New Railcard for Veterans...............

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35B

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Leisure travel should be paid with wages, that's what they are for.
it’s perfectly reasonable for an employer to provide non wage perks to employees. It’s less reasonable to expect that an employer should provide such perks when it has to pay in full for them. And as, where Network Rail are concerned, the perks in question would be provided by their customers, that suggests they are making a reasonable decision.
 

SJDCornwall

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I am very sorry to read that some of you on this forum feel the way you do about service veterans and this railcard. Please remember that everyone of us who has served has signed a blank cheque including our very lives so that the rest of you may go about your civilian lives in a normal manner (covid withstanding). I served for 25 years in the Royal Navy and finished up with osteo arthritus which meant I was medically discharged from service and have since had to have a new hip at the young age of 53. I now have issues from time to time with pains which mean long distance driving for me is not always good. I have served with lads who still suffer badly from PTSD and other issues from the falklands war of 1982. Are you all that mean that you feel that that our service to Queen and country means that little to you? I for one am looking forward to having my veterans ID card and will be using it as much as possible when the Covid situation calms down. Si Dungey Royal Navy retired and proud of my service.
 

AlbertBeale

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I am very sorry to read that some of you on this forum feel the way you do about service veterans and this railcard. Please remember that everyone of us who has served has signed a blank cheque including our very lives so that the rest of you may go about your civilian lives in a normal manner (covid withstanding). I served for 25 years in the Royal Navy and finished up with osteo arthritus which meant I was medically discharged from service and have since had to have a new hip at the young age of 53. I now have issues from time to time with pains which mean long distance driving for me is not always good. I have served with lads who still suffer badly from PTSD and other issues from the falklands war of 1982. Are you all that mean that you feel that that our service to Queen and country means that little to you? I for one am looking forward to having my veterans ID card and will be using it as much as possible when the Covid situation calms down. Si Dungey Royal Navy retired and proud of my service.
There are lots of people in lots of job categories who "serve the country/community" and who take risks to do so. I see no reason to single out people from the armed forces for special support. It would be nice if anyone in need because of health/disability problems got all the help they needed, including with transport, as a matter of course in a civilised society, with no special pleading needed. (I'll avoid discussing, in this context, whether the existence of armed forces is compatible with a civilised society.)
 

35B

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I am very sorry to read that some of you on this forum feel the way you do about service veterans and this railcard. Please remember that everyone of us who has served has signed a blank cheque including our very lives so that the rest of you may go about your civilian lives in a normal manner (covid withstanding). I served for 25 years in the Royal Navy and finished up with osteo arthritus which meant I was medically discharged from service and have since had to have a new hip at the young age of 53. I now have issues from time to time with pains which mean long distance driving for me is not always good. I have served with lads who still suffer badly from PTSD and other issues from the falklands war of 1982. Are you all that mean that you feel that that our service to Queen and country means that little to you? I for one am looking forward to having my veterans ID card and will be using it as much as possible when the Covid situation calms down. Si Dungey Royal Navy retired and proud of my service.
I do not begrudge veterans recognition for their service, and that includes this railcard, though I do question the policy imperative behind the creation of the railcard - and especially whether it really addresses the needs of veterans, or is just a political device to look good. More widely, I have every respect for those who suffer as a result of their service, like those you mention with PTSD, and agree they deserve support. But ultimately, I'm with those who ask why veterans should qualify for special benefits purely because of who their former employer is.

A civilian, son of a retired policeman and with a godfather who served in the army up to retirement.
 

yorkie

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Will the vast majority of eligible persons not already qualify for Senior Railcard?
This 2012 article suggests most retire long before age 60:
Only 2% of Service personnel serve a full career through to age 55....
 

DarloRich

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Not going to begrudge veterans their discount. I would like the same for railway staff mind................

( I also worry about the fetishisation of veterans and "service" we seem to have developed aping the USA but that is a separate argument. Is a soldiers service more valuable or laudable than that of a nurse or a policeman or a fireman or even bin man?)
 
