If you fell out of love with the rail scene in the past, what got you back?

Discussion in 'Railway History & Nostalgia' started by 47403, 15 Apr 2015.

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  1. 47403

    47403 Established Member

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    I'm sure a lot of the more experienced Rail Enthusiast must've went through this at some point, be it the change over from steam to diesel or like me, a mix of finding new distractions, women, beer and work,plus loco hauled stuff, being replaced by units and HST's, killed the novelty factor.
    After a decade of not even looking at a loco, i was asked would I walk the dog whilst my grand parents were on holiday, as you do, I said yeah no hassle, one glorious day I set off with Butch and we walked to a small wooded area, where we'd walk along the public footpath, where I could let him off to run and forlornly chase and fail to catch a rabbit, this wood is right beside the ECML and Tyne Yard, a place as a kid, I'd spent many a happy time on the footbridge watching trains come and go, quite simply it was a mecca till my late teens.
    This day I ignored it totally, I just cut over the field and continued onto the public footpath into the woods and out the other side, as you come out, the other side of the wood, the foot path basically is at the foot of the embankment of the ECML to the left there's a huge sloping field, which we called Hay fever hill, as kids, basically because the Oil Seed Rape flowers, would be murder, on the hot summer days. Nowadays Hay Fever hill is dominated by Angel of the North.
    Anyway I digress, Im walking along the footpath by the embankment, I heard the screeching of brakes, I looked up and saw, the weirdest looking loco, in a blue livery, dragging huge blue coal hoppers, I was thinking what the hells this, turned out be N Power liveried 59201, that loco got me intrigued again but not back into it. I DO openly admit, that Butch's walks, were ever increasingly accompanied by a small notebook and pen but I just took the freight locos, predominately the Class 60's and the red and yellow plague, better known as the class 66's and ignored the rest.
    However a few months later, I walked onto Central Station just to have a look to see if there was anything remotely interesting to look at, for old times sake perhaps and was greeted by 47805, pulling in, I asked a guy, wheres this come from and was told, Bristol Temple Meads, it'll be going back to Birmingham later, I needed no 2nd invitation, I whizzed over the bridge and bought a return to Darlington, it was the most blissful 30mins, I'd had in a long time on the railway, however I still wasn't truly back, yeah I went out and rode the 47's, when work permitted and I thoroughly enjoyed that odd night out on the rails but all these new loco's and I didn't have a book to underline them, so I bought a platform 5 loco book, to my dismay a lot of what I had, had either disappeared at the hands of the cutters torch or been re-numbered, it was heartbreaking seeing great swathes of loco's had gone, the 08's, 20's, 26's, 27's 31's, 33's 37's, 47's and 50's seemed to bear the brunt of it.' 56's and 58's in France, some 37's also resided in Spain. Bizzare.
    All of a sudden I was hooked again, I done an overnighter in Carlisle, found myself marveling at the DRS fleet of classic traction but I still just wrote loco's down, basically because that was the only book I had up to date.
    A year or so later, on a trip to Crewe, I treated myself to Platform 5's 2010 combined book and after I'd completed the chore of marking up the whole wack, I found I was hooked again. So much so I repeated that very same chore 4 yrs later, albeit with the cheaper NREA book, when I found my book was now too far gone, it was a joke to call it outdated:oops::oops:
    I'll be honest, I'm still a nostalgic fool, I still love 47's, hate peaks and even so there's great swathes of GM loco's (in various guises and train operators) on the majority of freight workings, new D and EMU's everywhere, the addition of 70's and brand new 68's too,(which I have to admit, I'm a fan of too) has added a fair bit more variety of late to the hobby. Fortunately some operators still use classic traction, Im glad to see a 50yr old loco still riding loud n proud on the mainline, earning its keep. Just a shame theyre not working summer Saturday trains from Yarmouth, Skegness or Scarborough, other than on Rail Tours.
     
    Last edited: 15 Apr 2015
  2. DiscoStu

    DiscoStu Member

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    I fell out of love with railways back in 1997 and I've never got it back - I haven't done anything remotely enthusiast like since then. I only come on here to reminisce and to see what's going on these days.

    In my eyes, it's a case of no diesel or electric loco hauled trains ... no point.

    I still enjoy train travel, but for the journey rather than the train itself. I love looking at old photos and reading bashing stories though.
     
  3. LowLevel

    LowLevel Established Member

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    I've not managed to fall out of love with it yet. In the same vein as what you've asked, seeing a signal gantry in the dark, colourlight or semaphore, always does it for me - my time might come if there's no little red, yellow and green lights shining away any more.

