Reopening Of Schools

What level of restrictions should we have in schools?

  • No restrictions - back to normal

    Votes: 59 64.1%
  • Distancing in secondary schools only

    Votes: 15 16.3%
  • Distancing in all schools

    Votes: 5 5.4%
  • Masks and distancing in all schools

    Votes: 7 7.6%
  • Schools shouldn’t be opening yet

    Votes: 6 6.5%

  • Total voters
    92
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Jamiescott1

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Year groups in bubbles
Teachers stay 2 metres from kids
Staggered arrival, departure and break times
Sanitiser on entry to rooms
Enhanced cleaning of touch points in communal areas
Too impractical to clean classrooms between lessons
 
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trebor79

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The government should be focussing on emphasising to parents just now important education and schooling is, and that keeping children at home has negative consequences too, which almost certainly outweigh any risk from them being there. It would of course help if people trusted Johnson and co, which now I’m not sure anyone does.

Ultimately however if that group *still* wish to keep their children off then it’s up to them, however it is absolutely not the the taxpayer to then be making financial provisions to enable this.
No, it really isn't up to them as the taxpayer will be picking up the tab to support their uneducated offspring for the rest of their lives. Not to mention the antisocial and criminal behaviour poorly educated no hopers tend to engage in.
 

py_megapixel

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No, it really isn't up to them as the taxpayer will be picking up the tab to support their uneducated offspring for the rest of their lives. Not to mention the antisocial and criminal behaviour poorly educated no hopers tend to engage in.
If people genuinely care too little about their children, or as I said earlier are of the sovereign-citizen "I'm not doing anything I'm told, I have rights to ruin my child's life" persuasion, then forget fining them: they should not be allowed to raise children.
 

peters

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At least one secondary. Might just be some lower years....
This is what my children's secondary have said

Government guidance to schools states that “When timetabling, groups should be kept apart and movement around the school site kept to a minimum”. We have therefore made the decision that for the start of term at least, students in Years 7, 8 and 9 will be taught in their form class bases with teachers travelling to classrooms to deliver KS3 lessons. Students will engage with their PE lessons as usual and there will be limited movement within the Year 9 ‘bubble’ to facilitate setting arrangements. Year groups will be clustered in the following areas of school: Year 7 – Humanities and Languages Year 8 – Maths & RE Classrooms Year 9 – English Classrooms

Students in KS4 and KS5 will be able to access teaching rooms across school site. This is to facilitate access to specialist rooms and equipment necessary for external examination courses. Social distancing markers are in place across the school site and we have recalibrated the current one way system to ensure we are compliant with the Government guidance which states “While passing briefly in the corridor or playground is low risk, schools should avoid creating busy corridors, entrances and exits.”
This will definitely affect what years 7, 8 & 9 can do. For instance, they won't have a science lesson in a science lab or a design and technology lesson in a workshop. It also sounds like more mixed ability teaching groups will be used for the lower school.
 

peters

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They must be mixing ability; it could be based on some sort of 'compromise' but it won't be good for students.

I'm aware of schools that do mixed ability for many subjects in KS3, but never for Maths, English or Science.

I've even known Computing and Sports to be lumped together (and yes that does mean all boy or all girl groups in Computing lessons)
My children's school normally lumps Maths and Science together for KS3 meaning if a child is in the top Maths set then they need to be in the top half of sets for Science. For KS4 all pupils have Maths, Science and English lessons at the same time meaning theoretically they could be in the top set for Maths, bottom set for Science and a middle set for English.
 

Pete_uk

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An ex work colleague is heavily pregnant and also has a child around 6 or 7. She's quite angry that face masks are not enforced indoors and she is going to be home schooling come September.

I think she's a been a bit panicked by it all.
 

adc82140

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Gavin Williamson (yes I know) has said that the risk of transmission in schools is very low. He is citing some international research done where schools have already reopened.



Mr Williamson also referred to the "latest research, which is expected to be published later this year - one of the largest studies on the coronavirus in schools in the world", saying it "makes it clear there is little evidence that the virus is transmitted at school"

He is believed to be referring to a forthcoming report to be released by Public Health England
 
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jtuk

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Fully back to normal.

If I gave you the numbers 45 and 477, and asked you to assign one to each of these statements:

- the number of under 15s that have died of Covid in the US
- the number of under 18s that died of flu last year in the US

Which way round would you put it?
 

Richard Scott

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An ex work colleague is heavily pregnant and also has a child around 6 or 7. She's quite angry that face masks are not
pisi enforced indoors and she is going to be home schooling come September.

