Worker Killed on the NYMR

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Max

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I accept this isn't technically NR General Discussion, but I feel this should be posted in a more prominent section of the forum. My sympathies go out to the family of the worker who has tragically been killed at Grosmont on the NYMR. It appears that he became trapped between two trains, although I do not know of the circumstances. :(

http://www.whitbygazette.co.uk/news...an-dies-on-north-york-moors-railway-1-4569666
 
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It appears he became trapped while attempting to couple two vehicles. Very sad indeed and goes to highlight dangers staff face even on heritage lines.
 

33056

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It appears he became trapped while attempting to couple two vehicles. Very sad indeed and goes to highlight dangers staff face even on heritage lines.
This is awful and barely six years after the similar incident at the Gwili Railway . In the last 25 years I have personally known at least five people who have lost their life or limbs in shunting accidents which just goes to illustrate what a dangerous activity it is.
 

dk1

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As a life long rail worker i always find incidents like this so upsetting. How dreadful for colleagues working with the person at the time. Much respect to all.
 

MattRobinson

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First, obviously, I must express my sympathy to the bloke's family and friends. Secondly, I'd like to point out that a preserved railway is arguably more dangerous than 'the big railway'- older stock and locos with less visibilty being one factor, but also because most of the volunteers do a completely different day job and can only get up there occasionally and so the work is carried out by less experienced people generally. Finally, does anyone have any more information about this than the news articles? Was it a service train?

I hope I'm not overstepping the mark when I speak for my colleagues at KWVR and say that we've been hit hard by the news and that it's made us all realise how dangerous our hobby is.

Cheers,
Matt
 

Ivo

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Terrible and very sad news :( It shows that even the love put into a preserved railway can't make them entirely safe.

Condolences and my thoughts to family and staff.
 

9K43

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It is always upsetting when anyone loses their life on the railway.
In 27.5 years I worked totally dealing with big engines, heavy rolling stock, steam engines and all other stock that you would find when on or about the railway.
If you take your mind off what you are doing for a second accidents can happen.
 

Jonfun

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Even as a volunteer on different heritage railways to the one in question I still feel there is an element of colleague-ness between heritage volunteers - we're all aiming to reach the same goal, and it's always terrible to hear of such an incident like this where one of 'us' was taken in a tragic accident, and my sympathy and thoughts goes out unconditionally to his friends, family and colleagues, especially to those there on the day.

I think there can sometimes be an element of 'well, people do it as a hobby, it can't be that dangerous' from people looking from the outside (and, I regret to say, occasionally people within) the heritage rail sector, but as has been pointed out, in many respects it can be as dangerous/more dangerous than mainline railways. I certainly do hope that at least if lessons can be learnt, and a minority of people's attitudes changed by this incident, then it would act as some comfort to friends and colleagues that it would go some way to helping prevent another similar tragedy.
 

John55

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Prompted by this story I did a quick check on the RAIB website and out of about 200 reports issued since 2006 16 or 8% relate to incidents on preserved railways.

Looks like they might have to work harder on procedures and training.
 

shedman

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As someone who is involved in shunting almost every day at work and have been involved in a couple of close calls I would like to pass on sincere condolences. The job of Shunter is something that is completely underappreciated by the railway and does not received the respect it deserves (this is not a dig at anyone whatsoever just an honest opinion not only shared by me). It will never become a job without risk no matter how many new procedures are brought in to try and prevent it. All we can do is remember what can happen if we don't do things right and treat this as a loud wake up call.

I am very sorry for his loss and may he rest in peace.
 

142094

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The job of Shunter is something that is completely underappreciated by the railway and does not received the respect it deserves
Completely agree with this - although shunters make up a small proportion of the total workforce on the railways, there is a higher casualty rate amongst shunters than any other job type.
 

PFX

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It will never become a job without risk
According to the RAIB report into the Gwili accident in 2006, shunters are 6 times more likely to be involved in a fatal accident compared to track workers and operational staff. Sobering thought.
 
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