Which bus would you most like to see fleets of replica builds go into service?

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Class 33

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Living in fantasy land here I know(allthough it's not exactly impossible or far fetched). But which old buses would you most like to see replica buids being produced and brought into service across the UK?

I would go for a Bristol VR. If I had my way I'd like to see them built exactly as they were, same chassis, same engine, the step up entrance/exits, everything. However being a bit more realistic to today's standards I'd have it with an environmentally friendly engine, and step-free entrance and exits. As with a number of the VR's I would have the buses all having a middle exit door to help solve the "bottle neck" problem these step-free single door modern buses have nowadays. I would have the seating just as it was, along with the interior lighting - the not overly bright yellow type lighting, NOT the horrendously bright white lighting buses(and trains) have nowadays. A bus with a bit of character and fun to travel on, unlike all these bland, sterile, and charactorless "Gemini" buses that the vast majority of double decker buses are in Bristol nowadays.

Most of you probably know what a Bristol VR looks like. But here's a lovely photo of one anyway http://www.flickr.com/photos/britishbuses/3625073986

Which buses would you most like to see replica builds being built and reintroduced into service?
 
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Mvann

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I agree. The back seat on the top deck of a Bristol Bristol were lovely to sleep on. Midland fox had some on the x49 service. Very comfortable to relax on. For single deck buses, I'd go for the metro scania.
 

BestWestern

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Being ever so slightly dull here, but I'd quite like to see FirstGroup buying batches of Volvo B10BLE with the superbly stylish Wright Renown bodywork again. Probably quite feasible with a few technical tweaks to reduce the emissions a tad. Going slightly older, B10M's with Alexander PS bodies would be nice.
 

Schnellzug

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A late model Leyland (with Cummins engine) or Volvo Olympian, modified, if we really have to follow PC regulations, with a step-free entrance. The B7TL was I suppose the successor to it, but always seemed a bit underpowered. And the B9TL I'm afraid sounds like a tractor.
 

Class 33

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Without doubt, the Leyland National.
Thirded!

That's what I'd have as a single decker bus replica rebuilds. Great buses! As with my Bristol VR suggestion, the replica rebuilds would feature a dual set of doors. What we need more of nowadays is buses with seperate entry and exit doors.

And while I'm here, here's a nice photo of one back in the day, with a Bristol RE in the background. Gawd those were the days!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jncarter1962/2361854189/

Good choices from the rest of you too by the way. If only it could happen eh?
 
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W-on-Sea

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I really don't see the appeal of Leyland Nationals, having ridden on them many many times! They were functional - oh the engine made a nice noise (and OK they were more like "real buses" than a lot of single deckers that succeeded them).

PACERS ON THE ROAD. Would be an accurate description. And just as functional. Especially to the NBC specifications (at least the seating on the LT ones was a little more comfortable.)

I have a bit of a soft spot for Bristol VRs though.
 

flymo

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I have to agree with some of the comments above with the Bristol VR, Bristol RE an Mk1 National. All part of my growing up in Northern General Transport and United Automobile Services land as a kiddie.

I always had a soft spot for the Scania 111 with the unbelievably wobbly bodywork. Sort out the rotting bodies and bring 'em back. Strangely enough I had a dream last night about T&W Scania 774 (OCU 774R) working the 77 to Darras Hall. WIERD!!:shock::shock:
 

Deerfold

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What we need more of nowadays is buses with seperate entry and exit doors.
However most operators remove (or more confusingly, don't use) the middle doors from cascaded London stock - I believe this is partly due to passengers not being used to them (except those who are used to travelling in London) and the design of many modern bus station where those exiting by a middle door get mown down by the bus coming into the next bay.
 

90019

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However most operators remove (or more confusingly, don't use) the middle doors from cascaded London stock - I believe this is partly due to passengers not being used to them (except those who are used to travelling in London) and the design of many modern bus station where those exiting by a middle door get mown down by the bus coming into the next bay.
It also means you don't get fraudulent claims from people about drivers shutting the doors on their arms.
 

Class 33

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However most operators remove (or more confusingly, don't use) the middle doors from cascaded London stock - I believe this is partly due to passengers not being used to them (except those who are used to travelling in London) and the design of many modern bus station where those exiting by a middle door get mown down by the bus coming into the next bay.
That is bizzarre. Though I can understand not opening the middle doors at bus stations. But a lot of city bus services don't serve bus stations directly (as in driving into the terminus bay stops) anyway. So not really an issue.

It would speed up loading/unloading times if buses had dual doors and actually used them for the purpose they were intended. On cross city services especially when the bus pulls into a busy town centre stop, it can take as long as a few minutes for all the people to disembark before anyone can even board! Whereas if the bus had a seperate exit door that was used, it would be much quicker loading/unloading times.

Not as big an issue, but it's also annoying to board a bus thinking no one is getting off(as it appears to look). But as you're just on the bus you then see some people are only then about to disembark(either just leaving their seat or coming down the stairs), and then you have to step completely off the bus to let them off! Years ago on the old bus, even with the single door buses the doorway was divded by a rail. The left side of the rail for boarding, the right side for disembarking. Which was useful and speeded up loading/unloading times at stops. Of course with today's modern buses all being step free/low floor, this is not possible.

