InterRail pass validity in the UK for UK nationals - nationality vs country of residence.

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Clansman

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As the title says. I am hoping to clarify the validity of InterRail passes to be used in the UK.

Given InterRail tickets cannot be used in your own country (unless for exiting/entering it at the start/end of your European trip), I am curious as to what the rules are for this. The terms and conditions state that where there is a conflict between nationality and country of residence, then the latter takes precedence.

So does anybody know if this is definitley the case, and how this works for what counts as suitable residence.

And if so, theoretically, would this allow British passport holders who simply live in another EU country (Ireland or France for example) for whatever reason, to be able to take advantage of the excellent price:flexibility ratio that these passes offer compared to buying normal rail tickets which are extortiate for those needing to travel weekly medium-long distance journeys within a 3 month window.
 
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alistairlees

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As the title says. I am hoping to clarify the validity of InterRail passes to be used in the UK.

Given InterRail tickets cannot be used in your own country (unless for exiting/entering it at the start/end of your European trip), I am curious as to what the rules are for this. The terms and conditions state that where there is a conflict between nationality and country of residence, then the latter takes precedence.

So does anybody know if this is definitley the case, and how this works for what counts as suitable residence.

And if so, theoretically, would this allow British passport holders who simply live in another EU country (Ireland or France for example) for whatever reason, to be able to take advantage of the excellent price:flexibility ratio that these passes offer compared to buying normal rail tickets which are extortiate for those needing to travel weekly medium-long distance journeys within a 3 month window.
It is just residency that counts, though I am not sure that what constitutes residency is defined. I imagine it means your main residence though.

I'm sure it's just a slip of the keyboard, but, as Britain is no longer in the EU, then British passport holders can longer be living in "another EU country". :lol: It's going to take some time to adjust.
 

Clansman

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It is just residency that counts, though I am not sure that what constitutes residency is defined. I imagine it means your main residence though.

I'm sure it's just a slip of the keyboard, but, as Britain is no longer in the EU, then British passport holders can longer be living in "another EU country". :lol: It's going to take some time to adjust.
Many thanks :)

I need to start getting into the habbit of saying 'European' next time round!
 

CyrusWuff

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The Knowledgebase guidance for inspecting an Interrail pass is to check the issuing country, that the name on the pass matches that on your passport or ID card and that you've correctly completed the travel diary (and dated a box if it's a flexipass). No mention is made of checking residency.
 

Gloster

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When I bought an Interrail pass while living in Sweden nearly thirty years ago, I had to show my passport on one occasion during a two day visit to the UK: I travelled Dover-Frome-Worthing-Dover, so around eight trains. What the guard made of the Swedish residence permit that was stamped in the passport, I know not, but it was enough to satisfy him.
 
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etr221

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For some purpose I forget, I was looking into 'resident' definition, and for varied legal/official purposes came across the concepts of being normally, ordinarily, habitually or statutorally resident - to what extent (if any - one 'guide for decision makers' ended up saying 'use your judgement') they were stricltly defined I don't recall, if I ever knew. So ... good luck.

And when I was living in America, I did one year conclude that I was a resident of the State of Illinois (based on their definition) but not of the USA (based on theirs) for income tax purposes.
 

1955LR

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I agree, Residency will have different definitions in different countries, we even had different definitions between England and Scotland when we had the "Poll" tax, which meant you could be resident in both countries and have to pay the tax twice
 

Tazi Hupefi

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I'd be interested to get an answer here:

1) I hold a British passport
2) I also hold a permanent residence ID for Belize as well as driving license, insurance card etc.

In normal times, I try to split my time 50/50 between the UK and Belize.

I looked at buying a Britrail pass, but was concerned that it wanted a passport number writing in a box and then being stamped by a UK station. I suspected they wouldn't accept a UK passport, but maybe they would?
 

Watershed

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I'd be interested to get an answer here:

1) I hold a British passport
2) I also hold a permanent residence ID for Belize as well as driving license, insurance card etc.

In normal times, I try to split my time 50/50 between the UK and Belize.

I looked at buying a Britrail pass, but was concerned that it wanted a passport number writing in a box and then being stamped by a UK station. I suspected they wouldn't accept a UK passport, but maybe they would?
According to the eligibility and conditions shown on the Britrail website, I see no reason why a British passport holder couldn't use a Britrail pass - provided they had not lived in the UK in the 6 months preceding the purchase or validation of the pass.

