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Old 27th July 2015, 20:53   #1
turntablist
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Default Train slowed to 20mph due to broken horn handle

Strange situation on 3:30(ish) train from Halifax to Bradford Interchange today, somewhere near Low Moor the train stopped after the horn sounded, then the guard proceded to walk down the train saying we would be arriving late at Bradford because the horn handle had broken off in the drivers hand and we would be travelling at 20mph until we reached Bradford, where the driver would be changing ends to continue on to Leeds, i think it was a 155, has this happened before?
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Old 27th July 2015, 20:55   #2
E&W Lucas
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No working horn, train to proceed at 20mph max. Standard procedure.
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:05   #3
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"Today three trackworkers were killed and another two injured when they were hit by an express train travelling from Halifax. Early reports indicate that the men had only seconds to get out of the way of the train which was travelling at approximately 60mph with a non-functional horn."

This is a story I *never* want to read.
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:09   #4
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Thanks for the fast replys, i had thought that it was procedure and that is also a story i never want to read, i just wondered if there was any history of the horn handle breaking off in sprinters
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:11   #5
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This is why when slowing or cancelling a train I only ever tell passengers it's a train fault which can't be fixed. Give too much info and people think you are being a jobsworth etc...broken headlight on a sunny day, broken windscreen wiper, broken cab air con, broken horn etc...tell the passengers the truth and you end up drowning in sarcastic and snide comments. So as far as I'm concerned it's due to a train fault and leave it at that. If someone asks what the fault is I simply tell them it's a faulty safety system - which is pretty much sort of the truth anyway.
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Originally Posted by turntablist View Post
Thanks for the fast replys, i had thought that it was procedure and that is also a story i never want to read, i just wondered if there was any history of the horn handle breaking off in sprinters

In most BR built units the horn is a stick in the middle of the desk. It can snap/jam etc like anything else. Wouldn't say it's a common fault in any way but it's not unheard of.

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Old 27th July 2015, 21:16   #6
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I remember following a train travelling at 20mph as the horn had frozen in the snowy weather, and couldn't be sounded.

No working horn is 20mph.

Not heard of a broken horn handle before, but am not surprised.
Horns have isolating cocks to isolate the air supply in case the horn valve gets stuck open and is using up all the compressed air, by the way, although that wasn't the case here. Meridians had an isolating cock for each tone (high/low) so if one valve got stuck, the train could still carry on at linespeed with one working tone.
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:18   #7
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Thanks for the info A-driver, i didnt hear any snide comments although there was a couple of middle aged lady's on the table opposite panicking about wether the train would get to Leeds
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:23   #8
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Broken headlight in the daytime (also 20mph) would likely get snide comments!
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:29   #9
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Quote:
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Broken headlight in the daytime (also 20mph) would likely get snide comments!

Indeed, although even in the bright sunshine a headlight makes a train visible far, far earlier.
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:31   #10
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So, what's the betting that the fitters response once it's back on depot will be 'No Fault Found'?
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Old 27th July 2015, 21:40   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoosh View Post
Broken headlight in the daytime (also 20mph) would likely get snide comments!

A headlight isn't completely so a driver can see, more so that the train can be seen, and what direction it's going in.
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Old 27th July 2015, 22:27   #12
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Quote:
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I remember following a train travelling at 20mph as the horn had frozen in the snowy weather, and couldn't be sounded.
Indeed, it's not an uncommon problem as you may well be aware. At least one well known West Midlands depot keeps a high-tech piece of equipment commonly known as "a kettle" on hand during harsh winters to treat units so afflicted before they go off depot on a morning (probably not unheard of elsewhere).
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Old 27th July 2015, 23:13   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A-driver View Post
Indeed, although even in the bright sunshine a headlight makes a train visible far, far earlier.
And a car, as the introduction of daytime running lights would confirm.
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Old 27th July 2015, 23:50   #14
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A few times during the winter months i have had a phone call from our control saying that the horn on a certain train is not working and could we help the driver sort out the problem.
This will then involve asking the signaller to bring the train into the loop platform and advising him that we will be going onto the track so put a block on the platform.
It then usually involves running back and forth to the office and getting boiling water to pour over the horns to melt the ice.
You do look a wally standing in front of the train with your fingers in your ears as the driver tests the horn!!.
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Old 28th July 2015, 00:51   #15
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Not sure who came up with it, but I believe we've taken to putting a "muffler" of sorts over the horns on our units to reduce the chance of snow and ice accumulation during the winter. This being after a particularly harsh winter where the fitters were almost spending more time deicing horns than rectifying mechanical faults.
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