On the search for an operational station with this layout.

Status
Not open for further replies.

Mark24

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2018
Messages
27
I’m looking to find a station, that’s still in use today, which was built to a similar design of the old Brackley station in the photo below.
There were many stations built to this design around the Country in the mid to late 1800s, possibly designed by J.W Livock? But it seems most of them disappeared in the Beeching cuts.
Has anyone come across anything that’s still in place and fully used as a station today?
 

Attachments

  • 49EE145E-9D80-4DBD-B13C-587AA0D39917.png
    49EE145E-9D80-4DBD-B13C-587AA0D39917.png
    860 KB · Views: 300
Sponsor Post - registered members do not see these adverts; click here to register, or click here to log in
R

RailUK Forums

zwk500

Established Member
Joined
20 Jan 2020
Messages
2,512
Location
Milton Keynes
Kingussie (on the Highland Line) is a pure Up/Down loop and Nunthorpe on the Esk Valley line is a passing loop but one line does permit wrong-direction departures. Both are 2 side platforms with an old station building. There's many, many more around the country

If you include stations with an Island platform instead of side platforms, there's quite a few on the Far North and West Highland lines. And then there's Penryn station, with separate platforms for each direction but both on the same side of the line.
 

yorksrob

Veteran Member
Joined
6 Aug 2009
Messages
30,343
Location
Yorks
Are we talking single track with a loop line ?

There are quite a few, such as Rye in Sussex (albeit with staggered platforms) where a double track railway has been singled.
 

Gloster

Established Member
Joined
4 Sep 2020
Messages
2,672
Location
Up the creek
Just to be clear, this appears to be Brackley Town on the Verney Junction-Banbury line, not Brackley Central on the old Great Central main line. It seems to have been a fairly typical passing loop on a single-track line with side platforms and a small goods yard alongside.
 

Mark24

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2018
Messages
27
Sorry for the confusion, I was referring to the actual station Building.
Bicester, Winslow and Buckingham all had the same design but are now gone.
If possible I would like to find an example of this style of building still in use.
 

Gloster

Established Member
Joined
4 Sep 2020
Messages
2,672
Location
Up the creek
The line was opened by the same company as the Oxford-Bletchley one, the Buckinghamshire Railway, but it was strongly under the influence of the London & North Western Railway. I don’t know whether the buildings were to the standard LNWR design of the period (ca. 1849) or whether they were a special design chosen by Robert Stephenson, the engineer responsible, or one of his standard designs. The disused-stations website may have some more information.
 

John Webb

Established Member
Joined
5 Jun 2010
Messages
2,271
Location
St Albans
I’m looking to find a station, that’s still in use today, which was built to a similar design of the old Brackley station in the photo below.
There were many stations built to this design around the Country in the mid to late 1800s, possibly designed by J.W Livock? But it seems most of them disappeared in the Beeching cuts.
Has anyone come across anything that’s still in place and fully used as a station today?
"The Oxford Companion to British Railway History" (OUP, 1997) confirms that John Livock (1814 to ?) was the architect of the stations on the Buckinghamshire Railway on behalf of the LNWR. He also built stations on other lines. This book says that Atherstone, Oundle and Wansford are the only remaining examples. But it seems none of them match the style of the Brackley station (click on photo to go to the larger original on the Geograph website):
Atherstone Station

© Copyright David Stowell and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

No picture of the Oundle station - now a private house - on the Geograph website; see its entry on the Disused Stations website

Wansford Station

© Copyright Jonathan Thacker and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
 

Mark24

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2018
Messages
27
"The Oxford Companion to British Railway History" (OUP, 1997) confirms that John Livock (1814 to ?) was the architect of the stations on the Buckinghamshire Railway on behalf of the LNWR. He also built stations on other lines. This book says that Atherstone, Oundle and Wansford are the only remaining examples. But it seems none of them match the style of the Brackley station (click on photo to go to the larger original on the Geograph website):
Atherstone Station

© Copyright David Stowell and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

No picture of the Oundle station - now a private house - on the Geograph website; see its entry on the Disused Stations website

Wansford Station

© Copyright Jonathan Thacker and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
Thanks for the recommendation. I’ll have to get hold of a copy.
I did think finding an intact example might have been a bit of a long shot as smaller stations like these have mostly had building removed or the stations closed completely.

I noticed Bow Street station, that reopened today in Wales, originally had a station building of this design. But sadly it hasn’t survived.
 

Dr Hoo

Established Member
Joined
10 Nov 2015
Messages
2,748
Location
Hope Valley
It seems that John Livock (died 15 March 1883) has a Wikipedia page with a long list of his buildings. From a quick skim it would appear that may of them were bespoke designs (and probably a majority of his work has been lost completely). So I am not sure that the OP's assumption of a 'standard' design is valid.

The basic concept of 'two gables with a canopy in between' seems to have been common on many railways. Quite a few extant examples along the CLC, such as Padgate, immediately spring to mind but there were plenty of others by various architects.
 

Mark24

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2018
Messages
27
It seems that John Livock (died 15 March 1883) has a Wikipedia page with a long list of his buildings. From a quick skim it would appear that may of them were bespoke designs (and probably a majority of his work has been lost completely). So I am not sure that the OP's assumption of a 'standard' design is valid.

The basic concept of 'two gables with a canopy in between' seems to have been common on many railways. Quite a few extant examples along the CLC, such as Padgate, immediately spring to mind but there were plenty of others by various architects.
Many thanks, this is what I’m looking for. I see there’s also a staffed version of this type of station a bit further down the line at Widnes which may be even more complete. I look forward to paying it a visit once lockdown restrictions are lifted and take a look.
 

yorksrob

Veteran Member
Joined
6 Aug 2009
Messages
30,343
Location
Yorks
It reminds me a little of Penrith. Also, the Midland Railway seemed to have a lot of stations of the double gable with canopy/porch in between, such as on the Settle & Carlisle line.
 

John Webb

Established Member
Joined
5 Jun 2010
Messages
2,271
Location
St Albans
Thanks for the recommendation. I’ll have to get hold of a copy.
I did think finding an intact example might have been a bit of a long shot as smaller stations like these have mostly had building removed or the stations closed completely.

I noticed Bow Street station, that reopened today in Wales, originally had a station building of this design. But sadly it hasn’t survived.
A better book to get might be the one mentioned on the Disused Stations website regarding the line on which Brackley station was sited?
 

edwin_m

Veteran Member
Joined
21 Apr 2013
Messages
21,806
Location
Nottingham
If I recall correctly the Metcalfe Models kit is based on the CLC stations such as Widnes and Padgate.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Top