Grand Central 180 with green stripe

DanNCL

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I saw 180112 at Doncaster earlier today, with a green stripe in place of the usual orange stripe on one of the driving carriages. Anyone know why this is? I assume it’s some sort of climate related branding similar to that seen on DB’s ICE fleet but wondered if anyone here knew anything more about it?

I’ve attached a photo, sorry for the poor quality as it was taken from a distance.
C0DC3E66-D18D-4D19-8D13-5CA77F1DBEE9.jpeg
 
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hwl

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I saw 180112 at Doncaster earlier today, with a green stripe in place of the usual orange stripe on one of the driving carriages. Anyone know why this is? I assume it’s some sort of climate related branding similar to that seen on DB’s ICE fleet but wondered if anyone here knew anything more about it?

I’ve attached a photo, sorry for the poor quality as it was taken from a distance.
View attachment 103228
LNG conversion trial vehicle
 

Darandio

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Just found this from a couple of years back…..

(Sorry can’t get it to link properly)

I was just about to say something about the Google link because everyone would get differing results anyway. :lol:

There is a document here about it.
 

plugwash

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As a stored liquid in a tank it is neither flammable nor ignitable.
However "Natural Gas" (methane) unlike "Petroleum gas" (propane/butane) can't reasonably be kept liquid by pressure alone. Afaict a LNG vessel would need to be cryogenic and would either need to have an active cooling system, or some kind of venting/flaring system (or potentially both) to avoid pressure building up over time when no fuel is being drawn off.

It would be interesting to hear how they plan to manage this in a manner that satisfies the railways safety folks.

It must be mixed with air in very specific proportions
A quick search says 5.3% to 14%.
 

TRAX

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It’s a pity they haven’t pushed it further to use a 100 % gas engine. It would’ve highlighted the benefits even more, and there are quite a few CNG and LNG engines able to be used in a railway application like this one.
 

Bayum

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It just looks a mess Might as well add a decal rather than a massive green strip that makes it look mint flavoured.
 

Towers

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It’s a pity they haven’t pushed it further to use a 100 % gas engine. It would’ve highlighted the benefits even more, and there are quite a few CNG and LNG engines able to be used in a railway application like this one.
They tend to require enormous fuel tanks though, don't they? Certainly in bus fleets they do!
 

Darandio

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It seems like the G-volution technology mixes diesel and LNG in a ratio suited to that particular engine and not a case of using LNG only. Presumably the amount of LNG used in this trial is relatively small to demonstrate the technology.
 

TRAX

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Is it possible to run a diesel engine on LNG?
Normally gas engines require spark plugs as petrol engines do.

But here, as the Diesel will, as usual, self-combust, it will make the gas go bang as well.
 

Bletchleyite

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Presumably the benefit, as LNG is a fossil fuel, is cleaner combustion, i.e. reduced particulates?

What is the safety implication compared with diesel of the tank being breached? I'm thinking of the old gas lighting fires.
 

hexagon789

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Is it possible to run a diesel engine on LNG?
I don't think on pure LNG, but I think mixtures with diesel are possible.

Presumably the benefit, as LNG is a fossil fuel, is cleaner combustion, i.e. reduced particulates?

What is the safety implication compared with diesel of the tank being breached? I'm thinking of the old gas lighting fires.
Much cleaner burning.

If it mixes with air in the correct proportions.
 

TRAX

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I don't think on pure LNG, but I think mixtures with diesel are possible.
Normally gas engines require spark plugs as petrol engines do.

But here, as the Diesel will, as usual, self-combust, it will make the gas go bang as well.

;)

What is the safety implication compared with diesel of the tank being breached? I'm thinking of the old gas lighting fires.

CNG and LNG tanks are extremely safe and regulated, now. They even have a limited lifespan.
Long gone are the days of the unsafe gas, which has usually been associated with LPG.
 

sharpley

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Slightly off topic but another GC 180, 180108 'William Shakespeare', has just arrived at Old Dalby...

Presumably it's here for some sort of testing, any idea what though?
 

800001

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Slightly off topic but another GC 180, 180108 'William Shakespeare', has just arrived at Old Dalby...

Presumably it's here for some sort of testing, any idea what though?
They were meant to be there for European Cab signalling testing.
 

James90012

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They are the last operator regularly on diesel power into King's Cross now so there is and will be increasing pressure on them to find a more sustainable solution. Will be interesting to know how much this reduces CO2 emissions by.
 

norbitonflyer

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It’s a pity they haven’t pushed it further to use a 100 % gas engine. It would’ve highlighted the benefits even more, and there are quite a few CNG and LNG engines able to be used in a railway application like this one.
Presumably that would require a new engine - one with spark plugs - whereas this mixture probably only requires modifying the fuel injection system.

Is that more flammable than diesel?! o_O:lol:
It is surely a basic requirement of a fuel that it will burn.
 

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