Duff that Pig!

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Julian G

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A trip to see cl47841 hauling Wessex Electric cl442401 at Clapham Junction..
This train was bang on time at Clapham
Duff that Pig!!
Comments appreciated..

note that this is the first time since 2001 i have seen a cl47
 
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Julian G

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joea1 said:
Good pics today, well done! The positioning is just right :). I think Freightliner are looking after their 47s too well if there was no clag!
thanks..
Sure is, Freightliner are looking well after their trains..
There was clag, but somehow I got overexcited and I forgot about it ;)
cl57s clags quite well
 

Met Driver

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joea1 said:
The positioning is just right :).

I don't want to sound cruel, but I disagree. This one has very little train in it at all. Unfortunately the angles at Clapham aren't great either, but that's partly down to the restrictive view down the platform. That's why it's sometimes better to go photting at locations other than stations.
 

Julian G

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Seth said:
joea1 said:
The positioning is just right :).

I don't want to sound cruel, but I disagree. This one has very little train in it at all. Unfortunately the angles at Clapham aren't great either, but that's partly down to the restrictive view down the platform. That's why it's sometimes better to go photting at locations other than stations.
Seth, I know what you mean if only I went to platform 4 I would had got the whole train,but I was waiting for a Silverlink Train for Clapham..
 

Coxster

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1288gaje said:
Seth said:
joea1 said:
The positioning is just right :).

I don't want to sound cruel, but I disagree. This one has very little train in it at all. Unfortunately the angles at Clapham aren't great either, but that's partly down to the restrictive view down the platform. That's why it's sometimes better to go photting at locations other than stations.
Seth, I know what you mean if only I went to platform 4 I would had got the whole train,but I was waiting for a Silverlink Train for Clapham..
So why publish a photo that is rediculous? Why not sort the good from the bad?
 

Jim

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I agree there Seth. I did a bit of linesiding on the last few weeks of 37's on the Valleys. I wished I knew what I was missing :cry:
 

Jim

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TBH, the pic that Seth posted was not a good one, as it was moving, so looks weird (if you know what I mean) People won't look at your site if they see ANY bad fots. (sorry if that sounds harsh, but you know what i am getting at)
 

Jim

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:roll: Linesiding is a term which refers to standing near the line (LEGALLY) & photing the trains.
 

bunnahabhain

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Jim said:
:roll: Linesiding is a term which refers to standing near the line (LEGALLY) & photing the trains.

Are you within the boundary of the fence? And are you within view of the driver of an approaching train or movement?
 

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Jamie C. Steel said:
Are you within the boundary of the fence? And are you within view of the driver of an approaching train or movement?

I think you know exactly what Jim means. In any case, I can assure you that he is a well behaved chap and would never dream of trespassing just for the sake of taking a photograph! As long as the photographer is behind the fence he/she can do no real harm.
 

Jim

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Seth said:
Jamie C. Steel said:
Are you within the boundary of the fence? And are you within view of the driver of an approaching train or movement?

I think you know exactly what Jim means. In any case, I can assure you that he is a well behaved chap and would never dream trespassing or just for the sake of taking a photograph! As long as the photographer is behind the fence he/she can do no real harm.

Thank you Seth, saved me some breath :lol:
 

bunnahabhain

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Standing near the line is never legal, you should be outside the boundary fence at all times, or stood near a footcrossing. He said he was standing near the line. Now that is within 3 metres of the nearest rail, so that would have been trespassing and putting his life at danger.

Read Module G2, Section 1.2 'On or near the line'.
 

devon_metro

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Jim said:
I agree there Seth. I did a bit of linesiding on the last few weeks of 37's on the Valleys. I wished I knew what I was missing :cry:

I much prefer linesiding, try and stay aways from station platforms. As long as you have a good location it is fine, that's where stations are good. It's all a viscious circle :roll:
 

devon_metro

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Jamie C. Steel said:
Standing near the line is never legal,

Now that is within 3 metres of the nearest rail, so that would have been trespassing and putting his life at danger.

So does that mean that standing on a station platform is illegal?
 

bunnahabhain

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If you are within 1.25 metres of the platform edge and you're carrying out engineering or technical work, then yes.
 

