Old Names for Locomotive Types

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rdwarr

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Prior to the TOPS renumbering in the 1970s enthusiasts seemed to have much nicer names for type of locomotive. For example, "Class 47" never sounded as nice as "Brush 4".
Were these names fairly universal or did different enclaves of enthusiasts make their own up? I'm sure we all called a Class 55 a "Deltic" but was it just my friends who referred to a 25 as a "Birmingham Bo-Bo"?
Peak (44-46), Brush 2 (47), Shunter (08), Old Shunter (03) and English Electric (40) are others that spring to mind.
 
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Prior to the TOPS renumbering in the 1970s enthusiasts seemed to have much nicer names for type of locomotive. For example, "Class 47" never sounded as nice as "Brush 4".
Were these names fairly universal or did different enclaves of enthusiasts make their own up? I'm sure we all called a Class 55 a "Deltic" but was it just my friends who referred to a 25 as a "Birmingham Bo-Bo"?
Peak (44-46), Brush 2 (47), Shunter (08), Old Shunter (03) and English Electric (40) are others that spring to mind.
I always knew them by nicknames in the 70's.
Class 40 - Whistler
Class 25 - Rat
Class 56 - Grid
Class 50 -Hoover

etc.
 

moonrakerz

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There are some really old names there. I was particularly impressed by the Latin ones; who would have thought the Romans had their own nickname for a Class 20?
Oh come on - Class XX ! :lol::lol:

I can remember, years ago, when serving in the RN a mess mate whose surname was Fordham, being given the very Latin sounding nickname of "Canua"..........
 

Peter Mugridge

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Schnellzug

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On the subject of nicknames, or is it knicknames, i've never been sure exactly why Class 47s are commonly referred to as "Spoons", or class 37s as Siphons. I'm sure there's, a rational explanation, somewhere.
 

Smudger105e

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On the subject of nicknames, or is it knicknames, i've never been sure exactly why Class 47s are commonly referred to as "Spoons", or class 37s as Siphons. I'm sure there's, a rational explanation, somewhere.
I seem to remeber that the 47s were called spoons because thats what the horns sound like, spoooooooooooooooooooon.

The 37s were called EE type3, which rhymed with Siphon G on the Western.

I might be wrong of course!!
 

sprinterguy

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Class 45 were Peaks. They were named after hills and mountains.
No, that was the ten class 44s. The 45s (those that were named) were named after Regiments. Not that there was much to tell apart classes 44, 45 and 46 externally in pre-TOPS days, which was why the three classes became collectively known as Peaks.
 

sprinterguy

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Has ETHEL (ETH generator ex-locomotive against Class 33, rather than Class 25. Mistake or deliberate?
If it was indeed used by South Wales 37 men as that list describes, then I imagine that it was a derogatory term for class 33s, suggesting that they have no power and are only any good for heating carriages. Not being used in its' official capacity.
 

Phil6219

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I'm still puzzled as to why the Class 86s were referred to as "Cans", I'd have guessed because they were made of aluminium but they were not?

I think 60s are called "tugs" because just like a naval tug they can move an incredible load.

Phil 8-)
 

Schnellzug

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What about Class 56s being "grids"? Is it something to do with them hauling a lot of coal for Power stations?

(Yes, it's tenuous, but no more tenuous than a lot of these. )
 

4SRKT

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What about Class 56s being "grids"? Is it something to do with them hauling a lot of coal for Power stations?

(Yes, it's tenuous, but no more tenuous than a lot of these. )
It's because of the square horn grille on the front end.

 

RichmondCommu

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Something I've always wanted to know; why were Class 25's referred to as Rats?
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
No, that was the ten class 44s. The 45s (those that were named) were named after Regiments. Not that there was much to tell apart classes 44, 45 and 46 externally in pre-TOPS days, which was why the three classes became collectively known as Peaks.
The Class 44's were the first class that I ever cleared. By the 1970's they'd been relegated to coal traffic (of which there was plenty in the East Midlands!).
 

Phil6219

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Something I've always wanted to know; why were Class 25's referred to as Rats?
I believe it's because they were found all over the network, or something along those lines. In Scotland they were referred to as McRats (Well they had nearly identical Class 26s).

Phil 8-)
 

RichmondCommu

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I'm surprised that no one has recalled Class 20's being referred to as Choppers due to the noise they made when accelerating. Such wonderful loco's albeit rather under powered. I always remember a trip to Westhouses one Christmas many years a go when their happy "whistle" could be heard across the fields.
 
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No, that was the ten class 44s. The 45s (those that were named) were named after Regiments. Not that there was much to tell apart classes 44, 45 and 46 externally in pre-TOPS days, which was why the three classes became collectively known as Peaks.
Quite right. Thanks for that. I meant the term as a collective one. :D
 
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Professionally, the 50s when first on the Western were referred to as fifty-fifties on account of it being reckoned that you had a fifty-fifty chance of reaching the destination before it failed. After the heavy overhaul - virtual rebuilding - they were much better.
 

Kneedown

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I'm surprised that no one has recalled Class 20's being referred to as Choppers due to the noise they made when accelerating. Such wonderful loco's albeit rather under powered. I always remember a trip to Westhouses one Christmas many years a go when their happy "whistle" could be heard across the fields.
Choppers? You mean Toton Deltic's! :D
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
An old Drivers term for 47's on the Midland was "Four and a half", and even now after 25years on the footplate i still don't know why!
--- old post above --- --- new post below ---
It's because of the square horn grille on the front end.

Although the first forty or so had a square plate with a small grille instead.
One exception was 004 which had the grid at one, if not both ends. Think it must have suffered a collision at some point and been fitted with a new front. Was one of the last ones in BR blue too IIRR.
 
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