    That and every time I see a small child with a parent waving at the trains in the sunshine, not necessarily even riding on them, just enjoying being around, it takes me back a couple of decades and reminds me of how I was and to an extent how I still am - I just love being around railways, it's far more than just the trains - if anything can be said to be 'in my blood' as it were, it's the railway.

    I'm very lucky I managed to become a railwayman, touch wood, without spoiling my hobby for myself.
     
  4. 47403

    47403 Established Member

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    fantastic, that's excellent to read and so true, it's in the blood.. Stu, like you I felt the same, whats the point but that's your choice bud, who am I to preach to you. I got back into it because I realised, it's just what I like doing, travelling this country, meeting like minded souls and lo and behold, there's a small increase in loco hauled services, next month for instance, the Cumbrian coast will have loco hauled services on:D:D:D:D, classic traction too, DRS loco's. Chiltern's using the 68's and 67's, 67's on the WAG, not to mention the fife circle turn, 67's being replaced by 68's.. Gives this nostalgic fool a bit more excitement on the railway front at least.
     
    Last edited: 15 Apr 2015
  5. Techniquest

    Techniquest Veteran Member

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    I'd love to sit here and go into detail over how I fell out of love with the railway for 2.5 months at the end of 2013, but to be honest that would be too much! Let's just say I had my eye on a woman and wanted to give it a go at being normal!

    Really I suppose I never 100% lost the interest, as I was still on here at the time, just not much. Thankfully I saw sense eventually, I'm not a 'norm' and never will be, and I found myself more and more excited about going back to the railway. Never looked back!

    Being normal, ugh what a horribly boring time!
     
  6. scarby

    scarby Member

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    I'm afraid I agree.

    As an enthusiast I'm afraid the fun has been sucked out of the railways.

    When I grew up the railways were one big playground. I don't mean that I trespassed on the tracks, but there was so much to discover - old platforms and stock lying around, and yes, I did wander down the goods yard and no-one said anything. I also cabbed loads of locos.

    You could turn up 40 minutes before your train went and get on board, get the best seats.

    Now if you try to travel second class there are hoardes of people crammed around the doors with piles of luggage competing for a seat. In the old days the bashers pretty much had rights to the whole front coach!

    I am very pleased that old locos survive but no way am I going to travel 6 hours on the off chance of finding a class 47.

    How I did re-love the rail scene though is heritage. I can ride a DMU or behind a diesel on a good quiet day on a heritage line and it's like the old days. Thanks you NYMR and KWVR for that.
     
  7. Morpethcurve

    Morpethcurve Member

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    Got interested in 1970, age 9, when we moved to a house overlooking the Morpeth curve. Dad got me the Ian Allan numbers book and I was hooked. Predictably Deltics were my favourite, The flat terrain allowed one to hear them a few miles away, they'd throttle back to decelerate for the curve (50 mph in those days) then floor it again.

    Only lived there a year, Dad got a job in Singapore. It was the southern outpost of meter gauge Malaysian Railways and there were half a dozen passenger trains a day plus a few freights. However, the airport was far more exciting and I defected to plane-spotting.

    Wish I'd paid some attention to rail out there. Steam locos were still in use up to approx. 1973, I saw numerous, and rode behind one for about 7 hours in Malaysia, with our car on a truck. Also MR had EE built diesels, about 1300 HP IIRC, dark green with a Deltic-shaped nose with headlight like the prototype, and maroon Japanese locos which reminded me of a small Class 47 (there's apparently one of these at the museum in Kuala Lumpur and there are some other preserved locos in the country. There is a society of rail enthusiasts in Malaysia with some interesting photos on their website. Forget the name of the organisation, sorry...) MR also had orange EE built shunters, a bit like a Class 08.

    But aviation had taken over. Looking back I neglected rail almost completely. For a couple of weeks I changed trains frequently at Slough, reading a mag or picking my nose whilst numerous expresses went by and I waited my DMU to Bourne End. I can't even remember whether they were 50s, Westerns or whatever. Pathetic.

    However, in 2007 I found myself near Pickering visiting Parents who'd hired a cottage. Looking for stuff to do, thought I'd amble over to the NYMR. Shocked to find there were two Deltics in residence at the time. I hadn't given much thought to them over the last few decades and was stunned, amazed and drenched with nostalgia. I had no idea any were preserved (except the prototype, which I did know about).