Of course you are right that it could raise eyebrows, but the scenario of a British expat making a short to medium length trip back to their home country is by no means unheard of.

I think as long as you have something which indicates that you live outside of the UK (e.g. a bill of some description, driving licence etc.) then you would probably be OK.

A foreign passport would likely be seen as the clearest indication of foreign residency of all (even though it proves no such thing!).

As for the following scenario:
And if so, theoretically, would this allow British passport holders who simply live in another EU country (Ireland or France for example) for whatever reason, to be able to take advantage of the excellent price:flexibility ratio that these passes offer compared to buying normal rail tickets which are extortiate for those needing to travel weekly medium-long distance journeys within a 3 month window.
Again, there is no reason why you could not do so, but you would have to be very careful that you did not exceed the 6 month residency test. I think it would be advisable to carry proof of residence.

Bear in mind that suspicions of misuse may arise, particularly in the context of travel that is obviously business-like as opposed to the tourist-like use the pass is aimed at.
 

All Line Rover

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Bear in mind that suspicions of misuse may arise, particularly in the context of travel that is obviously business-like as opposed to the tourist-like use the pass is aimed at.

If a European resident visits the UK for a few weeks on a business trip (for example, to visit UK clients scattered across the country), is there any reason why they cannot use a Britrail pass exclusively for business travel? Likewise, if a European resident is seconded to the UK for a few months on business, is there any reason why they cannot use a Britrail pass exclusively for commuting?
 
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Watershed

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If a European resident visits the UK for a few weeks on a business trip (for example, to visit UK clients scattered across the country), if there any reason why they cannot use a Britrail pass exclusively for business travel?
No. But it's not in line with what Britrail passes are aimed at.

So if, for example, a Britrail pass holder presents on the 07:20 Reading to Paddington in first class, Monday to Friday two months on the trot, wearing a suit and tie and working on a laptop, there is a higher likelihood of suspicions of misuse arising than if they travel on the 13:44 from Oxford to Moreton in Marsh, wearing 'civvies' and looking at a tourist guide to the Cotswolds.
 
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RT4038

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If a European resident visits the UK for a few weeks on a business trip (for example, to visit UK clients scattered across the country), if there any reason why they cannot use a Britrail pass exclusively for business travel?
I don't see why not. Britrail is marketed as a tourist product, but could be used for business travel.
According to the eligibility and conditions shown on the Britrail website, I see no reason why a British passport holder couldn't use a Britrail pass - provided they had not lived in the UK in the 6 months preceding the purchase or validation of the pass.

Of course you are right that it could raise eyebrows, but the scenario of a British expat making a short to medium length trip back to their home country is by no means unheard of.

I think as long as you have something which indicates that you live outside of the UK (e.g. a bill of some description, driving licence etc.) then you would probably be OK.
I've used a Britrail pass with a UK passport, whilst resident outside of the UK. No problems at all. Would advise some kind of residency document, particularly if there are no stamps in the passport showing entry and exit in your country of residence.
 

b0b

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And when I was living in America, I did one year conclude that I was a resident of the State of Illinois (based on their definition) but not of the USA (based on theirs) for income tax purposes.
Being an ex-pat in Illinois, the state just wants your money. :lol:
 

dutchflyer

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On a more general view: this applies to all participating countries. F.e. me as dutch can use INterrail, 2 monthes for 5/600 eur (there is a sale of 20% right now and I am senior) to travel in Germany and even all of Europe-DB and others, whereas a german would need to buy a BahnCard100 for at least a 1000 eur-for 3 monthes domestic use only.
In fact nearly all EUR countries have a fairly rigidly enforced system of persons needing to registrate at whatever form of local council office-this will also having them you to charge for taxes and things like refuse removal etc. It varies a little bit, but in most cases starts after 6 monthes of uninterrupted stay. You will as a foreigner then being issued with some form of entitlement to stay-a bit like the US greencard. THAT is according to the official rules the thing to produce for claims like travel in the country of your passpt/IDcard (the latter is far more common for travel here).
And yes-I once took the chance to go for it, travel 1st for 3 weeks and use it extensively-incl, use of lounges, in the UK. Also on a heavy bisnismenny suited like at 7.40 or so from LON on the east coast main line-without any probs, thank you all british conductors for their welcome and trust.
 
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