• Dear Guest, and welcome to RailUK Forums. Our non-railway discussion forums are currently restricted until members have five or more posts, and you will not be able to make a new thread or reply to an existing one in this section until you have made five or more posts elsewhere on the forum.

Maths question (relating to floorplans)

Status
Not open for further replies.

hi2u_uk

Member
Joined
26 Apr 2014
Messages
121
Im interested in viewing the property with the attached floorplan however as you can see the second largest bedroom doesnt have a third wall. If i add a wall along the yellow line, is it possible to state the length and breadth of the resulting room based on the info in the floorplan ???????
floorplan.png
 
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

deltic

Established Member
Joined
8 Feb 2010
Messages
2,503
Assuming the location of the door is shown reasonably accurately then the bedroom is roughly 2.85m by 3.6m
 

Domh245

Established Member
Joined
6 Apr 2013
Messages
8,067
Location
nowhere
Sticking the floorplan into an image manipulation program, you can measure how long a reference feature is (for example, the bedroom underneath the one you intend to put the wall in) - 229px by 184px - divide number of pixels by known distance to get a rough estimate of "pixels/m" - around 51.5 in this case.

Measure distance you want to know (wall to centre of yellow line), divide by 51.5 and you get the rough distance - 2.95m I make it (double checking the width and it is 3.6m - that extra bit outside the toilet is not part of their measure!)
 

hi2u_uk

Member
Joined
26 Apr 2014
Messages
121
Assuming the location of the door is shown reasonably accurately then the bedroom is roughly 2.85m by 3.6m
That would be an ok size

Sticking the floorplan into an image manipulation program, you can measure how long a reference feature is (for example, the bedroom underneath the one you intend to put the wall in) - 229px by 184px - divide number of pixels by known distance to get a rough estimate of "pixels/m" - around 51.5 in this case.

Measure distance you want to know (wall to centre of yellow line), divide by 51.5 and you get the rough distance - 2.95m I make it (double checking the width and it is 3.6m - that extra bit outside the toilet is not part of their measure!)
cool i wouldn't have thought of doing this
 

Ediswan

Member
Joined
15 Nov 2012
Messages
1,083
Location
Stevenage
If that drawing is to scale, the gap between the new wall and the bannister would be narrower than the stairs.
 

GB

Established Member
Joined
16 Nov 2008
Messages
6,098
Location
Somewhere
Ignoring maths for a moment, is it not a bit odd to have and opened planned bedroom like that? To get to the other bedrooms and WC you would need to go through that bedroom?
 

LSWR Cavalier

Established Member
Joined
23 Aug 2020
Messages
1,222
Location
Leafy Suburbia
Never trust a plan, you can estimate the dimensions but go and measure it yourself! Could be that there are many similar properties like those in some endless terraces in London, might find dimensions in the www.
 

edwin_m

Veteran Member
Joined
21 Apr 2013
Messages
21,757
Location
Nottingham
Ignoring maths for a moment, is it not a bit odd to have and opened planned bedroom like that? To get to the other bedrooms and WC you would need to go through that bedroom?
Presuming that's why the OP wants to wall it off? But the bathroom off the kitchen is a bit peculiar too, not to mention the toilet with no nearby hand washing.
 

swt_passenger

Veteran Member
Joined
7 Apr 2010
Messages
26,384
Never trust a plan, you can estimate the dimensions but go and measure it yourself! Could be that there are many similar properties like those in some endless terraces in London, might find dimensions in the www.
And be careful because IIRC estate agents nearly always put the longer dimension first, whether it’s across or up and down the drawing. Oh, and measure into bays, ignore chimney breasts, and in that middle room measure right across ignoring the stairwell…
 

SteveM70

Established Member
Joined
11 Jul 2018
Messages
1,856
Ignoring maths for a moment, is it not a bit odd to have and opened planned bedroom like that? To get to the other bedrooms and WC you would need to go through that bedroom?

This

Maybe the plan isn’t accurate, and there is a wall there. Are there photos on the website to help?
 

MotCO

Established Member
Joined
25 Aug 2014
Messages
2,355
Given the diningrRoom is below the bedroom, you can work out some of the sizes. The dining room is 11'10" x 11'7", and the bedroom is 11'10" x 14'7", the only difference being the staircase. From this you can assume that the staircase is 3' wide.

I would think that the landing needs to be 3' wide as well, otherwise it may be difficult to get beds and wardrobes into the front bedroom. The thickness of the partition wall needs to be taken into account, so the room will be 14'7" - 3'0" (landing) - 0'6" (wall), i.e. 11"1' x 11'10". If the partition is not straight but zigzags into the landing near the front bedroom, you may be able to create a space for an inbuilt wardrobe without encroaching into the footprint of the room.
 