    Neither was operating that day, but I spent a lot of time just gazing at them both. Found out about the Deltic Pres. Soc. and dropped in at Barrow Hill on the way back south. Couldn't believe my luck, RSG was out the back, hooked up to the load bank, throttling up and down. Many will appreciate how the sound is one of the defining features of a Deltic.

    It all came flooding back to me. I just stood there and soaked it up for ages. I hadn't heard the drone for decades yet it was so familiar to me. Hadn't realised what a mark it had left in my subconscious.

    Anyway, Of course I'm a lifetime DPS member, go to heritage railways when I can, especially if Deltics are there, thoroughly enjoyed the Great Gathering at the NRM, and take more interest in the rail scene.

    Like other posters, I rue the lack of loco-hauled trains, and find it fascinating that locos from the '60s are still at work out there. I have no interest in EMUs or DMUs although I do confess to liking HSTs, which have my respect because they are such a resilient long-lived design, look pretty good, and on Grand Central at least, they are so much nicer to ride than the 180s. Even post-Valenta, they sound good from on board, whereas the 180s are crowded (hardly any table/club seating) and with an engine under each carriage they are basically a glorified DMU in my view.

    One change over the last few years - I read more rail magazines than aviation!

    So that's my story. I'm an airline pilot now, and on down-route stopovers I'm as likely to look for rail museums as air museums, or just hang around in stations watching traffic. I don't spot though!

    Regards - Morpethcurve
     
  8. 455driver

    455driver Veteran Member

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    I joined this forum and saw the love and respect all the members have for the railways and railstaff! :lol:
     
  9. IanD

    IanD Established Member

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    :D

    It was the friendliness of rail staff that won me back.

    And cheap Advances - couldn't afford to travel once my railcard ran out until cheap Advances. Neil Williams can keep his ideas to himself otherwise I'll be travelling a lot less in future :D
     
  10. RichmondCommu

    RichmondCommu Established Member

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    In terms of being an active rail enthusiast that pretty much finished when I went to university at the age of 18 (1984). Although I went Inter Railing over the course of the next three summers I really no longer had any interest in the trains themselves.

    After our twins were born (they are now 21) we starting taking them to preserved railways with my dad, mainly because they both loved Thomas The Tank Engine and because it was something that they could enjoy with their Grandfather who has always loved trains :)

    My renewed interest in railways as an enthusiast came about when my wife bought me a copy of the Bakers Atlas for Christmas in 2009, along with a subscription to Railway Magazine. This was all a complete surprise but I'm very glad that she did! Whilst I don't collect numbers and rarely photograph anything other than steam locos I do now take a keen interest on what happens on our network along with the odd day out on the network.

    Nowadays trips to the SVR and other preserved railways are enjoyed with three generations of my family :) And as a bonus my two nephews also love trains and have really got into the Peter's Railway series of books!
     
  11. richw

    richw Established Member

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    I lost interest probably about age 13/14 as it wasn't "cool". I got back into it when I had my first daughter in my early to mid 20s as worrying about what was "cool" no longer mattered when I had a child and had settled down etc.
    In fact my join date of this forum was 26 days before my eldest daughter was born.
     
  12. RichmondCommu

    RichmondCommu Established Member

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    Have you managed to get your little girl into Thomas The Tank Engine or is she into the likes of Peppa Pig? Amazingly both my daughters (and their brother) loved Thomas when they were little even though I'd long stopped being a railway enthusiast.
     
  13. richw

    richw Established Member

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    Last Saturday my wife was out all day. I asked her what she wanted to do, her answer was she wanted to go on trains, buses and a burger for lunch.

    We went and got a ride Cornwall ticket and did a couple of trains and a couple of buses, stopping at wetherspoons for lunch.
    Making the most of it with her still being under 5 for 2 more months!
     
  14. RichmondCommu

    RichmondCommu Established Member

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    I know what you mean! Children are not cheap but they are fantastic entertainment!
     
  15. richw

    richw Established Member

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    They seem to be even more expensive these days, attractions dictate price by height not age, probably due to the number of children that used to remain a certain age that got them in free or much cheaper for several years!
    This has worked both ways for me, my eldest, who will be 5 in July is really tall for her age. My other is 3 and she is really short for her age.

    Once I have to start paying for their rail or bus fares it will suddenly make the car the cheaper option. We use the public transport as it's cheaper than the car when the girls go free, but that won't be the case once they get to 5.

    As for entertainment, the things they say has me in laughter. Mrs Richw is pregnant with our third and both girls have decided that mummy ate loads of tiny baby body parts for it to get in her stomach.
     
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