General Knowledge Quiz

Calthrop

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Hint, appropriate for the likes of us -- even at the point in time, of maximum rail mileage: these countries had very little in the way of railways linking them together.
 
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krus_aragon

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There's a part of the world which was -- not quite 200 years ago -- briefly, most of it one country; which then split up into a number of small countries. A couple more independent small countries, previously "under different management", were added to the bunch very considerably later: one of these two, 78 years after the other. That last one added, differs significantly from all the others; in that it was a British colony until it achieved independence.

Whereabouts in the world, did all this happen?
I'll take a punt at the Spanish territories of Central & South America.

Whereas the Portuguese territories largely stayed together (as Brazil), the Spanish territories split apart into umpteen different countries.
 

Calthrop

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I'll take a punt at the Spanish territories of Central & South America.

Whereas the Portuguese territories largely stayed together (as Brazil), the Spanish territories split apart into umpteen different countries.
Close enough -- specifically, Central America. Guatemala / Honduras / Salvador / Nicaragua / Costa Rica were the Federal Republic of Central America for a couple of decades after gaining independence from Spain, then split apart into separate countries. The two "late to the party" were Panama (part of Colombia until 1903); and the British colony, Belize (formerly British Honduras) -- became independent 1981.

La plaza de toros es a Usted, Senor !
 

krus_aragon

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Close enough -- specifically, Central America. Guatemala / Honduras / Salvador / Nicaragua / Costa Rica were the Federal Republic of Central America for a couple of decades after gaining independence from Spain, then split apart into separate countries. The two "late to the party" were Panama (part of Colombia until 1903); and the British colony, Belize (formerly British Honduras) -- became independent 1981.

La plaza de toros es a Usted, Senor !
Well, I can thank a BBC radio show called The Invention of Brazil for the inspiration there.

Next question:

There is a work of fiction that has been released as two series of a radio show, an LP recording, and two books. It was then followed by a TV show and a three further books. Two decades later, those three books were adapted back for radio, and a film version of the original book was released. (There have also been a number of stage adaptations and computer games along the way.)

Please give the name of this work.
 

Trackman

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Well, I can thank a BBC radio show called The Invention of Brazil for the inspiration there.

Next question:

There is a work of fiction that has been released as two series of a radio show, an LP recording, and two books. It was then followed by a TV show and a three further books. Two decades later, those three books were adapted back for radio, and a film version of the original book was released. (There have also been a number of stage adaptations and computer games along the way.)

Please give the name of this work.
Hitchhiker's guide to the Galaxy?
 

Trackman

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Which cult comedy programme started off a stage show in 1994, after winning an award it was transferred a to Radio 4 show in 1997 were it won a Sony award and in 1999 it was made for television for 3 series and specials and a film were made?
 

fowler9

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Indeed it is! It's your floor now..
I remember the first episode of the programme with a mixture of joy and horror. Ha ha. Was it Glossop or Hadfield they used I can never remember. Went to a lovely wedding in Glossop about 10 years ago.

What surname links a popular character in a long running police drama set in a London suburb and a soldier from the Green Howards regiment who fought in Dunkirk, North Africa, Sicily and the Normandy landings on Gold Beach. He got a medal for the last one and could possibly have got two but the date was not in his favour. Bonus point for explaining how the date wasn't in his favour.
 

341o2

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Dixon as in Dixon of Dock Green, as both a TV and radio series, Jack Warner with his "Evening All"
George W Dixon of the Green Howards
 

fowler9

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Dixon as in Dixon of Dock Green, as both a TV and radio series, Jack Warner with his "Evening All"
George W Dixon of the Green Howards
Mate that is a brilliant answer but not the right one. I went to VAR with it but any medals he got don't coincide with the ones in question from what I can find. If you have any info about George Dixon not getting a second medal in Normandy because of the date the floor is your. He was obviously a very brave man. As an aside my Grandfather was also in the Green Howards through all those campaigns .
 
