DeLorean DMC-80

GusB

Established Member
Associate Staff
Buses & Coaches
Joined
9 Jul 2016
Messages
3,544
Location
Elginshire
A couple of years ago my dad handed me a book entitled "Buses of the World" by Derek Moses. It's an Ian Allan title, published in 1982 and it lists various vehicles by country. On page 133 of said book there is a listing for the DeLorean DMC-80 which appears in the "USA" section of the book. It's a fairly modern looking city bus for its time and appears to utilise a lot of the features that we see on low-floor buses today (smaller wheels and tyres, for example). The photograph is clearly of a real bus in a real setting, although the photo has been altered to show "DMC-80" on the destination screen.

According to the article:
The DeLorean DMC-80, introduced in 1979, is manufactured and marketed by the New York based DeLorean Motor Co. The main feature of this vehicle is the low floor level of 560mm made possible by the design and medium profile tyres. An articulated version is also produced.

The only vehicle produced by DeLorean that I'm aware of was the DMC-12 car, made famous by the Back to the Future film franchise and perhaps more infamous by the circumstances surrounding the company's bankruptcy.

Anyhow, the photo of the bus itself appears to have been taken in a European setting, and there is badging on the front that says "FFG Falkenried". I googled this name and I was pointed in the direction of FFG Hamburg. Fortunately they have a history section on their website, and a handy slideshow where I was able to find two images of the same bus.


11:49 is where you'll find the first picture. The setting looks remarkably similar to the photograph in the book, including the tram lines and the squares painted on the road surface. I've included a screenshot below (photographer unknown) but credit to FFG Hamburg.

VOV-BUSII.jpg

Does anyone know if this project actually got off the ground in the United States, or was it one of John DeLorean's fantasies?
 
Last edited:
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

jammy36

Member
Joined
28 Aug 2013
Messages
208
Thanks but it doesn't answer my question, though.
It has allowed me to find this reference on a website (http://www.gruzovikpress.ru/article...rtizatsiya-po-nemetski-vtoroe-pokolenie-ch-1/) that may answer your question (quote translated from Russian):

Fiasco in America
After eliminating the shortcomings, another prototype Typ FFG Prototyp VÖV-Bus II was manufactured, which, according to the decision of the BMFT Ministry, from September 28, 1976 to December 8, 1980, was tested in 40 cities of Germany. Essen was the last. The tests caused a great stir not only within the country, but also abroad. The head of the American company DeLorean Motor Corporation (DMC) praised the potential of the new bus.

In 1973, the federal Transbus program was launched in the United States to accelerate the development of modern affordable buses and John Zachary DeLorean (1972-1973 Vice President of General Motors) approached Otto Schultz with a proposal for commercial cooperation. The proposal found support, and in 1980 Otto Schultz sold DeLorean a license to manufacture buses. In the same year, DMC received certification for the DMC-80 bus and printed advertisements that promised an urban fuel consumption of 6 miles per gallon of diesel fuel (6 mpg = 39 liters per 100 kilometers).

They became interested in the bus in New York and offered to place an order. However, already in 1981, the forthcoming Transbus program was postponed by the FTA (Federal Transit Administration).

DeLorean could not continue to work without the support of the state, and banks and shareholders did not see the success of the enterprise without state orders.

As a result, the supply of buses to New York had to be abandoned. After the completion of the tests, the Typ FFG Prototyp VÖV-Bus II buses were returned to Hamburg, where they worked for another two years and were decommissioned in 1982.
 

Gag Halfrunt

Member
Joined
23 Jul 2019
Messages
298
FFG didn't pull out. They did their job, which was to design the buses. It was up to CIÉ to find a manufacturing partner, since the buses would of course be built in Ireland. Anyway, the second generation VÖV bus was surely the basis for the CIÉ buses, because FFG had designed it in the first place.

 

GusB

Established Member
Associate Staff
Buses & Coaches
Joined
9 Jul 2016
Messages
3,544
Location
Elginshire
It has allowed me to find this reference on a website (http://www.gruzovikpress.ru/article...rtizatsiya-po-nemetski-vtoroe-pokolenie-ch-1/) that may answer your question (quote translated from Russian):
That's an interesting find, and more or less explains the situation. The book gave the impression that they were in production in the US, but it obviously didn't get that far.

DeLorean could not continue to work without the support of the state, and banks and shareholders did not see the success of the enterprise without state orders.
That sounds all too familiar!
 

Strathclyder

Established Member
Joined
12 Jun 2013
Messages
1,879
Location
Clydebank, West Dunbartonshire
FFG didn't pull out. They did their job, which was to design the buses. It was up to CIÉ to find a manufacturing partner, since the buses would of course be built in Ireland. Anyway, the second generation VÖV bus was surely the basis for the CIÉ buses, because FFG had designed it in the first place.

Seems I had things a bit backwards then or I just plain forgot (particularly embarrassing as that's my thread you linked there lol); cheers for setting me straight. :)
 

Top