Choice of Monopoly Board Stations

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Mutant Lemming

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I am about to head to Fenchurch Street and it has me wondering why the choice of Fenchurch Street, Liverpool Street, Kings Cross and Marylebone for the London version of the Monopoly board ? Logically one would have expected something like Euston, Liverpool Street, Victoria, Paddington on a kind of compass points basis. Does anyone know the actual reason for the choice of stations - is their a reason or was it just a whim ?
 
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tbtc

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There's a book about why the Waddingtons people (on a trip down from Leeds) chose the various streets they did in the 1930s when buying rights to the US game (the American version is based on Atlantic City).

IIRC the decision about stations had something to do with LNER stations (since they arrived at Kings Cross when coming down from Yorkshire, but I'm not sure that I've remembered that right).

A lot of the streets on the map were more significant in the 1930s too - I suspect that a modern version would have ones like Tottenham Court Road.
 

Greenback

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I am about to head to Fenchurch Street and it has me wondering why the choice of Fenchurch Street, Liverpool Street, Kings Cross and Marylebone for the London version of the Monopoly board ? Logically one would have expected something like Euston, Liverpool Street, Victoria, Paddington on a kind of compass points basis. Does anyone know the actual reason for the choice of stations - is their a reason or was it just a whim ?
I don't know how true it is, but the story goes that the boss of Parkers, who bought the UK rights to the game, travelled down from Yorkshire to visit London and choose the streets that would be used. He travelled by LNER, and on arrival, saw posters referring to the other LNER stations in the capital - Fenchurch Street, Marylebone and Liverpool Street! Legend has it that he returned up north never having encountered any other London station!

I read this in a book about the history of London's Monopoly streets that I got from the library, but I can't remember the name of the book. It seems as plausible as anything else though.

tvtc has just beat me to it - though of course I should have put Waddingtons, Parker Bros had the US rights!
 

AndrewP

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It was pretty random.

The boss of Waddingtons and his secretary (from Leeds) chose them based on places they knew in London.

This also explains the use of Mayfair (a district), Angel Islington which is a station / pub rather than say Upper Street or City Road and Vine St which is little more than an alley.

Also where can you find free parking in London all the time?
 

Electrostar

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The book is called Do Not Pass Go by Tim Moore. It's a thoroughly enjoyable read. The author visits the present day (early 2000s) sites, relays their history and describes what they were like when Victor Watson and his secretary Marjorie Phillips visited London and why they chose them. You are quite right, Watson appears to have simply chosen other LNER stations having arrived at King's Cross despite having travelled far and wide to other sites (like the Crossness water works) on the board.
 

tbtc

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There's a book about why the Waddingtons people (on a trip down from Leeds) chose the various streets they did in the 1930s when buying rights to the US game (the American version is based on Atlantic City)
The book is called Do Not Pass Go by Tim Moore. It's a thoroughly enjoyable read
Yup - that's the one I was thinking of - I agree that it is a good read - whilst the Monopoly selection was fairly "unscientific" it shows the way that London has changed over the years and how some places have changed in importance (and value!) over the years.
 

Eagle

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The game's designer was a fan of the LNER, AFAIK all four stations were LNER stations.
Surprisingly, Fenchurch Street was actually a LMS station. The LTSR was bought out by the Midland Railway in the early 20th century (seemingly being as it connected with several North London lines, which they also owned, giving them sea access at Tilbury and Canvey Island).

It was only at nationalization that it was transferred to the "correct" region.

The LNER did only have the three London terminals though (unless you count Moorgate on the Widened Lines), so being as it was a Yorkshireman who designed it it's not inconceivable that that was the reason for choosing the other three.

Angel Islington which is a station / pub...
To be fair, it's also the name of the major road junction just outside the pub (ditto Elephant and Castle).
 
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LE Greys

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Surprisingly, Fenchurch Street was actually a LMS station. The LTSR was bought out by the Midland Railway in the early 20th century (seemingly being as it connected with several North London lines, which they also owned, giving them sea access at Tilbury and Canvey Island).

It was only at nationalization that it was transferred to the "correct" region.

The LNER did only have the three London terminals though (unless you count Moorgate on the Widened Lines), so being as it was a Yorkshireman who designed it it's not inconceivable that that was the reason for choosing the other three.
A bit of healthy competition on the north bank of the Thames.

I've seen plenty of other versions of Monopoly where they've had to add bus stations to make up the numbers.
 

martinsh

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Surprisingly, Fenchurch Street was actually a LMS station. The LTSR was bought out by the Midland Railway in the early 20th century (seemingly being as it connected with several North London lines, which they also owned, giving them sea access at Tilbury and Canvey Island).

It was only at nationalization that it was transferred to the "correct" region.
Er, no. Fenchurch Street was actually built by the London & Blackwall Railway which ended up as part of the LNER. The LTSR / Midland / LMS were merely tenants with running powers (from Stepney East IIRC).

Not sure that LNER actually used the station after the 1930s though.
 
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