I think she's a been a bit panicked by it all.
Face masks should not be enforced in schools because a few people are panicked by it. This is why we are in the position we are as politicians try and pander. Admittedly probably due to their fear mongering in the first place.
 

py_megapixel

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Fully back to normal.

If I gave you the numbers 45 and 477, and asked you to assign one to each of these statements:

- the number of under 15s that have died of Covid in the US
- the number of under 18s that died of flu last year in the US

Which way round would you put it?
We all know that children suffer symptoms less often. But the schools were closed largely because it is thought possible to carry the virus asymptomatically which could lead to a risk of children spreading it to very vulnerable people.

Many parents, quite reasonably in my opinion, are still going to be concerned by that.

As an aside, which way round those numbers go doesn't really matter. They're a similar order of magnitude if you're talking about the millions of young people in the US.
 

yorkie

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As an aside, which way round those numbers go doesn't really matter. They're a similar order of magnitude if you're talking about the millions of young people in the US.
I don't understand; the stats show significantly more dying of 'flu (though a direct comparison isn't possible as the 'flu figure goes up to 18 rather than 15).
 

py_megapixel

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I don't understand; the stats show significantly more dying of 'flu (though a direct comparison isn't possible as the 'flu figure goes up to 18 rather than 15).
But, very approximately, there's 74 million under 18s and 62 million under 15s in the US.

That's 0.0006% of under 18s dying from flu, and 0.00007% of under 15s dying from Covid. Both are pretty small numbers, and yes the Covid figure is smaller, but given Covid hasn't been around for the majority of the last year, and also given that measures to stop it were put in place for Covid, I don't think it's a fair comparison.
 

adc82140

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We all know that children suffer symptoms less often. But the schools were closed largely because it is thought possible to carry the virus asymptomatically which could lead to a risk of children spreading it to very vulnerable people.

Many parents, quite reasonably in my opinion, are still going to be concerned by that.
But there is no evidence of Yr 6 children, of the children of key workers bringing it home from school.
 

ainsworth74

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I'm still very confused why we're still speaking of furlough as if it's a choice made by the employee rather than a decision made by the employer to place them on furlough rather than make them redundant? If there was no furlough scheme then the people who are accused of "gallivanting around the beaches" or similar would still be able to do so as they'd be unemployed. It seems, therefore, very odd to be blaming individuals rather than businesses as it is the businesses who need to bring them back to work. The employee has no real say in the matter.
 

Ianno87

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I'm still very confused why we're still speaking of furlough as if it's a choice made by the employee rather than a decision made by the employer to place them on furlough rather than make them redundant? If there was no furlough scheme then the people who are accused of "gallivanting around the beaches" or similar would still be able to do so as they'd be unemployed. It seems, therefore, very odd to be blaming individuals rather than businesses as it is the businesses who need to bring them back to work. The employee has no real say in the matter.
Agree. If anybody got some paid time of work, well.... you might as well enjoy it! Just need to be prepared to return to work as soon as is requested by your employer.

I suspect resentment from some posters that they haven't been "lucky*"
 

adc82140

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Not from their kids they haven't
Otherwise there would be outbreaks traceable back to the same schools.
 

Scrotnig

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I'm still very confused why we're still speaking of furlough as if it's a choice made by the employee rather than a decision made by the employer to place them on furlough rather than make them redundant? If there was no furlough scheme then the people who are accused of "gallivanting around the beaches" or similar would still be able to do so as they'd be unemployed. It seems, therefore, very odd to be blaming individuals rather than businesses as it is the businesses who need to bring them back to work. The employee has no real say in the matter.
Indeed but there is a section of those people who have taken to very loudly shouting all over social media, demanding longer lockdowns, stricter regulations, etc etc. The strong suspicion is that these people (a) have too much time on their hands that they are unable to use constructively and (b) hate their jobs and so have a vested interest in prolonging the misery for everyone else in the mistaken hope that the government will then keep sending them free money indefinitely.

It's a minority but it is a fairly large and *extremely* vocal minority.
 

DavidB

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I'm still very confused why we're still speaking of furlough as if it's a choice made by the employee rather than a decision made by the employer to place them on furlough rather than make them redundant? If there was no furlough scheme then the people who are accused of "gallivanting around the beaches" or similar would still be able to do so as they'd be unemployed. It seems, therefore, very odd to be blaming individuals rather than businesses as it is the businesses who need to bring them back to work. The employee has no real say in the matter.
I think that many employers are taking a softly-softly approach if people are claiming to be too terrified to come back into an office or other busy environment. This can't continue for much longer.

And yes, there are also no doubt employers who don't want them back as they (the employers) are beter off financially without them, at least at the moment. This is where we may see redundancies.
 

