metropolitan line confusion

Status
Not open for further replies.

thedailygraft

New Member
Joined
27 Apr 2016
Messages
3
Hello,
Any users of the metro line help me with my confusion?
I want to travel from Kings Cross (KX) to Chesham in the morning. The TFL website lists a 06.42 tube arriving at 07.46 (too early), but then the next tube to Chesham isn't until 08.45 arriving at 09.49 (too late).

However there are baker street tubes to Chesham inbetween those times, and baker street is on the same line? I understand that further down the metropolitan line it forks to different destinations so not all metro tubes go to Chesham. But there are no forks in the line before Harrow, so how come I can get multiple tubes from baker street, but only a choice of two tubes direct from KX? Do I have to accept that I can get a tube from KX to Baker St and then change to a Metro line to Chesham, or am I missing something?

Thanks in advance :)
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

Peter Mugridge

Veteran Member
Joined
8 Apr 2010
Messages
11,798
Location
Epsom
Yes, Baker Street is on the same line; some trains terminate and start there, others run through. It's a very easy change of train to make.

Just find the one you need based on the time you need to be at Chesham then just make sure you arrive at Baker Street 10 - 15 minutes ahead of that train departing.

Any northbound Metropolitan train from King's Cross will do as your connection and allow 10 minutes for the journey to Baker Street. You can also get any Hammersmith bound train from King's Cross to Baker Street, but you'll have a longer walk to change platforms at Baker Street if you do that.
 
Last edited:

thedailygraft

New Member
Joined
27 Apr 2016
Messages
3
Yes, Baker Street is on the same line; some trains terminate and start there, others run through. It's a very easy change of train to make.

Just find the one you need based on the time you need to be at Chesham then just make sure you arrive at Baker Street 10 - 15 minutes ahead of that train departing.

Any northbound Metropolitan train from King's Cross will do as your connection and allow 10 minutes for the journey to Baker Street. You can also get any Hammersmith bound train from King's Cross to Baker Street, but you'll have a longer walk to change platforms at Baker Street if you do that.

Thanks Peter,
It just seemed odd to get a Metro line from Kings Cross to Baker. Then get off and get another Metro line from Baker to Chesham?

So I am guessing that some of the KX to baker tubes fork off to different destinations, but some Chesham tubes originate in Bakers Street?
 

Peter Mugridge

Veteran Member
Joined
8 Apr 2010
Messages
11,798
Location
Epsom
It's more to do with there not being the capacity east of Baker Street to handle all the Metropolitan trains; even off peak half of them terminate at Baker Street.

When you make your journey, you will easily see why this is the case.


East of Baker Street, the track is shared with the Hammersmith and City / Circle Lines - these are the ones that continue to Hammersmith, they basically go straight ahead at Baker Street while the Met Line turns right there. It's a flat junction as well so if you're on the left side of a Met train you can briefly see straight down the Hammersmith side of the station just before you get into the platform at Baker Street.
 
Last edited:

edwin_m

Veteran Member
Joined
21 Apr 2013
Messages
20,923
Location
Nottingham
The train will start from one of the bays that are either side of the Metropolitan through tracks at Baker Street. So if you arrive at Baker Street on a Metropolitan from Kings Cross your Chesham train may just be across the platform or you may have to go up or down (IIRC there is a bridge one end of the platform and a subway further along). If you get a Hammersmith or Circle train to Baker Street you will always have to go up to cross the tracks. It's quite a complicated station so do make sure you leave enough time.
 

Quakkerillo

Member
Joined
23 Jan 2015
Messages
543
Have a look at this website with the layout. http://carto.metro.free.fr/cartes/metro-london/

You can see at Baker street that platforms 1 and 4 are terminus for Metropolitan trains coming in from the Northwest, whereas platforms 2 and 3 are through platforms.
Due to capacity constraints, not all trains can just continue, so some trains will terminate here, and then head up back North.
 

yorkie

Forum Staff
Staff Member
Administrator
Joined
6 Jun 2005
Messages
53,206
Location
Yorkshire
Thanks Peter,
It just seemed odd to get a Metro line from Kings Cross to Baker. Then get off and get another Metro line from Baker to Chesham?

So I am guessing that some of the KX to baker tubes fork off to different destinations, but some Chesham tubes originate in Bakers Street?
The Metropolitan Railway is a proper and full size railway!

It was built before the first tube trains were invented. It just happened to become part of London Underground, due to the history of the various lines. It's not actually tube line at all, but anything operated by LU has subsequently colloquially become known as 'the tube'. But it's not really anything like the deep level tube lines at all, as you've discovered (and will see more evidence of when you make the journey).

Anyway, with a train every few minutes heading Northwest out of Baker Street, the only way you'd be able to fit them all through the cut & cover tunnels to Aldgate would be to abolish or reduce frequency on the other routes that it shares the Baker Street to Aldgate section with.
 

Rup

Member
Joined
27 Nov 2015
Messages
64
Location
Wiltshire
I find Google Maps very helpful for planning rail journeys. In Google Maps, this particular journey says to change trains at Baker Street (as you suggested).
 

Mikey C

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2013
Messages
4,253
It might be too late, but it would be best for you to take the first Met line train, then change at Finchley Road (the first station after Baker Street) as that way you can stay on the same platform, rather than possibly having to cross over the strairs
 

MrB

Member
Joined
3 Jan 2016
Messages
323
Location
Tunbridge Wells
I find Google Maps very helpful for planning rail journeys. In Google Maps, this particular journey says to change trains at Baker Street (as you suggested).

Indeed it is, and the ability to search for a journey by both arrival and departure time is useful too.
 

PeterC

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2014
Messages
3,094
When there are problems on the line the Chesham and Amersham services may be cut back to Harrow or Wembley Park and reverse at Wembley depot. In the absence of a through service I would always take the first train to Harrow which, for Ricky, Chalfont and Amersham also gives the option of a Chiltern train.
 

MrB

Member
Joined
3 Jan 2016
Messages
323
Location
Tunbridge Wells
When there are problems on the line the Chesham and Amersham services may be cut back to Harrow or Wembley Park and reverse at Wembley depot. In the absence of a through service I would always take the first train to Harrow which, for Ricky, Chalfont and Amersham also gives the option of a Chiltern train.

Would a ticket need to be bought or could the OP use oyster on Chiltern services?
 

Simon11

Member
Joined
7 Nov 2010
Messages
1,090
You can use Oyster on Chiltern services within the PAYG area (so not beyond Amersham).
 

pitdiver

Member
Joined
22 Jan 2012
Messages
801
The Metropolitan Railway is a proper and full size railway!

It was built before the first tube trains were invented. It just happened to become part of London Underground, due to the history of the various lines. It's not actually tube line at all, but anything operated by LU has subsequently colloquially become known as 'the tube'. But it's not really anything like the deep level tube lines at all, as you've discovered (and will see more evidence of when you make the journey).

Anyway, with a train every few minutes heading Northwest out of Baker Street, the only way you'd be able to fit them all through the cut & cover tunnels to Aldgate would be to abolish or reduce frequency on the other routes that it shares the Baker Street to Aldgate section with.

Dave, I like " The Cut of Your Jib", You are quite right. The "Met" is a proper railway. As an ex "Met" employee I fully agree!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top