Most Under Employed Class Of Locomotive?

Discussion in 'Traction & Rolling Stock' started by Modron, 9 Feb 2019.

  1. 43096

    43096 Established Member

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    Basically EWS ordered far too many locos - probably around 100-150 too many - to support Ed Burkhardt’s fantasy growth plan. In some ways, though, it wasn’t the EWS 66s that killed the 60s but the Freightliner and GBRf ones as those companies took contracts off EWS.

    Although the 66s were leased, that is not to say the 60s were cost free: they would have to be depreciated via a hit to the profit and loss account each year.
     
  2. 70014IronDuke

    70014IronDuke Established Member

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    And British Steel, at least at Corby.
     
  3. xotGD

    xotGD Established Member

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    The Claytons must be in with a shout. Didn't exactly have a long service life.
     
  4. KevinTurvey

    KevinTurvey Member

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    The class 58's seemed to come and go in the blinking of an eye as well. Its hard to believe its now 20 years since they started being withdrawn from UK service, anyway some only after 13 years.
     
  5. randyrippley

    randyrippley Established Member

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    the 58s are relatively long lived compared with the 41/42/43 Warships and the 22 baby Warships. But you've also got to look at the history of the MetroVicks (how many times were they mothballed?) and the class 83 & 84 electrics, both of which spent a lot of time hidden away from sight
     
  6. reddragon

    reddragon Member

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    The class 21s always win.

    They were built, delivered and did not work. (The Eastern Region just dumped them out of site & they were sent back). After heavy mods, they'd go out catch fire, gutted above the sole bar and dragged back to keep others workable. I read at best 20% would be available at any one time and they were based next door to the North British factory so they could keep making new parts for them. So bad were they that they went out in pairs, so effectively only 5 diagrams could be covered out of 58 locos.

    NBL then went bust with them months old and 20 locos beyond repair were rebuilt with new parts as class 29s. The rest were stored then scrapped.

    At least the NER electric locos worked when asked!
     

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