someone willing to help you out when you need it. If you stay behind when the boss is desperate for extra help, you'll be remembered when you want overtime.

    Keep on the good side of security, maintenance and cleaners.
     
  27. scotrail158713

    scotrail158713 Member

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    This frustrates my Dad as a teacher. He’s been teaching 20 years at one school, and doesn’t like how he’s viewed as unambitious because he doesn’t want to go for a promotion - he’s perfectly happy as he is.
     
  28. DarloRich

    DarloRich Veteran Member

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    the connections and networks you need to succeed in a proper job wont be built, solely, by having a chat over a coffee break and neither will keeping yourself to yourself. Also, being very cynical, being good at your job isnt enough. You have to know how to play the game and sometimes go outside what you are comfortable with to succeed. It isnt like the olden days described above but it isnt a meritocracy. Don't think that doing a good job alone will help you succeed. It wont. Obviously it will help but performance alone wont deliver success.

    Identify where you have some weaknesses and try to find a way to work on them and improve them. BTW You aren't bad at those things. You just might never have had a chance to show your skills or you may not know to improve or had access to tools to help you. A decent employer will help you with that because they will see the benefit of you doing a better job. There are some really good tools out there on the net to help with this kind of thing. Try something like Belbin or the personality colours test ( there are LOADS like this out there)

    It is good that you are self reflecting. That is really helpful, I find, in identifying areas for improvement. If you drop the ball (and we all do) admit that and learn from it. Don't focus on the result but focus on what you have learned and what you will do differently next time. Don't look to blame others when you should be standing up and accepting responsibility. Be honest, open and truthful ( but learn when people cant be trusted) and manage expectations about delivering. Saying you cant meet a deadline early ( and why) is much better than saying at the last minute. I have found most people will support you in that if you can say why early.

    Also, to get very management speak, know what you are responsible for and what you are accountable for. The two are very different. Don't let someone push their accountability onto you. Don't try to push your accountability onto someone else.

    University or College education is superb. However, university wont prepare you for the real world so take a mindset that you know nothing and listen to people who do. However don't be sacred to ask questions ( i encourage it and there is no such thing as a stupid question) and when you are confident challenge them with: why? Why are you doing that?

    Finally, as said above, keep all the cleaners, maintenance men, security guards, receptionists and secretaries sweet. They are surprisingly well informed and often influential people. At the bottom line they can make your life an absolute misery if they want to ;)

    EDIT - that is a bit rambling but remember none of us knew any of this stuff before we started work and none of us know it all. Don't be scared to make your contribution. You have skills we don't. You have experiences we don't. That is the value we all have and we can all bring to work.

    My job now is to argue with senior people like you and tell you things you don't like to hear. ;)
     
  29. Grumpy Git

    Grumpy Git Member

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    I think there is a high probability your services will still be required following the result on 12th Dec.
     
  30. coradiafan2000

    coradiafan2000 Member

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    That's what I'm afraid of. If the need for foodbanks isn't a sign of a failure from the government I don't know what is, they shouldn't have to exist at all.
     

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