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deltic1989

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Hollis? WOII (CSM) Stanley Elton Hollis VC of the Green Howards, PC (171) Reg Hollis of the Metropolitan Police (The Bill).
Stan Hollis received the only VC to be awarded for an action on D-Day. He was also noted as the man the Nazis couldn't kill, after surviving several previous wounds. I have absolutely no idea why the date wasn't in his favour though. I can only assume it has to do with cut off dates for one or other of the campaign gongs.
 

fowler9

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Hollis? WOII (CSM) Stanley Elton Hollis VC of the Green Howards, PC (171) Reg Hollis of the Metropolitan Police (The Bill).
Stan Hollis received the only VC to be awarded for an action on D-Day. He was also noted as the man the Nazis couldn't kill, after surviving several previous wounds. I have absolutely no idea why the date wasn't in his favour though. I can only assume it has to do with cut off dates for one or other of the campaign gongs.
Sorry about the late reply. That is the answer I was after. As I understand it he could have received the VC for two different actions he was involved in on D Day. You can't get the VC twice in the same day. The battlefield is yours. Very proud and grateful for the actions of all these brave people and at the same time horrified at what the men and women on all sides went through.
 
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deltic1989

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By all accounts I've read Stan Hollis was either had the biggest plums in the world, or was a total madman. Either way theres no denying that he was a hero. Though in common with most of his peers he never saw himself as such.

Staying with VCs.

Who was the youngest recipient of a posthumous VC?
 

341o2

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Can you confirm this relates to a human as in 1943, the PDSA introduced the Dickin medal, often known as "the animal VC"
Andrew Fitzgibbon aged 15
 

fowler9

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By all accounts I've read Stan Hollis was either had the biggest plums in the world, or was a total madman. Either way theres no denying that he was a hero. Though in common with most of his peers he never saw himself as such.

Staying with VCs.

Who was the youngest recipient of a posthumous VC?
Probably a mixture of both. Ha ha. My grandfather who served with him kept going back for more after being injured multiple times. As for the youngest VC recipient I am going to guess at Noel Chavasse as he was a scouser and he did actually get two posthumously.
 

deltic1989

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Can you confirm this relates to a human as in 1943, the PDSA introduced the Dickin medal, often known as "the animal VC"
Andrew Fitzgibbon aged 15
I can confirm that this person is human. Whilst you are correct in stating that Andrew Fitzgibbon VC is acknowledged to be the youngest person to be awarded a VC (aged 15 years 3 months at the time of the action). He was, as far as I can gather, alive when it was awarded.

Probably a mixture of both. Ha ha. My grandfather who served with him kept going back for more after being injured multiple times. As for the youngest VC recipient I am going to guess at Noel Chavasse as he was a scouser and he did actually get two posthumously.
Captain Chavasse VC was 31 at the time of his first award of the VC and 32 at his death, after which he was awarded a bar for his VC posthumously.

With that said sadly nither of these answers are what I am looking for.
 

fowler9

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I can confirm that this person is human. Whilst you are correct in stating that Andrew Fitzgibbon VC is acknowledged to be the youngest person to be awarded a VC (aged 15 years 3 months at the time of the action). He was, as far as I can gather, alive when it was awarded.



Captain Chavasse VC was 31 at the time of his first award of the VC and 32 at his death, after which he was awarded a bar for his VC posthumously.

With that said sadly nither of these answers are what I am looking for.
Thanks for the correction and apologies for my error.
 

Calthrop

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I think maybe it's time for a clue. The person that I have in mind died in a town noted for it's seafood, and terrible football team.
Jack Cornwell, of the Royal Navy: mortally wounded at the Battle of Jutland -- died in hospital at Grimsby, June 2nd 1916, aged 16.
 

DerekC

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I checked out Jack Cornwell and he certainly seems to fit the criteria so I will take the plunge:

What astronomical object links the island of St Helena with Florence Cathedral?

(Note: question updated so that there is a single definite answer, consistent with the guidance)
 
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Calthrop

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I checked out Jack Cornwell and he certainly seems to fit the criteria so I will take the plunge:

What astronomical object links the island of St Helena with Florence Cathedral?

(Note: question updated so that there is a single definite answer, consistent with the guidance)
Wild random guess -- Napoleon's telescope for observing the night skies (looted from the treasures of Florence Cathedral while he was conquering Europe)? :E
 

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