New Track Question

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slick

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Hello ladies and gents! I have a question regarding track. Recently on my patch there have been several track renewals over the past few months. The whole lot has been ripped up and replaced in sections. Today whilst driving after another weekend of engineering works I have noticed the addition of what appears to be some sort of fasteners on the sleepers between the running rails. Can anyone tell me what they are? They were not present on the old sleepers or when the track was first laid. They run the entire lengh of the newly laid track which is about a mile or so. (See attacted picture)
 

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boing_uk

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Correct me if I am wrong, but it looks like the picture is taken on a structure, yes? To my mind they look like fasteners for the future installation of guide rails - or whatever they are called - in the four foot.
 

slick

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The 4 track formation runs on a viaduct for a mile +, the track is reletivley staright. Trying to think of why guide rails would be needed?
 

WatcherZero

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They are fasteners for guide rails so that if a train derailed it wouldnt go off the edge. There doesnt need to be a curve for a derailment to occur.
 

The Snap

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Look to me like fixings ready to receive a pandrol e-clip. As already mentioned, with it being on a structure, I'd suggest there will be some derailment containment rail being installed at some point.
 

Kentish Paul

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Yes, this is for the fitting of extra rails to prevent the sideways movement of a derailed train which may otherwise hit the viaduct parapet or, worst case, go over the side. Not sure what their correct name is as they are too far away from the running rail to be strictly check rails.
 

The Snap

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Shouldn't that be Check Rails?

Yes, this is for the fitting of extra rails to prevent the sideways movement of a derailed train which may otherwise hit the viaduct parapet or, worst case, go over the side. Not sure what their correct name is as they are too far away from the running rail to be strictly check rails.

I'm pretty sure it is check rail if you're on NR, but we've been referring to it as 'derailment containment rail' on Metrolink.
 

Joseph_Locke

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Nope, on Network Rail they are Gaurd Rails (but they are intended to provide containment in a derailment) and exist wherever there is an otherwise un-controlled risk of a train falling onto someting or somebody (like on a birdge over a motorway). Gaurd Rails are never in regular contact with the wheelsets, if they were then they would be Check Rails (this is pretty much the definition of the two on NR). The sleepers are probably 5F40GR or EF45GR (the GR is for Gaurd Rail)

The old track may have a had a bit of old ratty rail dogspiked down the fourfoot, you may not have spotted it because it would have been filthy!
 

The Snap

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Nope, on Network Rail they are Gaurd Rails (but they are intended to provide containment in a derailment) and exist wherever there is an otherwise un-controlled risk of a train falling onto someting or somebody (like on a birdge over a motorway). Gaurd Rails are never in regular contact with the wheelsets, if they were then they would be Check Rails (this is pretty much the definition of the two on NR). The sleepers are probably 5F40GR or EF45GR (the GR is for Gaurd Rail)

The old track may have a had a bit of old ratty rail dogspiked down the fourfoot, you may not have spotted it because it would have been filthy!

Thanks for the clarification. Check rails are the rails found on S&C by that logic then?
 

Trog

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Tisk Tisk Mr Locke. Green Fastclips fitted so those are the new guard rail version of either the G44 or EG47.

Expect to see more guard rails fitted in the future as the rules for fitting them have been tightened up. They now have to be fitted to the outside tracks on any bridge or viaduct over I think 30m in length. Unless part of the structure is suitable to act as a derailment curb. This means a structural metal component, reinforced concrete or masonry parapet of a specified thickness, and at least 300mm higher than the rails. Said structure to be confirmed by the structures engineer as being fit for that use.
 

Joseph_Locke

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Avast your tsk Mr Trog and twice avast, I had not examined the picture in detail: that said, I am inclined to agree on EG47GR.

The second paragraph of your answer requires no enhancement other than to note that any rule in standards would be a clarification over the previous "where necessary" level of guidance.

Rich said:
Thanks for the clarification. Check rails are the rails found on S&C by that logic then?

Correct, although check rails can be found in plain line and on viaducts (under other cirumstances), just to confuse ...
 

Trog

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Check rails on plain line! Its enough to drive you round the bend.

Could not make my mind up between G44 or EG47 type sleepers myself, the stepped down end suggests EG47 but the sleepers look too narrow suggesting G44. I suppose I could fire up the laptop and look at the original drawings, but I just can not be ar***d at the moment.

There are now also sets of concrete bearers available for bringing the two guard rails together at the end of the run, and also for the same thing plus catching rails at the start end of a set of guard rails.
 

Ploughman

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When I have installed Guard rails previously. At the ends there was the "Butterfly" section The purpose of which was to gather in any derailed wheelsets and keep them roughly in line with the track.
How is this likely to be catered for in this instance as it did involve long timbers of approx 15ft or is it not required in the trailing direction.
 

Trog

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Given normal LH running I would expect these guard rails to just come together in the middle of the 4' and end, usually 20 yards past the end of the protected structure. There are now special concrete bearers available to do this.

You would only need the catching/butterfly rails at the running on end of the guard rail fitted section of track, or if the track was bi-directionally signalled then at both ends. Again long timbers are so last year, and there are now a set of concrete bearers available to do this.
 

Trog

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As is traditional with all PW components the names change in a random fashion every hundred miles or so.

All helps keep the graduates in their place, as it is hard to look clever while trying to remember if it is pads or mats, nylons or biscuits, long or wheel timbers, cribs or beds, etc etc where you are today.
 
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