Network Rail Operative - (Signalling Maintenance)

Discussion in 'Railway Jobs & Careers' started by Xlztt, 10 Aug 2015.

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  1. Xlztt

    Xlztt Member

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    Hi Folks,

    I'm currently considering applying for the above and I'm beginning to research the role. It would be good to hear what the job is actually like from persons who have been or are currently in that role.

    Through a previous career, I'm well used to hard graft and being exposed to all the outdoor elements.

    Is there scope for progression into other roles and what are Network Rail like as an employer?

    Id be taking a significant pay cut, so I don't want to change career to something that won't lead anywhere.

    I'm also currently on a reserve list for a Trainee Train Driver role with a TOC having passed the 1st stage assessments and DMI, but due to there being no vacancies I'm unable to progress to the stage 2 assessments.

    We're I to be successful, would it be detrimental to the Train Driver route?

    Many thanks.
     
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  3. ragh5018

    ragh5018 Member

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    Hi Signalling is a good department, but hard work is required in maintenance because u are involving in a safety critical role u need to maintain the equipment from electronic to mechanical. But signalling is having a good future and you will be well paid if u acquire good knowledge. Network rail is going into a transition to new level of signalling systems at present. It is having a good scope u can develop as a signal maintenance engineer incoming years
     
  4. alxndr

    alxndr Member

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    If you want to progress you need to be hot on the technical side of things just as much as being willing to put the graft in. There is a lot of knowledge required in S&T and you need to be willing to learn this, and also have the experience to go along with it to go far in my eyes. There are the types that are plenty willing but don't have the brains and these tend not to progress past operative level.

    A lot of places if you're wanting to go up the ladder of operative, technician, team leader it can be waiting for someone to die before you get a chance, but there are other routes you can take if you've the mind for it.

    I believe if you're just looking at it because it's the railway it might not be enough to keep you happy, you'll need some engineering interest too. That said I find it's generally pretty rewarding and I can't imagine doing anything else. Some days where it's just basic maintenance can be a tad repetitive, but getting to the bottom of and fixing a fault is incredibly satisfying.
     
  5. Bodiddly

    Bodiddly Member

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    If your thing is rubbish hours, standing around in bad weather and working under pressure from management then S&T is your goal. Because of the shift work the poor yearly salary used to be enhanced by a shift allowance (37.5% if I remember correctly). I don't know if this is still the case or if it has just been included in the salary.
    On the plus side, NR are one of the better employers and it should be a pretty safe career with a very limited promotional ladder within the S&T but access to internel vacancies that could take you to management another way if you have half a brain.
    I would try and find out where you stand with the TOC before committing.
     
  6. mo1905

    mo1905 New Member

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    I have applied for a signaller position and passed initial sift and on-line assessment. I am a T1 diabetic using insulin, will this prohibit employment ? I have checked application and medical requirements don't specifically mention diabetes. Thanks.
     
  7. TomBoyd

    TomBoyd Member

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    Call HR and check
     
  8. mo1905

    mo1905 New Member

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    Thanks Tom but was hoping somebody here may know first. I don't want to call and ruin my chances. If somebody here is or knows of a signaller who is diabetic it certainly helps my case.
     
  9. alxndr

    alxndr Member

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    You'd probably be more likely to get a response by making a thread of your own with the relevant titles.

    Or you could call without giving your name if you're concerned about it damaging your chances, but at the end of the day if it's an issue it'll be an issue whether they find out through you calling or in the medical, and if it's fine then your mind will be put at rest.
     
  10. JohnFM

    JohnFM Member

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    Damaging your chances? If being Insulin Dependant Diabetic means that you're unfit, you're unfit! It is that simple. No "damaging chances" to be had.

    You need to ring the company to check.

    Would you rather know you're unfit before you start?
     
  11. Longforgan

    Longforgan Member

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    While there are some signallers with diabetes, they are monitored by BUPA and as soon as they develop the need to inject insulin then it is game over. I've seen it happen to colleagues twice in the past and another is currently stood down and is not expected to return. Injecting insulin is incompatible with the safety critical role of signaller.

    I'm sorry if this is not the postive answer you'd hoped for.
     
  12. Sanatogen

    Sanatogen Member

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    I know signallers who use insulin without issue.

    You can't work alone but a multi person box should be fine.
     
    Last edited: 24 Aug 2015
  13. Longforgan

    Longforgan Member

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    I must admit I only considered single manned locations but then I work in an area where the nearest multi-manned box is over 60 miles away. Nonetheless I have lost 2 colleagues to diabetes in 11 years.
     
  14. JohnFM

    JohnFM Member

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    Usually that is for those diagnosed after you've started the job.

    It can be a bar to safety critical roles in the initial stages of recruitment.
     
  15. 33056

    33056 Established Member

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    Shouldn't this thread be split? We appear to be discussing signallers and signalling technicians which are two rather different occupations!
     
  16. waterlooroader

    waterlooroader Member

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    I was under the impression that insulin dependant diabetics (Type 1) were barred from working in any safety critical job where lone working is required (Therefore a single manned signal box would be out of bounds)

    However any job where the applicant is accompanied (Such as a signaller job in a PSB) is open to Type 1 diabetics, provided that they meet all the other medical standards (Eyesight, blood pressure, weight etc.)
     
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