Swanage PTS

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Beaker

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Im so bored i decided to write about what i did yesterday.

I arrived at the MPD at 10ish sat down and waited with a few of my mates and then we were split into groups of 5. My group walked from the end of the head shunt to swanage platform. Just learning the safe walking routes and basic stuff like acknowledging a train. I knew most of the stuff anyway.

And basically i passed it and should get the card on the july 8th. The card lets me take 1 other person with me blah de darr. Anyway it was a fun day and i should really have done this a few years ago but kept forgetting.
 
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Coxster

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Harold said:
I think 960012 is talking about you Steve. Havan't found any other Mr Wright on this forum.
Wouldn't that be Mr Wrong though?




GETS THUMPED! Sorry - couldn't resist ;)
 

Tomnick

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Nope, he's saying that the GCR doesn't require staff to have PTS to be on or about the line - mainly due to the light railway order, I suspect. It's probably for the same reason that PTS on the Swanage Railway is available to under 16s! I doubt it's as thorough as the mainline equivalent - it certainly wasn't on the North Norfolk, mainly due to the 25mph maximum speed!
 

AlexS

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Yahar by jiminy, tis a sad day when a bobby has to translate summat I've said :)

Yeah, basically we get told the basic stuff like acknowledging drivers and not walking with your back to the trains in the running direction, but a formal PTS qualification isn't required.
 

Coxster

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AlexS said:
not walking with your back to the trains in the running direction.
Surely walking on a single line backwards, guessing the direction of the next train is more dangerous? ;) We don't all have double track! :D
 

bunnahabhain

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You should always walk in the cess on the side facing the direction of the most likely oncoming train.

Just because a line is uni-directional doesnt mean bi-directional working with a Pilotman cannot be initiated! I did two round trips working on the Up Line Thursday just gone, though Alex did turn up for the trip where we used both lines again.....the numpty!
 

Coxster

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Jamie said:
You should always walk in the cess on the side facing the direction of the most likely oncoming train.

Just because a line is uni-directional doesnt mean bi-directional working with a Pilotman cannot be initiated! I did two round trips working on the Up Line Thursday just gone, though Alex did turn up for the trip where we used both lines again.....the numpty!
I was having a laugh - hence the ;);)
 

Tomnick

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The above doesn't, of course, apply to lineside photographers, who are clearly safest walking down the fourfoot with their back to traffic!

Of course, on single lines, the solution is to walk sideways - not got your back to any trains then ;).
 

bunnahabhain

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Tomnick said:
The above doesn't, of course, apply to lineside photographers, who are clearly safest walking down the fourfoot with their back to traffic!
Naturally they're adept at applying protection on all running lines, using the emergency equipment of a tripod placed neatly on the rails with a camera mounted ontop. With a great big pair of buttocks to cushion an oncoming train from behind them. :)
 
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