Scrotnig

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I think that many employers are taking a softly-softly approach if people are claiming to be too terrified to come back into an office or other busy environment. This can't continue for much longer.

And yes, there are also no doubt employers who don't want them back as they (the employers) are beter off financially without them, at least at the moment. This is where we may see redundancies.
Yes, that's where such people are making a big mistake.

If your employer is closed down completely, or nearly completely, then furlough makes sense. It's a great scheme and one of the few things this government have done well.
If however your employer has mostly opened back up, but you persuade them to keep you furloughed because you're terrified - well you've just demonstrated to your employer how much they DON'T actually need you at all! You can now look forward to immediate redundancy the moment the government stops the supply of free money by ending the furlough scheme.
 

Ken H

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An ex work colleague is heavily pregnant and also has a child around 6 or 7. She's quite angry that face masks are not enforced indoors and she is going to be home schooling come September.

I think she's a been a bit panicked by it all.
Why? children very vary rarely get ill with it. More likely to get struck bu lightning.
 

Ken H

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Yes, that's where such people are making a big mistake.

If your employer is closed down completely, or nearly completely, then furlough makes sense. It's a great scheme and one of the few things this government have done well.
If however your employer has mostly opened back up, but you persuade them to keep you furloughed because you're terrified - well you've just demonstrated to your employer how much they DON'T actually need you at all! You can now look forward to immediate redundancy the moment the government stops the supply of free money by ending the furlough scheme.
Like now. Employers have to pay employers NI for furloughed staff from 1st Aug. I think thats 11%. 11% of £2,500 is a fair wedge.
 

Puffing Devil

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Gavin Williamson (yes I know) has said that the risk of transmission in schools is very low. He is citing some international research done where schools have already reopened.

Looks like Mr Williamson may not be quite correct. Or that spread in schools may be limited, though the ankle biters are very good spreaders out of school.

New Evidence Suggests Young Children Spread Covid-19 More Efficiently Than Adults
Two new studies, though from different parts of the world, have arrived at the same conclusion: that young children not only transmit SARS-CoV-2 efficiently, but may be major drivers of the pandemic as well. (Forbes - Article Link)
 

Ken H

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Looks like Mr Williamson may not be quite correct. Or that spread in schools may be limited, though the ankle biters are very good spreaders out of school.
The ankle biters are all playing together here. no social distancing or anything. Not seen anyone sanitising the swings after their kids use them (kinds run wild here as its remote)
You see teenagers on gaggles around town and by the river.
If kid dont have a frail granny at home, probably the kids and their parents see no real risk.
 

DavidB

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Looks like Mr Williamson may not be quite correct. Or that spread in schools may be limited, though the ankle biters are very good spreaders out of school.
So why haven't lots of spikes been traced to schools? Those two studies cited are both theoretical and neither seem to actually demonstrate the claims in practice - if it was true, there would surely be some evidence of it actually happening by now!
 

DavidB

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The ankle biters are all playing together here. no social distancing or anything. Not seen anyone sanitising the swings after their kids use them (kinds run wild here as its remote)
You see teenagers on gaggles around town and by the river.
If kid dont have a frail granny at home, probably the kids and their parents see no real risk.
Same round here! The weed smokers in the local park have been there after dark pretty much throughout!
 

adc82140

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The ankle biters are all playing together here. no social distancing or anything. Not seen anyone sanitising the swings after their kids use them (kinds run wild here as its remote)
You see teenagers on gaggles around town and by the river.
If kid dont have a frail granny at home, probably the kids and their parents see no real risk.
Here's an interesting question. How many kids do live with their grandparents? I'd say not many, but from the way the media carry on you'd think it was part of the normal family unit.
 

Ken H

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Here's an interesting question. How many kids do live with their grandparents? I'd say not many, but from the way the media carry on you'd think it was part of the normal family unit.
Its a cultural thing i think. Think its very common amongst people with a S Asian ethnicity, which is one reason cited for their high incidence of COVID. Indigenous whites tend to stick granny in a home more.
maybe the 2011 census data will help with your question. I am just going on hearsay.

its also very common in Italy which is, perhaps, why COVID was bad there.
 

ainsworth74

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Looks like Mr Williamson may not be quite correct. Or that spread in schools may be limited, though the ankle biters are very good spreaders out of school.
Was this not one of the issues in Italy? They closed the schools/childcare fairly early and before most businesses so parents who needed to still go to work sent the children to granddad and grandma with tragic consequences? My hazy recollection of those days in March is that schools and businesses in the UK closed and shifted to home working much more in step with each other. Indeed didn't the schools close for all but vulnerable and key worker children on a Friday afternoon and then full lockdown followed on the Monday evening?
 
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