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Why is the official closure date for a line or station the first weekday without a service?

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AY1975

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Does anyone know why it has always been customary in railway parlance when quoting the official date when a line or station closed, to quote the first Monday or first weekday when no trains ran on that line or called at that station rather than the last day of service?
 
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Surreytraveller

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Because on the last day of service the line hasn't closed - the full service has operated with (presumably) no alterations
 

AM9

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Because on the last day of service the line hasn't closed - the full service has operated with (presumably) no alterations
I think that is obvious as quoting the last day of operation would be confusing as many would think that it had already closed. As to why are things changed on the first day of the working wee, - well that allows shifts and duties to complete on the previous week with no odd short weeks to be accounted for. That also affects commuting passengers in the same way, especially with respect to season tickets.
 

DelW

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It's more consistent with the case of lines that didn't have a seven days a week service.

Take a line that only ran Monday to Friday, and the last trains ran on a Friday. Obviously the Friday isn't the closure day, as trains were running. But arguably, neither Saturday nor Sunday were the closure day either, as they were no different from previous normal weekends. So the following Monday was the first day that the normal situation didn't apply.

Somewhere I have a tube map with opening and closing dates, that explains the options, and why the compiler chose "first day of no service" as above. If I can find it, I'll post that explanation here.
 

pdeaves

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Somewhere I have a tube map with opening and closing dates, that explains the options, and why the compiler chose "first day of no service" as above. If I can find it, I'll post that explanation here.
Douglas Rose's diagram? He gives a pretty good exposition. My personal preference is to state 'last trains called on...', with a note if necessary to clarify calendar day or railway operating day if trains called after midnight. However, whatever convention is used, it can still get confusing and trip people up!
 

John Webb

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It's more consistent with the case of lines that didn't have a seven days a week service.

Take a line that only ran Monday to Friday, and the last trains ran on a Friday. Obviously the Friday isn't the closure day, as trains were running. But arguably, neither Saturday nor Sunday were the closure day either, as they were no different from previous normal weekends. So the following Monday was the first day that the normal situation didn't apply.

Somewhere I have a tube map with opening and closing dates, that explains the options, and why the compiler chose "first day of no service" as above. If I can find it, I'll post that explanation here.
The recently published second edition of the "Atlas of Railway Station Closures" (Crecy Publishing) makes a similar comment, pointing out that frequently branch lines did not have Sunday services, so that the last trains ran on the Saturday, and that therefore the following Monday was the first day without scheduled services, and has been taken as the date of closure. It also points out that many stations remained in use for goods traffic for some time after they closed to passengers and that a few stations had excursion traffic or enthusiast's trips after the loss of regular passenger traffic. So the Crecy book stays with the closing date as the first day without a scheduled passenger service.
 
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norbitonflyer

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Somewhere I have a tube map with opening and closing dates, that explains the options, and why the compiler chose "first day of no service" as above. If I can find it, I'll post that explanation here.

Douglas Rose's Tube map shows "last day of service". As he points out, "first day of no service" produces many anomalies, such as Essex Road closing (to LT traffic) the day after the line itself closed. Essex Road had no weekend service at the time, and the line closed at the end of traffic on a Saturday night, so the official closure of the line was "on and from" Sunday but the station "on and from" Monday. Rose's convention has the last trains at Essex Road on the Friday, and the line itself closing on the Saturday.
 

DelW

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Douglas Rose's Tube map shows "last day of service". As he points out, "first day of no service" produces many anomalies, such as Essex Road closing (to LT traffic) the day after the line itself closed. Essex Road had no weekend service at the time, and the line closed at the end of traffic on a Saturday night, so the official closure of the line was "on and from" Sunday but the station "on and from" Monday. Rose's convention has the last trains at Essex Road on the Friday, and the line itself closing on the Saturday.
Oops, you're quite right, that is the map I have, and his conclusion indeed is the opposite of what I quoted :oops:. I should have searched out my copy of the map first, not posted from memory!

He explains the merits of "first day of no service", but goes on to point out some anomalies that it produces, and concludes that "last day trains called" is preferable.
 

gbbub321

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Does anyone know why it has always been customary in railway parlance when quoting the official date when a line or station closed, to quote the first Monday or first weekday when no trains ran on that line or called at that station rather than the last day of service?
It’s all to do with week commencing, everything on the railway is week commencing
 
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