LSWR Cavalier

Established Member
Joined
23 Aug 2020
Messages
1,222
Location
Leafy Suburbia
In some countries it is customary to quote the total floor area of a dwelling in square metres, calculated by a standardised method. Means a bit more than 'three-bedroomed house'.
 

DelW

Established Member
Joined
15 Jan 2015
Messages
2,011
Given the diningrRoom is below the bedroom, you can work out some of the sizes. The dining room is 11'10" x 11'7", and the bedroom is 11'10" x 14'7", the only difference being the staircase. From this you can assume that the staircase is 3' wide.

I would think that the landing needs to be 3' wide as well, otherwise it may be difficult to get beds and wardrobes into the front bedroom. The thickness of the partition wall needs to be taken into account, so the room will be 14'7" - 3'0" (landing) - 0'6" (wall), i.e. 11"1' x 11'10". If the partition is not straight but zigzags into the landing near the front bedroom, you may be able to create a space for an inbuilt wardrobe without encroaching into the footprint of the room.
I don't think that works. Either the width of both the landing and the stairs has to be taken off the bedroom width, or alternatively the width of the landing has to be taken off the dining room width. Either way you end up with a bedroom width of around 8' 7" less a stud wall (which could be a bit less than 6").

So you end up with the bedroom about 8' 2" x 11' 10".

(For me, it'd be easier in metric, though no more spacious :'()
 

Peter Mugridge

Veteran Member
Joined
8 Apr 2010
Messages
12,255
Location
Epsom
But the bathroom off the kitchen is a bit peculiar too, not to mention the toilet with no nearby hand washing.
That's very odd - and isn't there a legal requirement for there to be two doors between any toilet and a food preparation area, or is that just for cafés and restaurants?
 

Gloster

Established Member
Joined
4 Sep 2020
Messages
2,634
Location
Up the creek
That's very odd - and isn't there a legal requirement for there to be two doors between any toilet and a food preparation area, or is that just for cafés and restaurants?
There may be such a rule for private houses, but there could be ‘grandfather rights’. I looked around a place in 2003 that had a toilet leading straight off the kitchen. However, the interior decor suggested that the house hadn’t been altered for at least twenty years.

Never trust an estate agent’s plan. (Is that statement is still valid if you delete the last word?) A recent house plan I looked at had the only access to one room through the French windows. Study of the photos revealed that there was a door, but in an odd place. (Was it omitted deliberately?)
 

Peter Mugridge

Veteran Member
Joined
8 Apr 2010
Messages
12,255
Location
Epsom
There may be such a rule for private houses, but there could be ‘grandfather rights’. I looked around a place in 2003 that had a toilet leading straight off the kitchen. However, the interior decor suggested that the house hadn’t been altered for at least twenty years.
The floor plan in the OP does look very like that of a standard Victorian terraced house, so yes... quite possibly.

When I bought my house ( not a Victorian terrace, but a semi ) in 1993 there was a toilet in a similar position just behind the kitchen but it did have two doors between them as it was accessed via what I suppose you could call a scullery. I have since had the place re-arranged and the toilet is now upstairs in the bathroom and the kitchen expanded to include the area previously taken up by the scullery and toilet.
 

Gloster

Established Member
Joined
4 Sep 2020
Messages
2,634
Location
Up the creek
The floor plan in the OP does look very like that of a standard Victorian terraced house, so yes... quite possibly.
It does look very like a Victorian terrace. Originally that would have been two up, two down, a lean-to kitchen and scullery out the back, and a toilet down the garden/yard. From experience, it is the recent add-on at the back that is most likely to be troublesome.
 

DynamicSpirit

Established Member
Joined
12 Apr 2012
Messages
5,461
I don't think that works. Either the width of both the landing and the stairs has to be taken off the bedroom width, or alternatively the width of the landing has to be taken off the dining room width. Either way you end up with a bedroom width of around 8' 7" less a stud wall (which could be a bit less than 6").

So you end up with the bedroom about 8' 2" x 11' 10".

(For me, it'd be easier in metric, though no more spacious :'()

That would be my calculation too.

By the way, if I've read that plan correctly, neither the dining room nor the kitchen appear to have windows to outside - I imagine that the reception room bay window would throw some light into the dining room though. What window the kitchen either has or used to have simply looks out into the shed. Those would be my immediate concerns before thinking about walling off that bedroom - but as others have said, you'd really need to see the house.
 