I have noticed some dual door double deckers in use in Bristol on Wessex Connect and South Gloucester Bus & Coach services. But I haevn't noticed if the exit doors are actually used. Haven't been on these particular buses yet. But I'll try and watch out for that. Some old 1980's double deckers are used on one of the South Gloucestershire Bus.. services, so I want to get a ride on that pretty soon.
 

starrymarkb

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That is bizzarre. Though I can understand not opening the middle doors at bus stations. But a lot of city bus services don't serve bus stations directly (as in driving into the terminus bay stops) anyway. So not really an issue.

It would speed up loading/unloading times if buses had dual doors and actually used them for the purpose they were intended. On cross city services especially when the bus pulls into a busy town centre stop, it can take as long as a few minutes for all the people to disembark before anyone can even board! Whereas if the bus had a seperate exit door that was used, it would be much quicker loading/unloading times.

Not as big an issue, but it's also annoying to board a bus thinking no one is getting off(as it appears to look). But as you're just on the bus you then see some people are only then about to disembark(either just leaving their seat or coming down the stairs), and then you have to step completely off the bus to let them off! Years ago on the old bus, even with the single door buses the doorway was divded by a rail. The left side of the rail for boarding, the right side for disembarking. Which was useful and speeded up loading/unloading times at stops. Of course with today's modern buses all being step free/low floor, this is not possible.

I have noticed some dual door double deckers in use in Bristol on Wessex Connect and South Gloucester Bus & Coach services. But I haevn't noticed if the exit doors are actually used. Haven't been on these particular buses yet. But I'll try and watch out for that. Some old 1980's double deckers are used on one of the South Gloucestershire Bus.. services, so I want to get a ride on that pretty soon.
Exeter had Dual door Minibuses, there was a campaign in the local paper after someone got caught in the rear doors to have them removed,
 

flymo

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I worked for Tyne and Wear PTE from 1982 an can remember those Scanias and Atlanteans very well. Actually the 20/21 (now they are the 22) was my local route as well so those two photos above just blow my mind.:eek:

The Scanias were brilliant buses to drive but they just fell apart as the back end was rotten. Shame really. Not many of the Atlanteans had the big black HELP bumper, made it a breeze to change wiper arms...:)
 
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I worked for Tyne and Wear PTE from 1982 an can remember those Scanias and Atlanteans very well. Actually the 20/21 (now they are the 22) was my local route as well so those two photos above just blow my mind.:eek:

The Scanias were brilliant buses to drive but they just fell apart as the back end was rotten. Shame really. Not many of the Atlanteans had the big black HELP bumper, made it a breeze to change wiper arms...:)
My dad joined in 1972 when it was still the Corporation. I don't remember the Scania's so well, but like you, my dad said they were good buses, but rotted easily. I spent a lot of my childhood travelling on the 21/22 so I remember the Atlantean's very well.
 

rail-britain

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However most operators remove (or more confusingly, don't use) the middle doors from cascaded London stock - I believe this is partly due to passengers not being used to them
This used to be due to the additional insurance and operational costs, plus reduced seating capacity
I remember at Bluebird Northern (when just taken over by Stagecoach) converted all of their Leyland Olympian Alexander two door double deckers to single door
Customers were used to dual doors in Aberdeen, so certainly not a reason to remove them

GRT (as it was then) had a similar issue when considering what to replace their double decker fleet in Aberdeen
There was surprise when it was found the insurance on the bendi bus format was about the same, and less than that for a single decker with dual door format
 

Schnellzug

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That is bizzarre. Though I can understand not opening the middle doors at bus stations. But a lot of city bus services don't serve bus stations directly (as in driving into the terminus bay stops) anyway. So not really an issue.

It would speed up loading/unloading times if buses had dual doors and actually used them for the purpose they were intended. On cross city services especially when the bus pulls into a busy town centre stop, it can take as long as a few minutes for all the people to disembark before anyone can even board! Whereas if the bus had a seperate exit door that was used, it would be much quicker loading/unloading times.

Not as big an issue, but it's also annoying to board a bus thinking no one is getting off(as it appears to look). But as you're just on the bus you then see some people are only then about to disembark(either just leaving their seat or coming down the stairs), and then you have to step completely off the bus to let them off! Years ago on the old bus, even with the single door buses the doorway was divded by a rail. The left side of the rail for boarding, the right side for disembarking. Which was useful and speeded up loading/unloading times at stops. Of course with today's modern buses all being step free/low floor, this is not possible..
And then there's the people (usually, it seems, fairly Large people) who stand right at the front because the seats near the front are taken, even though there may be plenty towards the back, so blocking the way for people who want to get off, and making people think that the bus is full.
 

flymo

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My dad joined in 1972 when it was still the Corporation. I don't remember the Scania's so well, but like you, my dad said they were good buses, but rotted easily. I spent a lot of my childhood travelling on the 21/22 so I remember the Atlantean's very well.
If I remember rightly the earliest reg Scania 111 Metropolitans T&W had were the 10 of the 600 series (672-681) JVK 672P - JVK 681P and they were from 1975/6. Pain in the proverbial they were with the heater motors under the nearside centre which lasted about a week in the snow.....

Atlanteans were brilliant, even the MCW ones (184 - 233 - VFT 184T to VFT 203T & YNL 204V to YNL 233V). Wonderful buses<D

I could go on, and sometimes do too much ---- sorry!!:D
 
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