First high speed line for Denmark

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WatcherZero

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Plans for €1.3 billion Danish high-speed rail announced
Written by Helen Wright - 08 Mar 2012

Denmark's national rail authority Banedanmark plans to build the country's first high-speed railway between the capital, Copenhagen, and the municipality of Ringsted in the south, via Køge.

Budgeted to cost €1.3 billion, the 56km new line will handle passenger trains running up to 250km/h once construction is complete in 2018.

The existing line that runs from Copenhagen to Ringsted via Roskilde is one of Denmark's busiest routes. It is used by commuters between Copenhagen and the rest of the island of Zealand, as well as for nationwide and international passenger and freight traffic.

The new Copenhagen to Ringsted high-speed line will connect to the existing railway network in Vigerslev, via Ny Ellebjerg station, and other connections in Køge and Ringsted. A new station and interchange will be established in Køge Nord, and the existing Ny Ellebjerg station will be expanded with new platforms.

The project will also form part of the Trans-European Network that will link Scandinavia and the rest of Europe, and as such it is in line to receive TEN-T funding from the European Commission.

Construction will include four tunnels and 88 bridges as well as moving 3.3 million m3 of earth. It will also include the expropriation of 2.9 million m2 of land, including around 22 buildings, and the relocation of over 600 utilities such as electricity pylons and gas pipelines.

Banedanmark's Copenhagen-Ringsted project director, Jan Schneider-Tilli, said, "Construction projects of this magnitude are very rare in Denmark. We have benchmarked the budget against comparable European projects, and divided up the tenders into bundles ranging in value from €30 million to €200 million.

"This way we are moving away from the tender strategy of awarding two or three big contracts - like you see on some high-speed rail projects in France, for instance - which could price out local contractors."

The first contracts are expected to be awarded this summer, with further tenders completed "as soon as is reasonably possible" thereafter, according to Mr Schneider-Tilli.
http://www.khl.com/magazines/construction-europe/detail/item71830/
 
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Prometheus

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Why only 250 km/h (155 mph) when HS2 has been designed for 400 km/h (250 mph)?

Will HS2 also get funding from the EU's TEN-T programme? If not, why not?
 

starrymarkb

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Why only 250 km/h (155 mph) when HS2 has been designed for 400 km/h (250 mph)?

Will HS2 also get funding from the EU's TEN-T programme? If not, why not?
It's only 30 miles long, not much point in faster.

HSL in Switzerland is either 125mph or 140mph
 

Prometheus

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It's only 30 miles long, not much point in faster.

35 miles, but OK, see what you mean. Although if it is just the first stage of a high speed link to the rest of mainland Europe via Germany, wouldn't you expect higher speeds?

Perhaps this is just a ruse to get EU funding for a new line bypassing congested existing routes. The sort of ruse that mainland European governments are much better at than our own. :roll:



HSL in Switzerland is either 125mph or 140mph

I can understand that, to keep costs within reasonable limits, you have to follow the topography. The alternative of building very long tunnels to keep things straighter would be very costly because Swiss rocks are very, very hard - and slow (=expensive) to dig through. I know this because my friend is a geologist. ;)
 

LE Greys

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35 miles, but OK, see what you mean. Although if it is just the first stage of a high speed link to the rest of mainland Europe via Germany, wouldn't you expect higher speeds?

Perhaps this is just a ruse to get EU funding for a new line bypassing congested existing routes. The sort of ruse that mainland European governments are much better at than our own. :roll:
For perspective, that's London to Reading, which we can do in 22 minutes flat out and 25 minutes normal service on Victorian infrastructure with a slow-accelerating diesel. The increased top speed is only worth 5.5 seconds per mile, or about a minute at that distance. Power squares with speed, and cost is not far behind. Perhaps they conluded that saving a couple of minutes simply wasn't worth it.
 

Prometheus

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For perspective, that's London to Reading, which we can do in 22 minutes flat out and 25 minutes normal service on Victorian infrastructure with a slow-accelerating diesel. The increased top speed is only worth 5.5 seconds per mile, or about a minute at that distance. Power squares with speed, and cost is not far behind. Perhaps they conluded that saving a couple of minutes simply wasn't worth it.

True, but as I wrote above, but you obviously didn't see (despite quoting it;)):

Although if it is just the first stage of a high speed link to the rest of mainland Europe via Germany, wouldn't you expect higher speeds?
 

LE Greys

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True, but as I wrote above, but you obviously didn't see (despite quoting it;)):

Although if it is just the first stage of a high speed link to the rest of mainland Europe via Germany, wouldn't you expect higher speeds?
Well, yes and no (and I was ignoring that bit). I'm assuming that they would run at the local maximum. According to this map, the two lines to Hamburg both run at less than 250 km/h. Even if one or other is upgraded, then there may not be much need for anything more. Flensburg is the obvious crossing point. I don't know much about the area, but I'd assume that there isn't much point in spending more money on higher speeds unless you have at least 50 miles between stations.
 

WatcherZero

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The TEN-T funds are available to projects that link 3 or more countries so funding might be available with Irish connections (or at a push a Scotland connection), East and West coast mainlines as well as several others are already part of the TEN network.
 
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