DarloRich

Veteran Member
Joined
12 Oct 2010
Messages
25,718
Location
Fenny Stratford
Scale the measurements off the plan as a guide but go and measure it and then stand inside the line and make sure you are happy with the space left available and also make sure you plan the door swing into your thoughts
Ignoring maths for a moment, is it not a bit odd to have and opened planned bedroom like that? To get to the other bedrooms and WC you would need to go through that bedroom?

My house is a very old pre Victorian terrace. My en suite bathroom ( which was the only bathroom until I did some work) is only accessible through the back bedroom. I suspect all in the row are/were like that. They were all built with an outside toilet ( which i still had when I moved in) and later had a kitchen and bathroom extension added. Most have added a downstairs bathroom off the kitchen, moved the stairs and converted the upstairs bathroom into a 3rd bedroom. To do that you shave space off the back bedroom but it is still usable

The plan above is similar to my house ( and one of the option plans I had drawn up for my renovation) and I suspect the layouts were similar in the past. The stairs may well have been moved from a central location ( mine are between the front and back rooms) to the side wall at some point. It is odd that there wasn't a dividing wall put in when the stairs were moved mind. I would find out when it was done and check the building regs.

Looking at that house I would take the upstairs toilet out and move the wall for bedroom 3 forward a bit and add in the yellow wall or look to see if I could convert that toilet into a en suite of some kind. (I have gone all homes under the hammer there!)

Presuming that's why the OP wants to wall it off? But the bathroom off the kitchen is a bit peculiar too, not to mention the toilet with no nearby hand washing.

it is fairly common for a terraced house. More concerning is the sliding door that seems to be shown and what i suspect is the former chimney breast for the kitchen range. Note from painful and expensive personal history: if you take that out be very careful you check what is up there.

I might also see about making the lean to part of the kitchen by replacing it with a permanent structure.

My rates for renovation consultancy are very reasonable and if you find a genuine like for like quote elsewhere we promise to double the difference!
 
Last edited:

swt_passenger

Veteran Member
Joined
7 Apr 2010
Messages
26,384
That's very odd - and isn't there a legal requirement for there to be two doors between any toilet and a food preparation area, or is that just for cafés and restaurants?
I rented in the mid 70s, and I think the two door rule was just coming into force, we had a bathroom at the back of the ground floor beyond the kitchen with what was seen as a wasted space between them.
 

DarloRich

Veteran Member
Joined
12 Oct 2010
Messages
25,718
Location
Fenny Stratford
I rented in the mid 70s, and I think the two door rule was just coming into force, we had a bathroom at the back of the ground floor beyond the kitchen with what was seen as a wasted space between them.

The rule now, irc, is one door IF you have a hand basin in the downstairs bathroom
 

MotCO

Established Member
Joined
25 Aug 2014
Messages
2,355
I don't think that works. Either the width of both the landing and the stairs has to be taken off the bedroom width, or alternatively the width of the landing has to be taken off the dining room width. Either way you end up with a bedroom width of around 8' 7" less a stud wall (which could be a bit less than 6").

So you end up with the bedroom about 8' 2" x 11' 10".

(For me, it'd be easier in metric, though no more spacious :'()

Yes, I can see that now. The bedroom is 14'7" -3' (staircase) - 3' (landing) - 6" (Wall) = 8'1" x 11'1". But you could still stagger the wall to incorporate a wardrobe or cupboard.
 

johnnychips

Established Member
Joined
19 Nov 2011
Messages
3,022
Location
Sheffield
That's very odd - and isn't there a legal requirement for there to be two doors between any toilet and a food preparation area, or is that just for cafés and restaurants?
You haven’t been to Belgium, where there are many self-designed houses where toilets immediately abut kitchen and living areas. However, they do not seem as bothered about hiding toilet noises and smells as us. This is based on experience of four of my friends’ houses.
 

westv

Established Member
Joined
29 Mar 2013
Messages
3,332
I lived for 20 years in a house with only a ground floor bathroom and I would never choose to do so again.
 

Snow1964

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2019
Messages
1,161
Location
West Wiltshire
I don't think that works. Either the width of both the landing and the stairs has to be taken off the bedroom width, or alternatively the width of the landing has to be taken off the dining room width. Either way you end up with a bedroom width of around 8' 7" less a stud wall (which could be a bit less than 6").

So you end up with the bedroom about 8' 2" x 11' 10".

(For me, it'd be easier in metric, though no more spacious :'()

Which is a fairly small bedroom

Old 4’6” wide double beds are rare now, most are 5’ or King size 6’ and these are 6’6” long (more realistically 6’9” with headboard and duvet hanging over feet end)

So if room is 8’2” only got 1’5” (about 44cm) to walk around end of bed.

If you want a wardrobe, chest of drawers, dressing table (or desk) and bedside tables then you will realistically only get single bed in it
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top