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WesternLancer

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I am very sorry to read that some of you on this forum feel the way you do about service veterans and this railcard. Please remember that everyone of us who has served has signed a blank cheque including our very lives so that the rest of you may go about your civilian lives in a normal manner (covid withstanding). I served for 25 years in the Royal Navy and finished up with osteo arthritus which meant I was medically discharged from service and have since had to have a new hip at the young age of 53. I now have issues from time to time with pains which mean long distance driving for me is not always good. I have served with lads who still suffer badly from PTSD and other issues from the falklands war of 1982. Are you all that mean that you feel that that our service to Queen and country means that little to you? I for one am looking forward to having my veterans ID card and will be using it as much as possible when the Covid situation calms down. Si Dungey Royal Navy retired and proud of my service.
I do agree with this as it happens, but it's a strange approach to policy making really, and hard to conclude that it's nothing more than making the govt 'look good'. But good luck to anyone who can get one.

If it was part of a balanced policy approach then veterans ought to also be able to get, say a discount on car road license disc, or discounted bus fares, or if you take the policy further - why not discount on food at the shops for example.
 

Ralph Ayres

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It's a wonder I don't qualify having being in the cadets at school! :lol:
no as to get the veterans railcard, you only have to have served ONE day yes ONE day in her majesty's armed forces(regular or reserve) etc
...and have "seen duty on legally defined military operations" which makes it rather more stringent than just signing up and walking out after the first day.
 

35B

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I do agree with this as it happens, but it's a strange approach to policy making really, and hard to conclude that it's nothing more than making the govt 'look good'. But good luck to anyone who can get one.

If it was part of a balanced policy approach then veterans ought to also be able to get, say a discount on car road license disc, or discounted bus fares, or if you take the policy further - why not discount on food at the shops for example.
I'd disagree; it treats veterans as needing mollycoddling and commits governments to a long term bill that is completely independent of need. If governments need to show their support for military veterans, then let's see that through real investment in supporting servicemen and women when they leave the forces, and in looking after them properly where they suffer consequences from serving. This is just a sticking plaster gesture, a nice to have that makes the government look like it's supporting veterans, but without engaging with the hard stuff that actually matters.
 

WesternLancer

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I'd disagree; it treats veterans as needing mollycoddling and commits governments to a long term bill that is completely independent of need. If governments need to show their support for military veterans, then let's see that through real investment in supporting servicemen and women when they leave the forces, and in looking after them properly where they suffer consequences from serving. This is just a sticking plaster gesture, a nice to have that makes the government look like it's supporting veterans, but without engaging with the hard stuff that actually matters.
Yes, I agree with the thrust of your point, tho there are lots of policy areas where part of your point is the case (provision of a service or benefit independent of financial need) - NHS is a good start some may argue....
 
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Haywain

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...and have "seen duty on legally defined military operations" which makes it rather more stringent than just signing up and walking out after the first day.
The part you have chosen to selectively quote refers specifically to former members of the merchant marine, not former members of the armed services. So, actually, not as stringent as you think.
 

theironroad

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I think the one day thing is a legal technicality more than anything.

Iirc, to join the British Legion as a ful lmember, also has the same one day requirement.

In reality, I doubt there is any one person who has only served one day unless their joining date and discharge date were the same day.....:)
 

Vespa

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I have been informed that a Veterans Railcard is being introduced as of 1st October. £30 a year with a £9 discount for the 1st year available until the end of March. Not sure how we will have to prove we are Veterans.
Your service number should do it, preferably on an MOD headed letter, when you join up you get given a service number so kit can be issued to you and pay, when your number is entered on an MOD computer all your service record and kit issues will be shown, medals awarded and your disciplinary records too unless you have some undiscovered crime which is best not to disclose to keep your LSGC :)
 

Haywain

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I have been informed that a Veterans Railcard is being introduced as of 1st October. £30 a year with a £9 discount for the 1st year available until the end of March. Not sure how we will have to prove we are Veterans.
On sale today, full details on the website which is the only place you can buy one.
 

