Progression

Status
Not open for further replies.

Mullac22

New Member
Joined
13 May 2012
Messages
1
I'm in a bit of a dilemma. I have recently been offered a job as customer service gateline assistant with ScotRail. The job is part time ( was hoping for full time) I was dead set on taking the job and leaving my current job.

However when i informed my current employer, i was then offered a promoted role if i stayed. It annoyed me because the reason i was leaving was because they were basically refusing to develop my career with them. Money wise is actually i earn less if i move because of the part-time with about 4 grand difference (but if i got full time it would more or less double).

What i'm asking is if what sort of progression is there within the industry from gateline? Is it easy to make a decent career with lots of opportunities? I am colourblind so that rules out driver, conductor etc.

Also if anyone knows, are the shifts each week stationary or do they change each week?

Any replies would really help me in my decision. Thanks.
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

Nym

Established Member
Joined
2 Mar 2007
Messages
8,398
Location
Somewhere, not in London
It's not related to the actual job at Scotrail but I have recently faced a similar decision.

I had three job offers (pretty much) on the table, two were in Rail and one in Consulting, the consulting job paid more, was much closer to home and family etc. But it wasn't what I wanted to do, so I chose the job that pays £3,500 less and is based in Central London rather than the one near Chester for a consulting firm.

As I have read many a time, the promotion you've been offered is likely only because you're saying you'll leave, and that the employer has been extracting the urine and knows the're paying you less than you're worth to their company.

Once you have the information about progression, it will be a long and hard decision, god knows it was for me, I turned down a lot. But it's your decision to make, and there's a lot of things to consider other than the money.

PS: "Offered a promoted role if you stayed" isn't a promotion, nor is it legally binding, it sounds to me like they are scared you'll leave and are making empty promises moreso than before. If you need to put your notice in every time you want a promotion, do you really want to be working there?

PPS: I turned down, £3,500 extra wage, company car, international travel and an annual bonus of nearly £10,000 to do the job I wanted to.
 

ChrisTheRef

Established Member
Joined
15 Apr 2009
Messages
1,427
Location
South Liverpool
It's not related to the actual job at Scotrail but I have recently faced a similar decision.

I had three job offers (pretty much) on the table, two were in Rail and one in Consulting, the consulting job paid more, was much closer to home and family etc. But it wasn't what I wanted to do, so I chose the job that pays £3,500 less and is based in Central London rather than the one near Chester for a consulting firm.

As I have read many a time, the promotion you've been offered is likely only because you're saying you'll leave, and that the employer has been extracting the urine and knows the're paying you less than you're worth to their company.

Once you have the information about progression, it will be a long and hard decision, god knows it was for me, I turned down a lot. But it's your decision to make, and there's a lot of things to consider other than the money.

PS: "Offered a promoted role if you stayed" isn't a promotion, nor is it legally binding, it sounds to me like they are scared you'll leave and are making empty promises moreso than before. If you need to put your notice in every time you want a promotion, do you really want to be working there?

PPS: I turned down, £3,500 extra wage, company car, international travel and an annual bonus of nearly £10,000 to do the job I wanted to.
What was the job you accepted over it? :) and how long until you regret it? ;)
 

LCC106

Member
Joined
16 Nov 2011
Messages
757
OK, everyone who knows me on here knows I usually mention "I used to work in HR..." but I use that to explain the viewpoint I'm coming from.

It costs in the region of 12 months' salary to recruit a new starter generally - time involved in drawing up a job description, advert, advertising, sifting applications, interviewing, drawing up contract, appointing, training up... so it is not uncommon for an employer to offer you more money / a different role etc. to retain your skills knowledge and expertise.

What I WOULD say is consider why you applied for this new role in the first place. A desire to get on the railway? Disengaged with your current employer? If the latter, what will change if you stick with them?

Do a list of positives and negatives of each of the 2 roles and use that to help you consider your decision. Hope this helps, if somewhat of a curveball...
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top