different cross-sections of wooden sleepers

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RailAdept

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23 Jan 2018
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Hello,

I’m trying to find English equivalents of wooden sleepers with different cross-sections employed in Poland. I did some research before posting here, but unfortunately to no avail.

Here are the two types of sleepers I’m dealing with:

upload_2020-3-5_18-3-36.png

The same picutre can also be found at: https://docplayer.pl/docs-images/43/19935032/images/page_1.jpg

Literally, they translate into English: ‘beam sleepers’ (the ones from the top row) and ‘oval sleepers’ (the ones from the bottom row). Any ideas as to whether there exist English equivalents or, if not, what possible terms could be used?

Input appreciated.
 
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edwin_m

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I've never seen anything other than a rectangular cross-section for a wooden sleeper in Britain (or one that was originally rectangular but has rotted away...).
 

Dunfanaghy Rd

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Alton, Hants
British railway sleepers were, at least in BR days, 10 inches wide and 5 inches deep (approx. 130 × 255 mm). Length was 8 feet 6 inches (2.59m). Pre-nationalisation (and even pre-grouping) there were differences, principally in length. Always rectangular in section.
Pointwork is carried on timbers of 6 inches × 12 inches section (150 × 300 mm). Length according to need, of course.
HTH
Pat
 

DelW

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In my days building road bridges in the 1970s and 80s, we used hundreds, possibly thousands, of old sleepers lifted from obsolete sidings, as foundations for bridge falseworks, and without exception they were rectangular with the dimensions stated by Pat above.

If asked to describe the cross sections, I'd call them "chamfered shoulder" and "rounded shoulder", but those are purely my own invention.
 
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There are the two types here yes, I dont know what they are called nor if there is a different use for them. I do know they are not timbers used for S&C.
 
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