Isle of Wight Island Line

Status
Not open for further replies.

Ministry

Member
Joined
22 Nov 2010
Messages
57
I read that SWT are responsible for maintaining the infrastructure as part of the terms of the Island Line franchise and given that they hold no such responsibility for infrastructure on the mainland network I am curious about the practical implications of this agreement.

This article about Colas Rail TUPE'ing staff to Island Line (http://www.tssa.org.uk/en/Your-unio...ture-maintenance-isle-of-wight-to-island-line) suggests that SWT now have in-house capabilities as far as engineering and track working staff is concerned, but other details seem to be thin on the ground. For instance, do SWT have a stockpile of track and signalling equipment or do they just allocate a budget and purchase equipment as required? And do they have any set investment targets for the line or is it about patching things up to keep it in operation rather than proactively investing in upgrades?

Also, having recently travelled on the line, I noticed that large parts of it are out in the sticks without road access, so presumably any equipment must be transported by rail rather than road. However the only rolling stock on the line that I can find details for are the class 483s, so how do they transport staff and materials to site when required?

Any further information would be appreciated!!
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

Chris125

Established Member
Joined
12 Nov 2009
Messages
2,648
I believe day-to-day maintenance is carried out in-house but more major work is up to Network Rail. As the line is only 8 miles long, uses jointed track on wooden sleepers and is only used by short, lightweight tube stock it rarely needs more than spot renewals, for which road-rail vehicles are quite adequate most of the time, though they did borrow an 03 and some ballast wagons a few years ago for track renewal near Lake.

The next large infrastructure project will probably involve resignalling which i think NR are looking at post 2018. Its been suggested that could involve a loop at Brading and rationalisation/removal of the double track to allow a half-hourly service and the IoWSR to access Ryde St Johns.

Chris
 

wintonian

Established Member
Joined
15 Jan 2010
Messages
4,889
Location
Hampshire
I believe day-to-day maintenance is carried out in-house but more major work is up to Network Rail. As the line is only 8 miles long, uses jointed track on wooden sleepers and is only used by short, lightweight tube stock it rarely needs more than spot renewals, for which road-rail vehicles are quite adequate most of the time, though they did borrow an 03 and some ballast wagons a few years ago for track renewal near Lake.

The next large infrastructure project will probably involve resignalling which i think NR are looking at post 2018. Its been suggested that could involve a loop at Brading and rationalisation/removal of the double track to allow a half-hourly service and the IoWSR to access Ryde St Johns.

Chris

You appear to be correct:

The infrastructure on the island is leased to the operator, a situation unique on the British railway network. A 25 year lease between the landlord, Railtrack plc, and the lessee, Island Line Limited, governs the responsibilities for maintenance and renewal of the infrastructure since 1994. Island Line is responsible for the maintenance of the infrastructure generally e.g. track, signalling, electrification equipment and buildings, however Railtrack is responsible for the maintenance of structures, earthworks and the formation below 450mm from the underside of the sleepers. Railtrack is responsible for renewals except permanent way and the non-structural elements of stations.

Isle of Wight Council
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top