AlbertBeale

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...and have "seen duty on legally defined military operations" which makes it rather more stringent than just signing up and walking out after the first day.
"Walking our after the first day" makes the military sound like a job where you have a right to hand in your notice. In fact, the British military have been described as the last relic of medieval bondage; it's a totally one-sided contract. Once you've gone thought an initial phase, there's actually only one route to an automatic (allegedly) right to leave, namely if you develop a conscientious objection to the military. However, recruits aren't told about this (and indeed many of the senior ranks know nothing of the provisions). And even if you are lucky enough to discover the legal right, and try to exercise it, you can - in cases I've seen - be turned down and badly treated.

Yes, I agree with the thrust of your point, tho there are lots of policy areas where part of your point is the case (provision of a service or benefit independent of need) - NHS is a good start some may argue....
Are you saying that the NHS provides a service independent of need - surely not! It precisely provides a service according to need - though independent of means. Which combination seems to me to be efficient, progressive, and civioised. (Apologies if I've misunderstood the point you were making.)
 

WesternLancer

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[QUOTE="AlbertBeale, post: 4823038, member: 70479
Are you saying that the NHS provides a service independent of need - surely not! It precisely provides a service according to need - though independent of means. Which combination seems to me to be efficient, progressive, and civioised. (Apologies if I've misunderstood the point you were making.)
[/QUOTE]

sorry, I should have said 'independent of financial need' - ie need to be otherwise unable to afford the healthcare - as I was responding to a point that was saying that govt should ensure " then let's see that through real investment in supporting servicemen and women when they leave the forces, and in looking after them properly where they suffer consequences from serving. " - which I note does not necessarily mean (just) money but in our society much support relates to to allow people to access the goods and services that they need - in this case travel I suppose, tho that poster may have meant a wide range of other support. Of course I do accept the NHS services are allocated by medical need (or what its gatekeepers decide is medical need in some cases, not always the same thing but that's another topic!).
 

Ralph Ayres

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The part you have chosen to selectively quote refers specifically to former members of the merchant marine, not former members of the armed services. So, actually, not as stringent as you think.
Fair point. I was quoting from https://www.veterans-railcard.co.uk/are-you-eligible/, which despite being more detailed than the front page manages to add ambiguity thanks to a long, poorly-constructed sentence that at least needs a comma adding!
 

autotank

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I know it's against the spirit, but times are tough. What sort of commitment would you have to realistically make in the reserves to qualify for one of these railcards? Third off rail fares for the 30 years left of my working life is potentially quite worthwhile!
 

Fawkes Cat

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I know it's against the spirit, but times are tough. What sort of commitment would you have to realistically make in the reserves to qualify for one of these railcards? Third off rail fares for the 30 years left of my working life is potentially quite worthwhile!
You might be able to make this work...

WHAT IF I WANT TO LEAVE?
You can leave at any time, unless you are serving on operations. If you decide to leave, all you'll need to do is to let your unit know and hand in all of your kit and equipment.
(source: https://apply.army.mod.uk/what-we-offer/reserve-soldier/reserve-soldier-time)

Having said which, I need to come all judgemental and say that in my view to do this would be wrong. But you ain't me, so it's not my judgement that counts.
 

Vespa

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You might be able to make this work...


(source: https://apply.army.mod.uk/what-we-offer/reserve-soldier/reserve-soldier-time)

Having said which, I need to come all judgemental and say that in my view to do this would be wrong. But you ain't me, so it's not my judgement that counts.
Army Reserve is a bit different from Regular service, where you sign for a set number of years with reserve liability after that, if you dont like it at the stsrt, you can buy yourself out compensating the MOD for money spent on training ypu, however the further you go in and more training (and money), you wpuld hsve to give a period of notice, even after you left you still have a reserve liability a set period after leaving.
 

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