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Jamie C. Steel said:
dvn1357 said:
So does that mean that standing on a station platform is illegal?
If you are within 1.25 metres of the platform edge and you're carrying out engineering or technical work, then yes.

OK, so we've now established that it is illegal to carry out engineering or technical work within 1.25 metres of the platform edge... I'm not sure that is relevant...

Jamie C. Steel said:
Now that is within 3 metres of the nearest rail, so that would have been trespassing and putting his life at danger.

Since when does the term 'near' mean 'within 3 metres of the nearest rail'? That sounds more like an assumption to me!
 

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The Fence is at a close point to the line in some places on the valleys. Linesiding, does not state anything about how near I was
 

bunnahabhain

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Jim said:
The Fence is at a close point to the line in some places on the valleys. Linesiding, does not state anything about how near I was

Linesiding does state that you were lineside, which means that you were between the railway boundary fence and the point that is called on or near the line, and within the view of the driver of any approaching train or movement.

You are on or near the line if you are within 3 metres of the nearest rail, or on the line itself. You are not on or near the line if you on the other side of a fence or structure, even if it is less than 3 metres from the nearest rail.

You are also not on or near the line if you are crossing at a designated public crossing, however that only includes crossing the line, it doesnt include waiting there for a while to take photo's, in which case you are lineside, unless you are behind a barrier.
 

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I don't see you having a go at everyone who says they went linesiding.


BTW, what do you call it when you are LEGELLY doing it
 

bunnahabhain

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I dont call being on the legal side of the boundary fence anything, I call being on the illegal side of the boundary fence three things, On or near the line, Trackside, and Trespassing.

And this is the first time I've noticed this new word, 'linesiding', which to me, indicates that you were lineside, which is illegal unless you have a valid reason to be there.
 

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Jamie C. Steel said:
Linesiding does state that you were lineside, which means that you were between the railway boundary fence and the point that is called on or near the line, and within the view of the driver of any approaching train or movement.

Since when does 'Linesiding' mean that? I know of no official documentation which supports that definition. Jim has stated that he was the correct side of the boundary fence, which means he wasn't trespassing, regardless of what you think 'Linesiding' means.

Jamie C. Steel said:
You are on or near the line if you are within 3 metres of the nearest rail, or on the line itself. You are not on or near the line if you on the other side of a fence or structure, even if it is less than 3 metres from the nearest rail.

Please highlight the post in which Jim stated he was both within 3 metres of the nearest rail and on the incorrect side of the boundary fence.

Jamie C. Steel said:
You are also not on or near the line if you are crossing at a designated public crossing, however that only includes crossing the line, it doesnt include waiting there for a while to take photo's, in which case you are lineside, unless you are behind a barrier.

If a train was approaching, would you suggest that the photographer should cross anyway? Surely if they waited for the train to pass, they would be 'Linesiding' by your definition?

Jamie C. Steel said:
And this is the first time I've noticed this new word, 'linesiding', which to me, indicates that you were lineside, which is illegal unless you have a valid reason to be there.

If you have never come across the word 'Linesiding' before, you should investigate its meanings futher rather than purely guessing what people mean by it.
 

bunnahabhain

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He never said he was standing on the public side of the boundary fence. He said he was 'linesiding legally', now lineside means being within the boundary fence, in which case the only way of doing that legally is to have the authority to be there, and holding a valid PTS.
 

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Jamie C. Steel said:
...now lineside means being within the boundary fence...

You just said that you had never even heard the term 'Linesiding' until now, so what right do you have to apply that definition to it? It has no official definition, and yours is based purely on assumption.

Unless you are willing to accept that Jim was not acting illegally, which is/was clearly the case, then I shall lock this thread.
 

bunnahabhain

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I accept that he was acting legally, I didnt have much doubt that he wasnt, however I do object to the word 'Linesiding' being used, if this forum wants to be responsible for some member going out and getting him or herself killed, then carry on letting them use the word, otherwise it really should be banned, as it could lead to people trespassing on railways and putting both themselves, and others at risk.

I also have as much right to apply a defenition to 'Linesiding' as you, since it has no official meaning. So what right does anybody have to use a word without a defenition?
 
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