Train Failure

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RichmondCommu

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G'day,

Apologies if this comes across as being a stupid question but at the end of the day I'm a commuter with an interest in railways and nothing more!

If a train suffers a mechanical failure and is unable to continue how does the driver notify the signalman? I'm aware that all signals have a telephone to communicate with the signalman but what happens if the stationery train is some distance from the next signal? I am of course aware that the signalman will be aware that there is a problem as the train will not have cleared that particular section but its the communication between driver and guard that I'm interested in.

Thanks in advance.

Richmond Commuter
 
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chrisdmadd

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NRN cab radio should still work in most failures but if not the driver will have to either call the signaller via mobile phone (or the guard) or walk to the nearest signallers phone. After placing the neccessary emergency protection to the train that is.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
Ah ok, are all trains fitted with that?
Yes. It's the primary method of contact to and from the driver.
 

RichmondCommu

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NRN cab radio should still work in most failures but if not the driver will have to either call the signaller via mobile phone (or the guard) or walk to the nearest signallers phone. After placing the neccessary emergency protection to the train that is.
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---


Yes. It's the primary method of contact to and from the driver.
Thanks for your reply. However, please define emergency protection and why it is needed as surely the signalman will know that the stricken train has not left the section and so the previous signal will still be shown as red?
 

Clip

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Thanks for your reply. However, please define emergency protection and why it is needed as surely the signalman will know that the stricken train has not left the section and so the previous signal will still be shown as red?
S.O.P really. Better to be safe then sorry
 

ainsworth74

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However, please define emergency protection and why it is needed as surely the signalman will know that the stricken train has not left the section and so the previous signal will still be shown as red?
Depends on the nature of the failure, if the train is derailed then there is a chance that it is no longer operating the track circuits in which case the previous signal will show a proceed aspect because as far as it's concerned (this assumes it's automatic rather than controlled) the track ahead is clear.

Basically better safe than sorry!
 

chrisdmadd

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Thanks for your reply. However, please define emergency protection and why it is needed as surely the signalman will know that the stricken train has not left the section and so the previous signal will still be shown as red?
Theres many reasons for it for example if the train had become derailed you might not make the necessary track circuit therefor the signal behind showing green. In this case you place track circuit operating clips to recreate the train on the tracks ( basically ensures the signal behind stays red) It's just a precautionary method used when a train has broken down or there is an emergency. You also place warning detonators on the track too.
You of course don't do this each time a train simply breaks down but many circumstances call for emergency protection.
 

142094

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A train that has derailed and fouling an adjacent line will mean those lines need to be protected as well. However, thankfully, derailments are rare and train failures are usually mechanical.
 

WL113

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The Driver of a failed train will follow the procedures laid down in the Rule Book module M2. The Driver will contact the Signaller via an SPT, NRN, CSR or any other telephone. If the Driver cannot contact the Signaller they will carry out emergency protection.
 

driver9000

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I'm not sure why Emergency protection has been mentioned in a simple question to how a Signalman is notified of a failed train. The Driver will contact the Signalman using the nearest telephone or radio. If the Signalman can't be contacted immediately the Driver goes in the direction they deem the quickest of reaching a telephone laying Assistance protection in that direction. If it is decided assistance will come from the opposite direction then the detonators are picked up and laid in the direction assistance will come from. The only times Emergency protection is required in addition to Assistance protection is if the train has failed in any of the following situations and the Signalman can't be contacted immediately:

Single line working in the wrong direction
Pilotman working of a single or bi-directional line
Instructions in the Sectional appendix require it
Temporary block working is in operation

(Ref - M2)
 

Cherry_Picker

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A train might be considered failed if it has been derailed, so its a relevant tangent.

Everything has been covered already in the thread, but its probably worth knowing that lists of phone numbers to signal boxes can often be found in driving cabs, and can also be found in periodical operating notices which the driver should be carrying.
 

driver9000

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A train might be considered failed if it has been derailed, so its a relevant tangent.
I suppose so, but I read the original question to be asking about a 'normal' failure rather than being involved in a derailment or other situation requiring Emergency protection to be carried out so I based my answer on that :)
 

driver9000

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Thats just nature. Although Emergency protection seemed to be given as the answer to the question and I wanted to clear up that Emergency protection is only needed in a few situations when dealing with a failed train. Of course dealing with obstruction/derailment where track circuits might not be occupied then Emergency protection would be required if no contact with the Signalbox can be made. Luckily the handful of occasions when I have needed lines blocked the Signalman has been able to protect with signals.
 
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