Rail replacement buses - correct term?

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GuyBarry

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A quick question about terminology:

What's the generally accepted term for a bus that's run instead of a scheduled rail service? "Rail replacement bus" seems to be the standard term, though train operators will often call it a "replacement bus service" and bus operators a "rail replacement service".

However, I've noticed recently that it's increasingly often referred to as a "bus replacement service". To my mind this seems illogical, as though it were a replacement for a bus. (There have been one or two isolated examples of trains replacing buses, but it's hardly the norm.)

Also, is there a terminological distinction between buses that are run because a section of line is temporarily closed, and buses that are run because the rail service has been withdrawn completely?
 
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Rail replacement bus is probably the most common, but it's kind of the same as asking "Is it a railway station, rail station or train station?".

GuyBarry said:
Also, is there a terminological distinction between buses that are run because a section of line is temporarily closed, and buses that are run because the rail service has been withdrawn completely?
Withdrawn completely for x amount of time or withdrawn due to the actual rail service being taken away? I wouldn't say there is any difference between a bus substituting for a rail service either for enigineering work or due to a problem on the line, but where the line has been completely closed and there is no chance of trains running again on it is a different matter - indeed some areas that lost their rail service and had buses as replacements will be advertised on National Rail and in the UK timetables (e.g. from York to Whitby, the buses are still advertised on National Rail).
 

Welshman

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Another interesting difference between a Rail Replacement Bus and a regular replacement bus service initiated on the closure of a railway line, is that the first is still a "train" as far as ticketting arrangements are concerned, but the second is a bus.

For example, tickets bought with my Senior Rail card are valid on the first, but my Welsh Bus pass is not valid on the second in England or Scotland.

And the cynic in me says the second is not likely to survive the railway service for very long, although there have been some notable exceptions, like the X94 Wrexham-Barmouth service.
 

Schnellzug

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Another interesting difference between a Rail Replacement Bus and a regular replacement bus service initiated on the closure of a railway line, is that the first is still a "train" as far as ticketting arrangements are concerned, but the second is a bus..
That always amuses me. Admittedly, between here and the next principal station, there isn't that much difference between train and the fares charged by the First bus company, but to charge Rail fares for a ride in the same, slightly worn around the edges, Olympians that they use on local routes seems a bit of a liberty to me.
 

bus man

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The legal term is rail replacement , I am not sure if it still applies but if a bus was used on a rail replacement then it didnt need a tacho, therefore operators always used that term as it allowed them to use any bus / coach .
 
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