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Do trains have Launch Control

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ChristopherJ

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Similar to road cars, do trains have a function that allows the driver to achieve a perfect 'takeoff' by using the computer to apply the exact amount of torque when the brake is released?

In cars it works by holding your foot on both power and brake pedals, I imagine a train equivalent would be power applied to the wheels as soon as the door interlock is complete? E.g the train accelerates the instant the doors are locked.

An explanation by Jeremy Corbyn is here:
 
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py_megapixel

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An explanation by Jeremy Corbyn
Ummm.... wrong Jeremy....

To answer your actual question, I think the closest thing to this is the railway world is something called ATO (automated train operation). From what I have heard (as I'm not a driver), the way it works is that the driver closes the doors, and then a button on their control panel lights up, which they press, which causes the train to accelerate perfectly to the optimal speed and essentially drive itself to the next station, stopping in the correct position and in some cases releasing the doors automatically.

However, this is only in use on Thameslink and some deep level tube lines.
 

Domh245

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Nothing quite like launch control that I'm aware of - nearest (and most useful) equivalent thing is the hill-start button which holds the brakes whilst power begins to be applied to stop trains rolling backwards when starting - this can either be through a dedicated button on units with just a single traction/brake controller, or 'manually' by just not fully releasing the brakes on their own lever.
 

Trackman

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Nothing quite like launch control that I'm aware of - nearest (and most useful) equivalent thing is the hill-start button which holds the brakes whilst power begins to be applied to stop trains rolling backwards when starting - this can either be through a dedicated button on units with just a single traction/brake controller, or 'manually' by just not fully releasing the brakes on their own lever.
I suppose WSP (Wheel slip protection) could fall under the same thing too.
 

ComUtoR

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I've couple of few units that would have something similar to "launch control" Electrostars and Desiro City's both have softaware that will limit the traction and effectively decide for itself how much power or brake is delivered.
 

43096

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I suppose WSP (Wheel slip protection) could fall under the same thing too.
Wheel slip protection is the equivalent of traction control on a car; wheel slide protection is equivalent to ABS.
 

Richard Scott

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I've only heard of two occasions both with light locos, these are first hand accounts but may have artistic licence. First was a 56 wound up against straight air brake and when signal went green it hit 60 in 19 seconds. Second was an 87 again wound up and when let go pushed driver hard back in seat.
 

Cowley

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I've only heard of two occasions both with light locos, these are first hand accounts but may have artistic licence. First was a 56 wound up against straight air brake and when signal went green it hit 60 in 19 seconds. Second was an 87 again wound up and when let go pushed driver hard back in seat.
I’ve heard similar from a friend that used to drive 73s. On electric, light engine only they’d take off like a scalded cat apparently.
 

Richard Scott

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I’ve heard similar from a friend that used to drive 73s. On electric, light engine only they’d take off like a scalded cat apparently.
Some good OBB Taurus acceleration runs on Youtube, one here
0-60mph in around 13 seconds and 0-100mph in about 26, not bad!!
 

Cowley

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Some good OBB Taurus acceleration runs on Youtube, one here
0-60mph in around 13 seconds and 0-100mph in about 26, not bad!!
Blimey. I’m sure I picked out the word “Jesus!” in there about a third of the way through..?
 

edwin_m

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There was a derailment at Bletchley where a light electric was put on full power away from an approach-controlled signal and had an overspeed on the crossover it was protecting.
Report 24/2012: Derailment at Bletchley Junction - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

At 02:27 hrs on 3 February 2012, an electric locomotive that was being driven from Crewe to Wembley, on the West Coast Main Line, derailed as it negotiated the diverging route at Bletchley Junction. The locomotive was travelling at a speed of 65.5 mph (105.4 km/h) when it derailed: the speed limit for the diverging route was 15 mph (24 km/h).
...The driver of the locomotive correctly reduced its speed on the approach to the red signal before the junction but when this changed to green, with an ‘F’ indication meaning that the locomotive was to take the diverging route, the driver applied full power in the belief that he was going straight on.
 

XAM2175

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I'd say that the German AFB (Automatische Fahr- und Bremssteuerung, Automatic Traction and Brake Control) system comes pretty close to this. The driver sets the target speed and the maximum amount of tractive effort that can be used by the system to attain said target speed, after which the system blends the release of the holding brake with the application of power and sets off. It will then gradually reduce power as it reaches the target speed, and maintain it by using power and dynamic braking as appropriate.

Granted it is intended more as a cruise-control function than launch control or proper ATO.

I seem to remember there's a similar cruise-control device on some classes of British electric locos (90s and 91s?), but I'm not sure it's capable of managing a standing start.
 

DustyBin

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Similar to road cars, do trains have a function that allows the driver to achieve a perfect 'takeoff' by using the computer to apply the exact amount of torque when the brake is released?

In cars it works by holding your foot on both power and brake pedals, I imagine a train equivalent would be power applied to the wheels as soon as the door interlock is complete? E.g the train accelerates the instant the doors are locked.

An explanation by Jeremy Corbyn is here:

Pedantry alert, but that only applies to automatics. Apologies if I’m stating the obvious!
 
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