Station name suffix

Discussion in 'Railway History & Nostalgia' started by Mark24, 1 Jan 2019.

  1. Spartacus

    Spartacus Established Member

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    Dewsbury Wellington Road is an interesting one, the furthest of three passenger stations from the town centre after Market Place and Central, but still only spitting distance away as the current station and a bit weirdly Market Place was the most central station, being right next to the town hall which was built after the station, and Central was right next to the market after the market relocated in 1904!
     
  2. edwin_m

    edwin_m Veteran Member

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    Interesting that the sign has presumably been updated to say LNER instead of GC, but not LMS instead of L&NW!
     
  3. didcotdean

    didcotdean Member

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    The A4310 road from the A34 as far as the roundabout where you would turn left for the car park was constructed in the 1970s along with the A34 dual carriageway itself. Originally it was national speed limit all the way to that point, but the subsequent expansion of Didcot westwards has dropped the limit to 40mph sometime before it, as well as adding the traffic lights.

    Access from the east is along a road built around 2000 partially on the former DN&SR alignment, but the last part is on the original Station Road built by the GWR in the 1840s.
     
  4. DelW

    DelW Member

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    Another one, Llanbister Road on the Heart of Wales line, built by the Central Wales Railway backed by the LNWR, which is around 5 & 1/2 miles from Llanbister according to Google maps.
     
  5. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    LSWR: Chard Road at one time and South Molton Road.

    Sole Street is named after its village - Street being a common designation of a settlement in the SE. St Kew Highway is an interesting one.
     
  6. randyrippley

    randyrippley Established Member

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    Amusing that Chard Rd was actually in the village of Perry Street. Those Romans got everywhere ("Street" is an indicator of an ancient, usually Roman road, in this case the Fosse Way)
    In Odcombe (also in Somerset) there's actually a road called Street Lane - again Roman
     
  7. xotGD

    xotGD Established Member

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    Is Streethouse cheating?

    Or Chester-le-Street?
     
  8. Welshman

    Welshman Established Member

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    And, with respect, I'd go a stage further and suggest in some cases it referred not only to the ability to change trains but also to change railway companies, and that these stations were in effect joint stations.
    Wrexham Exchange - GW to GC and vv.
    Manchester Exchange - LNW to L&Y and vv.
    Bradford Exchange - L&Y to GN and vv.
    Liverpool Exchange -L&Y to ELR & LC&SR.[Liverpool, Crosby and Southport Railway] and vv.
    And, in later posts, Barnsley Exchange - L&Y to GC [via Court House to Penistone & Manchester] and vv.
     
  9. Mutant Lemming

    Mutant Lemming Established Member

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    The quote from the Disused Stations site for Bradford Exchange states The original Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway terminus in Bradford was situated at Adolphus street, but the facilities were inadequate and inconveniently sited. The station was closed to passengers in 1867 and the line was extended into Exchange station situated closer to the city centre near to the wool exchange, after which it was named.

    With regard to Liverpool it's proximity to the exchanges was they key factor in it's name - being a terminus for Northbound services it was never really an exchange btween services or companies.
     
    Last edited: 18 Jan 2019
  10. Taunton

    Taunton Established Member

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    When it comes to station suffixes nobody can beat the French. On the Vivaris preserved line, for example, in the middle of remote hill country, there's a trivial wayside stop (hardly even a platform) "Colombier-le-Vieux/Saint-Barthélémy-le-Plain" - for what the GWR would have called Colombier Halt.
     
  11. Welshman

    Welshman Established Member

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    Interesting.....

    According to the Lost Railways in West Yorkshire site, the L&Y originally terminated at Drake St in 1850. This makes more sense, as approaching from the south-west, the line from Halifax would have had to make a circuitous journey around Bradford to reach Adolphus St.
    It was the GNR, approaching from Leeds and the east, which opened its station at Adolphus St in 1854.
    As you say, this site was inconvenient - too far out of Bradford and passengers from Leeds used the Midland Railway instead, so a deep cutting was constructed from Hammerton St to meet the L&Y at Mill Lane Junction [still used today], enabling the GNR to use Drake St.
    Drake St was then jointly enlarged in 1867, and renamed "Exchange"

    http://www.lostrailwayswestyorkshire.co.uk/Bradford.htm

    The Bradford Wool Exchange was completed about the same time, so was the enlarged station renamed to reflect its joint L&Y & GNR ownership, or its proximity to the Wool Exchange? You pays your money and takes your pick.... :smile:
     
  12. Dr_Paul

    Dr_Paul Member

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    Then we have Green Street Green in Kent, with the almost inevitable Green Street Green Road leading to it. It's a shame that there wasn't a station built somewhere along that road.
     
