Unfortunately-named locomotives?

Discussion in 'Railway History & Nostalgia' started by Calthrop, 26 Oct 2019.

  1. 341o2

    341o2 Established Member

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    The list of narrow gauge locos built by Hunslet have yielded three more candidates, Cackler, Lady Madcap and Torpedo
     
  2. Merthyr Imp

    Merthyr Imp Member

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    The Great Western had broad gauge engines named Vixen and Cupid. Don't know about the rest though.
     
  3. Calthrop

    Calthrop Established Member

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    Dinorwic Quarries locos, I believe -- as mentioned by me upthread -- yet more, which mined from the IMO splendid racehorse-names seam.

    I understand that Rudolph & co. were invented well post-1892 :smile: .
     
  4. tbtc

    tbtc Veteran Member

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    Ah, memories of long car journeys a generation ago, coming back from an away match, listening to BBC Radio Scotland's football coverage, which finished at six o'clock, at which stage we were always invited to "Take The Floor" with Robbie Shepherd, who always seemed to have some Jimmy Shand... :lol: << great name for a loco running around the Highlands IMHO.

    That always confused me (since I knew of Only Fools And Horses, but little about historic ships).

    Same with 47 703 - St Mungo - I was aware of St Andrew and the other Scottish references on the 47/7s (Greyfriars Bobby etc) but as I'm not from the west coast I wasn't aware of the significance of St Mungo - it sounded like a bit of a rude/naughty word that you wouldn't be allowed to say nowadays - rather than a noble name of a historic figure.
     
  5. 341o2

    341o2 Established Member

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    Torpedo is in Austraila, while the first mention of Santa having reindeer was in 1821, they are named in the poem "Was the night before Christmas" by W. Clement Moore 1823, it was Rudolph who came much later. All very far removed from the Norse legend that in winter, Odin would ride across the snowy wastes bringing presents, or the Romans giving presents during Saturnalia
     
  6. 43096

    43096 Established Member

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    I see what you did there!
    :lol:
     
  7. edwin_m

    edwin_m Veteran Member

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    They can't have a loco called Rudolph anyway, as they aren't allowed to carry red lights at the front.
    Really dig that one?
     
  8. Steamysandy

    Steamysandy Member

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    St Mungo is associated with Glasgow but Mungoswells lies just west of Drem on the south side of the East Coast MainLine in East Lothian!
     
  9. 70014IronDuke

    70014IronDuke Established Member

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    Wonderful story! These days a kid would probably not even notice it, he'd be tied up on his mobile ap.
    And coincidental that it should involve Woolwinder. A few weeks ago, I was wondering as to which A3 was the first I'd ever seen, and I simply had no idea. (I remember my first A2 - Dante - and my first A1 - Pommern, and I have a memory of the sightings.) Now you mention it, I'm kind of 85% sure it was Woolwinder, although I don't actually remember the event. It was at Sandy, probably around February-March 1961.) I think it was an early withdrawal, so I only saw it the once.

    Honourable mention should also be given to some A1s. I think we can forget Archibald Sturrock, but Hal'o the Wynd was definitely up there with the very best in surreal madness, even though I'm not at all sure to what Hal was or wasn't. :) Silurian not bad, either.
     
    Last edited: 16 Nov 2019
  10. Blinkbonny

    Blinkbonny Member

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    Not forgetting Auld Reekie!
     
  11. Calthrop

    Calthrop Established Member

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    @43096 writes: "I see what you did there ! :lol: "

    I assure you with total sincerity, that it was completely unintended...

    Self (Calthrop):
    Shows how much I know :oops: ! So except for Rudy, they in fact all but pre-date railways...

    Google tells me that Hal o' the Wynd was named after yet another Walter Scott character. HO'TW is a nickname for one Henry Gow, who features in the novel The Fair Maid of Perth. He's a skilled smith and armour-maker, plus a fierce fighting badass in his own right. (The "Wynd" part refers not to that which blows; but to the Scotish word "Wynd", pronounced like "wined", meaning a back-street or alley.) The railways seem to have found Sir Walter's creations, a wonderful source of names. Has me feeling that some of the old fellow's novels might actually be worth reading -- I did in fact read a few, many years ago, and reckoned them -- well, "all right".
     
  12. Lucan

    Lucan Member

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    I'm currently reading Waverley and the name of the station should last longer than the name on any locomotive. Very good writing in a slow old-fashioned style. Tongue-in cheek a lot of the time, and surprisingly sarky and stereotypical about the Scots themselves in places. The first time Waverley (an Englishman) finds himself in the company of Scotsmen, they get blind drunk. Here is an extract that hints at what was worn or not under the kilt :
     
  13. Merthyr Imp

    Merthyr Imp Member

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    Any relation to Neil Gow (60082)?
     
  14. Steamysandy

    Steamysandy Member

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    I don't think so.Neil Gow was a noted fiddle ( violin) player and composer in I think the 18th century.After a crop failure he wrote Neil Gows Farewell to Whisky!
    The Jimmy Shand of his day!!
     
  15. Merthyr Imp

    Merthyr Imp Member

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    And had a racehorse named after him!
     
  16. Calthrop

    Calthrop Established Member

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    A further "Gow" item: the Wiki article on the loco concerned -- as well as briefly outlining who "Hal" was in Scott's legendarium -- mentions that the surname "Gow" is an equivalent of "Smith"; the word -- rhyming with "cow" -- being derived from the Scottish Gaelic word (no doubt spelt differently in Gaelic) for a metal-smith: appropriate to the profession of the character in the novel.
     
  17. Jim Jehosofat

    Jim Jehosofat Member

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    I got told off for suggesting that 90005 had the correct name, Vice-Admiral Lord Nelson, as he was a cripple and died in service.
     
  18. mcatts

    mcatts Member

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    That class 90 - The Big Dish!
     
  19. Cowley

    Cowley Established Member Associate Staff General Discussion

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    I didn’t realise I had a loco named after me...
     
  20. DPWH

    DPWH On Moderation

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    Actually a Leander Class light cruiser rather than a destroyer.

    Most of the class 50s were given names of battleships, battlecruisers and aircraft carriers rather than mere cruisers. Oddly, one wasn't called Nelson.
     

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