Rail Freight Flows and News UK

ac6000cw

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Aggregates are generally more dense than coal, so you can reach the axle-load limit (25 tonnes in the UK) with a shorter hopper wagon if filled with aggregates. Shorter wagons mean a higher-payload train is possible within the maximum train length limit.
 
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AndrewE

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You have got the wrong end of the stick.

Up to now the wagons have been ex coal bogie hoppers which are longer and cannot be fully filled with stone without going overweight. By cutting 10ft+ out of the length of each wagon, they can still be loaded to 102 tonnes but more wagons can fit in a given length.
Thank you. That makes sense now.
 

3973EXL

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Apologies, but I like precise figures when talking about Loading, used to be my job.

RA10 maximum axle weight is 25.5t
Hence, as stated, a four axle vehicle has a maximum GLW of 102t & a two axle vehicle a maximum GLW of 51t.

A high volume vehicle also has the added disadvantage, when loaded with a high density product, of reaching its weight limit before filling the vehicle.
This can lead to an imbalance in the weight distribution, overloading axles and/or wheels from one side/end to the other.
 

pmb

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Looking at RTT listings for Doncaster today, I came across a schedule for a STP 6M35 11:25 Arcow Quarry to Elstow Redlands Gbrf. https://www.realtimetrains.co.uk/train/R04894/2020-02-28/detailed Have I just missed this before or is it a new thing? It isn't showing for the last 7 days.
The sidings have also received 2 loaded trainloads from Mountsorrel today, presumably DB operated. They often receive only one, according to RTT.
 

Freightmaster

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Looking at RTT listings for Doncaster today, I came across a schedule for a STP 6M35 11:25 Arcow Quarry to Elstow Redlands Gbrf. https://www.realtimetrains.co.uk/train/R04894/2020-02-28/detailed Have I just missed this before or is it a new thing?
It hasn't run for a while, but it was fairly regular for a period last year, typically on a Monday or Friday.

(there is a similar 'as required' working From Arcow to Scunthorpe, too)


MARK
 

furnessvale

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Thanks for that. :D
Some quarries in that area specifically supply chippings as in "tar and chippings" road surface dressing. If Arcow supply that, it could well be the case that a single trainload would keep an area going for some time, making for infrequent trains to otherwise limestone receiving terminals.

I have no idea if that is the case.
 

158756

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Not news about a specific flow, but the latest freight statistics from the ORR make grim reading. https://dataportal.orr.gov.uk/statistics/usage/freight-rail-usage-and-performance/

Freight moved (weight x distance) fell 8% in Q3 2019-20 compared with the year before. Freight lifted (weight) fell 20%. Both measures are the lowest since the quarterly time series began in the 90s. Freight lifted excluding coal fell 13%.. Every sector except intermodal (which was flat) shrank.

Not sure if this warrants a new thread.
 

EvoIV

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With rumours abound of huge decreases (c. 50%) of maritime boxes to be shifted in the upcoming months, it might only be a temporary reprieve for intermodal.
 

Oxfordblues

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I would caution against the phrase "temporary reprieve". Whilst there'll undoubtedly be a marked downturn in deep-sea intermodal flows for the duration of the current coronavirus crisis, the medium-term outlook for rail-freight is encouraging. Indeed I believe we are witnessing the end of the "golden age" of unfettered road haulage. The trucking industry is facing a "perfect storm" of issues which are reducing their competitive advantage over rail:
1. A critical shortage of HGV drivers in the UK: depending on whom you believe it could be as many as 30,000. In order to secure sufficient driver hauliers will need to increase wages and therefore rates to customers.
2. An end to the 10-year freeze on fuel duty is expected in Wednesday's budget. Failure to increase the duty in line with inflation has amounted to a hidden subsidy to road hauliers.
3. Increasing traffic congestion on many trunk roads which have reached saturation at peak times. Safety concerns over "smart motorways" have shelved plans to increase their scope.
4. The "Greta Thunberg effect". Polluting diesel lorries are accused of exacerbating the climate emergency and rail is seen as a green alternative, especially if bi-mode traction can be deployed. The "less CO2" slogans on Tesco containers illustrate the trend.
Much of what has been lost to road haulage of the years will never be won back, but it's significant that even the most high-profile trucker Eddie Stobart has recently had to be rescued from collapse.
 

BRX

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Screen Shot 2020-03-09 at 21.03.27.jpg
Not news about a specific flow, but the latest freight statistics from the ORR make grim reading. https://dataportal.orr.gov.uk/statistics/usage/freight-rail-usage-and-performance/

Freight moved (weight x distance) fell 8% in Q3 2019-20 compared with the year before. Freight lifted (weight) fell 20%. Both measures are the lowest since the quarterly time series began in the 90s. Freight lifted excluding coal fell 13%.. Every sector except intermodal (which was flat) shrank.