  13. quarella

    quarella Member

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    Wellington-Telford West seems incomplete now known as plain Wellington. Of course the suffix was was only added with the construction of the newtown of Telford.
     
  14. Monarch010

    Monarch010 Member

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    Using "West" as a suffix rather than a prefix has always seemed a bit odd to me.
     
  15. quarella

    quarella Member

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    It is. I suppose it was just the name I was familiar wit.
     
  16. DelW

    DelW Member

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    Not unusual suffixes in themselves, but odd in their application, Canterbury East and Canterbury West, for stations which are almost exactly north and south of each other.
    Not a station, so a bit off-topic, but I always liked the apparent circularity of Junction Road Junction in north London.
     
  17. etr221

    etr221 Member

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    ... to go with Box Signal Box
     
  18. Helvellyn

    Helvellyn Established Member

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    I had to use Google to find out that it is now Ashurst New Forest.
     
  19. xotGD

    xotGD Established Member

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    Quite a few geometric shapes used as station name suffixes. We have Squares, Circuses and Crescents, but best of the bunch is Winnersh Triangle.
     
  20. edwin_m

    edwin_m Veteran Member

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    Perhaps Hull Paragon was meant to be Polygon?
     
  21. Helvellyn

    Helvellyn Established Member

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    Marine, Harbour, Quay, Docks and Pier have been used to indicate a station that had interchange with ferry services, for example:
    • Newhaven Marine;
    • Fishguard Harbour;
    • Harwich Parkeston Quay (renamed Harwich International);
    • Dover Western Docks (now closed but originally opened as Dover Marine); and
    • Lymington Pier
    As ever, there are exceptions. I believe Warrington Bank Quay was named after a Quay on the adjacent river Mersey.
     
  22. swt_passenger

    swt_passenger Veteran Member

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    For anyone wondering, it was apparently named after its proximity to Junction Road, which was there in 1813, well before the railway was built:
     
  23. Merciful Zeus!

    Merciful Zeus! Member

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    Like "Beaulieu Road". Also "Lyndhurst Road", before it was renamed for the village that is actually adjacent to it!
     
  24. Calthrop

    Calthrop Established Member

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    Just seen this -- is there a possible explanation: one of the two was presumably originally South Eastern Railway, the other London, Chatham & Dover; did these two rival systems consider themselves / each other on some basis, as more easterly / more westerly -- that, reflected in the stations' suffixes?
     
  25. Bookd

    Bookd Member

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    Similarly to the 'road' suffix 'junction' was often the place where you would change trains to go to the named point. For example Clapham Junction is in Battersea and is quite a step from Clapham.
     
  26. Dr_Paul

    Dr_Paul Member

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    Winnersh Triangle puzzled me, as it wasn't a triangular junction (or a junction at all), but I learnt that it's named after the Winnersh Triangle Industrial Estate. It's possible that it's called that because the site is vaguely triangular in shape, but that's just a guess.
     
  27. d9009alycidon

    d9009alycidon Member

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    The station name that always raised a smile with me was Fairlie High so named to distinguish itself from the Harbour station, it was for a while Fairlie Town and has dropped the suffix altogether. It was not the only "high", the other being at Falkirk, and there was also an "Upper" and "Lower" at Whifflet, and to access the Lower station the passenger had to enter the Upper station, walk the length of the platform then descend one of two flights of stairs to access the Lower Platforms
     
  28. 30907

    30907 Established Member

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    They were only so named by the SECR after amalgamation - by which time there was already a Canterbury South on the Elham Valley Line.
    I suppose East and North wouldn't have been so obviously on opposite lines? Or perhaps the analogy was with Maidstone? But this is all guesswork.
     
  29. edwin_m

    edwin_m Veteran Member

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    On the Tyne and Wear Metro West Jesmond is north of Jesmond. Moving up the line South Gosforth is the only station for Gosforth but it's north-east of where most people would consider the centre of Gosforth to be. I believe the reason is that the centres of both communities have migrated over time, in part at least due to the building of the stations! (as heavy rail, not the Metro conversion).
     
  30. EbbwJunction1

    EbbwJunction1 Member

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    Newport used to be Newport High Street, and was named as such to distinguish it from Newport Dock Street and Newport Mill Street.

    However, whilst the latter two were on the streets after which they were named, High Street station isn't on High Street. It used to be at the junction of Station Approach and Cambrian Road and, due to road reconstruction, is now on Queensway. Because a new station building was built for the Ryder Cup in 2010 (it'll be nice when it's finished!), it's now further away from High Street than it was before!
     

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