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Ticket platforms

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62772

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I have been told the formet excursion platform at York was originaly a ticket platform. When were ticket platforms in use? Is there a list of them?
 
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Mcr Warrior

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Certainly used to be one on the final approach into Oban station.
 

Lemmy99uk

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There was a ticket platform called “Banbury Street” on the southern approach to Birmingham New Street.

It closed in 1885 when the lines at Proof House Junction were quadrupled.
 

Mcr Warrior

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There was a ticket platform called “Banbury Street” on the southern approach to Birmingham New Street.
Minor accident there in 1873 (?) when one train ran into another.

Presumably the need for ticket inspection platforms diminished over the years as non-corridor carriage stock was gradually phased out.
 

LMS 4F

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I believe one was used at Doncaster many years ago during St Leger week. For those who don’t know that’s a classic horse race held on September.
 

etr221

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Many mainline stations had them in Victorian days, where tickets could be collected/inspected before arrival at the main station (which consequently did not need to have an arrival side side barrier)
 

Journeyman

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Isn't there one visible in the cutting heading into Liverpool Street?
 

Journeyman

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Was that ever a "ticket platform" as such or just the remains of the old Bishopsgate (Low Level) station, which closed during WW1?

I thought it was a station as well, but I saw it referred to as a ticket platform recently. Can't remember where, unfortunately.
 

30907

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I thought it was a station as well, but I saw it referred to as a ticket platform recently. Can't remember where, unfortunately.
The two may not be mutually exclusive. ISTR (but can't quickly confirm) that Waterloo tickets were collected at Vauxhall.
 

PeterC

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Was that ever a "ticket platform" as such or just the remains of the old Bishopsgate (Low Level) station, which closed during WW1?
Definitely Bishopsgate LL but as noted above there was nothing to stop dual use.
 

Taunton

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Ticket platforms really go with non-corridor stock, where tickets can just be demanded at the door of the compartment. They must have been notably inefficient, needing plenty of staff to avoid delaying the train too much who would be unproductive between trains. I wonder how they dealt with passengers with invalid or no tickets - delay the train, passenger has to get out and then no way of going forward, etc.

When was the last one?
 

DerekC

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I can remember tickets being collected at Willesden Junction on a Tring-Euston service. (The main line platforms were still there in those days).
 

FQTV

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There was one at Inverness, superseded in function by the station at Clachnaharry from 1868.

Reportedly, in the decade following, the Senior Ticket Collector at Inverness, William Kennoway, would walk to Clachnaharry to meet a train from the North.

If it was late-running, it would stop momentarily for him to board, and he might then clamber along the running-boards or, on occasion, jump between carriage rooves, and check tickets through the windows....
 
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I think in Ireland Limerick Check was a ticket platform?
Yes, definitely (Johnson's Atlas says it was used as late as 1963). The other Irish example of a "pure" ticket platform I've heard of was in Killarney, on the headshunt that (until the 1970s) every train going to/from Tralee had to use for reversal. (I'm not sure how the platform was used, as the location would have meant only trains coming from Tralee would pass the ticket platform before they got to Killarney station, whereas I'd imagine there would have been a lot more traffic for Killarney from the Mallow direction - maybe trains were backed into the headshunt to check tickets, which I suppose might have been acceptable for the once-numerous excursions.) I believe Inchicore in Dublin was also used as a ticket platform for Kingsbridge/Heuston, but this was one of those ticket platforms that had other uses (for staff shuttles and, briefly between 1901 and 1907, as a public station).
 
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