Not sure if this warrants a new thread.
From the graph the general trend doesn't appear so bad (if you ignore coal of course)
 

BRX

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In the last couple of weeks a flow of steel from Margam to Dollands Moor and on through the tunnel has (re) started.

This used to run regularly until about 5 years ago. When that stopped, what i understood to be a replacement started running from Margam to Thamseport (I gathered the steel was transferred to road there, for onwards transport to the continent). I'm not quite clear whether the new service through the tunnel replaces that, or is in addition. Either way, nice to see something additional running through the tunnel for once.
 

Freightmaster

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I saw the Daventry-Wentloog train today and it was hauled by a DBC class 66 (I don't yet now the number). Has this flow switched from DRS?
Today's train was worked by 66108, which is one of five 66/0s DRS bought from DBC last Autumn.


MARK
 

muddythefish

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This article in Global Railway mentions a freight flow including food and medicines between west London and Cornwall but I'm not aware of any such working. Can anyone shed light on this?

https://www.globalrailwayreview.com/news/98765/network-rail-teams-move-vital-supplies-one-week/
The amount of food being moved on the railway by freight across Wales and between west London and Cornwall this week has increased by 20 per cent.

It has been possible to meet this demand thanks to dedication of Network Rail teams who have continued to work as they are listed as key workers by the government and the help of passengers who have taken advice of only to travel when it is essential.
 
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jimm

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This article in Global Railway mentions a freight flow including food and medicines between west London and Cornwall but I'm not aware of any such working. Can anyone shed light on this?

https://www.globalrailwayreview.com/news/98765/network-rail-teams-move-vital-supplies-one-week/
I would suspect a poorly-worded Network Rail press release that was trying to outline the geographical area that the Western Route covers, which got jumbled up with what is being moved - the bulk of it seems to be going into and out of South Wales.
 

ABB125

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What traction is typically used on DRS nuclear trains these days? Is it still generally pairs of class 37s? According to Ian Walmseley, 2 class 88s are also used.
Does the traction vary by route, for example Berkeley/Bridgewater to Crewe trains always using class 37s?
 

ExRes

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What traction is typically used on DRS nuclear trains these days? Is it still generally pairs of class 37s? According to Ian Walmseley, 2 class 88s are also used.
Does the traction vary by route, for example Berkeley/Bridgewater to Crewe trains always using class 37s?
I don't follow nuclear traffic specifically by any means but I believe 37s have been replaced either by 66s or by 68/88 pairings, I wait to be proved wrong though ......
 

Far north 37

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What traction is typically used on DRS nuclear trains these days? Is it still generally pairs of class 37s? According to Ian Walmseley, 2 class 88s are also used.
Does the traction vary by route, for example Berkeley/Bridgewater to Crewe trains always using class 37s?
a 68/88 pairing seems to be the most regulary used two 66s still work the dounreay service to and from georgmas.
 

ABB125

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I don't follow nuclear traffic specifically by any means but I believe 37s have been replaced either by 66s or by 68/88 pairings, I wait to be proved wrong though ......
a 68/88 pairing seems to be the most regulary used two 66s still work the dounreay service to and from georgmas.
Thanks.
Since all nuclear workings are double-headed, are both engines "switched on", or is one shut down for environmental/cost reasons, only being turned on if required? (Although I suppose both locomotives will need to be used during the overall journey as the front locomotive will swap over on the return journey if a run-round loop is used.) Is it possible for an "off" locomotive to be used to drive a coupled "on" locomotive, when the "off" one is on the front?
 

Far north 37

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Thanks.
Since all nuclear workings are double-headed, are both engines "switched on", or is one shut down for environmental/cost reasons, only being turned on if required? (Although I suppose both locomotives will need to be used during the overall journey as the front locomotive will swap over on the return journey if a run-round loop is used.) Is it possible for an "off" locomotive to be used to drive a coupled "on" locomotive, when the "off" one is on the front?
Think just one loco is operating the second one is just for insurace due to the nature of the load the georgmas one runs top and tail though.
 

BRX

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The Dungeness one that used to be 37s or 20s is now a pair of 68s (and runs much less frequently than 5 or 10 years ago).

When it was 37s or 20s I think both locos were on, now I'm not sure if that's the case with the 68s, will have to check next time I see it.
 

OGLO

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Apologies if this appears elsewhere, but does anyone know why certain MGR workings from The North East (mainly to Drax) are running with 42 wagons rather than the usual 22? There's usually a dead loco in tow, too.
 

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